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A celebration of Sen. Lyda Green's life

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A celebration of Sen. Lyda Green's life


Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy gives an Alaska flag to Curtis Green, the husband of the late Sen. Lyda Green.

About 150 Alaskans attended the celebration and memorial for the life of the late Sen. Lyda Green, who died Dec. 19, 2023 in Soldotna.

At the chapel in Janssen’s MatSu Funeral Home, Gov. Mike Dunleavy presented to Sen. Green’s husband Curtis Green an Alaska flag that had been flown above Alaska’s Capitol. Along with dozens of friends and family, Must Read Alaska spotted several former state lawmakers, local political figures, and former aides to Green who attended to share the memory of the woman who served for 14 years in the Alaska Senate, starting in 1994.

Presenting a memoriam from the Alaska Legislature was Sen. David Wilson. Also present was MatSu Borough Mayor Edna and Noel DeVries, Wasilla Mayor Glenda Ledford, former Reps. Dick Randolph, Lindsey Holmes, and Ralph Samuels, former Sens. Bill Stoltze, Charlie Huggins, Gretchen Guess, and Scott Ogan; Sen. Shelley Hughes, Rep. David Eastman, House Speaker Cathy Tilton, former Green aides Portia Babcock Samuels and Jeff Turner.

Also present were congressional candidate Nick Begich, Cheryl Frasca, Chris Nelson, Dirk Craft, Palmer Councilman Richard Best, Renee Reeves, former Wasilla Councilwoman Gretchen O’Barr, State Senate candidate Jared Goecker of Eagle River, and others who were mentored or befriended by Sen. Green.

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Gov. Dunleavy recalled how he first came to know the senator while he was a school superintendent in rural Alaska, during a time when there were troubles at one of his village schools. He later got to know her when he ran for MatSu School Board and she hosted a fundraiser for his first run for Senate in 2012. Speakers described how Sen. Green could command a room with the raising of her eyebrow, and how much they admired her steadfast loyalty and resolve.

“From both sides of the aisle, Lyda was respected for her honesty, decorum, and conviction,” her family wrote. “Lyda will be remembered for engaging conversation, devotion to family, love of God, hospitality and welcoming nature, and fondness for sewing and gifting beautiful items.”



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Alaska

Burn Permit Suspensions Lifted for Tok, Delta, Fairbanks, Railbelt and Salcha Areas

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Burn Permit Suspensions Lifted for Tok, Delta, Fairbanks, Railbelt and Salcha Areas


Home AK Fire Info Burn Permit Suspensions Lifted for Tok, Delta, Fairbanks, Railbelt and Salcha Areas

With the return of cooler weather and wetting rains throughout Interior Alaska over the past 24 hours and with more in the forecast, the Alaska Division of Forestry & Fire Protection has lifted burn suspensions throughout Alaska and will continue to issue burn permits for the Tok, Delta, Fairbanks, Railbelt, and Salcha prevention areas beginning on Wednesday, June 12, 2024.

Please check https://dnr.alaska.gov/burn/fireareas or call the burn permit hotline listed below for the most current updates

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To access the Alaska Burn Permit Area Map, click on the map above.

State law requires those wanting to conduct any open burning on state, private and municipal lands from April 1 through Aug. 31 to get burn permits from the Alaska Division of Forestry & Fire Protection either online or at your local DOF office. This includes burning brush piles, using burn barrels, agricultural burning and burning of maintained lawns. Burn permits are NOT required for camping, cooking or warming fires less than three feet in diameter with flame lengths less than two feet high. However, it’s not suggested during windy days or when and where there are red flag warnings. 

You can also find more information about the Forestry burn permit program and suspensions at https://dnr.alaska.gov/burn

For current information on DOF Burn Permits, call the hotline at DOF Area Offices:

‹ BLM AFS Smokejumpers mobilized Tuesday to fire near Kiana
Wetting rains welcomed as progress made protecting cabins near the McDonald Fire ›

Categories: AK Fire Info, Alaska DNR – Division of Forestry (DOF), burn permit suspension, Fire Prevention, Fire Restrictions

Tags: 2024 Alaska Fire Season, Alaska Division of Forestry, burn ban lifted, burn permits, Delta, Fairbanks, Tok



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Alaska

First true taste of summer just around the corner

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First true taste of summer just around the corner


ANCHORAGE, Alaska (KTUU) – Things are much drier across Southcentral Alaska this morning, but additional rain will build into the region as we head throughout the day.

Unlike previous rain chances, Wednesday’s rain will largely impact the Mat-Su and the Copper River Basin. Rain will return to these regions through the mid-morning and early afternoon timeframe. While the rain won’t be as widespread as yesterday, be prepared for the likelihood that up to a tenth of an inch will fall for those locations.

Further south across the Anchorage Bowl and into the Kenai Peninsula, things will trend on the drier side. There is an outside chance Anchorage could see some rain into the evening, but that will largely hinge on how far showers dive south through the Valley. Any rain across Southcentral will taper off overnight into Thursday morning, with drier weather making a return to the region.

Southeast Alaska is already seeing the trend towards drier weather, although some isolated showers are possible through the Southern Inner Channels. We’ll see temperatures today topping out near 60 degrees for Southeast, with a gradual return to sunshine and warmth through the rest of this week. It’s looking likely that much of the Panhandle will see a stretch of drier weather, with the potential for highs to warm into the 70s over the next week.

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Wildfire activity across the state has been helped by recent weather, although the McDonald wildfire continues to spread. With temperatures warming into the 60s and 70s through Interior Alaska today, another round of thunderstorms looks likely into the evening. Any storms could be severe with the potential for gusty winds and large hail. Remember that any thunderstorm development means lightning strikes, which brings with it the potential for new wildfires.

The North Slope is still dealing with snow melt leading to rising waters. While some minor flooding is possible, many area waterways/rivers have either crested or are nearing their crest, with waters set to recede by the weekend. Additional snowmelt will still occur, as daily highs will warm into the upper 30s and lower 40s through the weekend.

Looking ahead to the close of this week, there are sure signs that warmer weather will head our direction. It’s looking very likely that daily highs will top out in the 60s and 70s, with a chance for thunderstorm development near the Talkeetna and Chugach mountains. Most locations should stay on the drier side, except for areas that do manage to see any storms.

Have a wonderful Wednesday and enjoy summer finally building into Southcentral.

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Unleaded Fuel Debate Reaches Alaska – AVweb

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Unleaded Fuel Debate Reaches Alaska – AVweb


An effort to speed up the transition to unleaded avgas has emerged in a state where elected officials are on record as trying to delay it. In an op-ed published in the Anchorage Daily News, the Alaska Community Action on Toxics says a drop-in replacement for 100LL is available now (G100UL) and two others are pending (Swift and VP Aviation) and calls a recent statement by members of the Alaska House of Representatives “full of falsehoods.”

The statement calls on House members to support a resolution giving Alaska an extra four years to comply with the apparent FAA/EPA agreement to have a fuel ready by 2030. The recent FAA Reauthorization did give Alaska an extra two years to get it done but the House members say that will “potentially devastate both commercial and private piston engine-powered aircraft operations.” Among the allegations made by the House initiative is that “many small piston engine aircraft could face costs of up to $100,000 per unit, rendering them economically unfeasible and jeopardizing the existence of general aviation in Alaska.”

Of course, cancelling GA in Alaska is a non-starter. Many isolated communities in the state are only reachable by air or on foot. Most of those places are populated mostly by indigenous people and that puts them disproportionately at risk from the effects of lead emissions. “With so many Alaskans put in harm’s way during aircraft operations, we might expect that our elected officials would push for the use of an unleaded alternative,” the op-ed says. “Instead, they are seeking to entrench leaded avgas by trying to undo EPA’s endangerment finding in Congress and to exempt Alaska from actions that could eliminate harmful lead emissions. 

Russ Niles

Russ Niles is Editor-in-Chief of AVweb. He has been a pilot for 30 years and joined AVweb 22 years ago. He and his wife Marni live in southern British Columbia where they also operate a small winery.

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