Connect with us

Sports

'I like to be in the spotlight.' Teoscar Hernández powers Dodgers to series win over Yankees

Published

on

'I like to be in the spotlight.' Teoscar Hernández powers Dodgers to series win over Yankees

This is what the baseball world was desperate to see.

Shohei Ohtani and Aaron Judge trading big hits early. Two talent-rich lineups keeping opposing pitchers under constant stress. And the sport’s two most star-studded squads turning a routine June weekend into a gripping midseason spectacle.

A day after neither team scored a run until the 11th inning, the Dodgers and New York Yankees traded early jabs in a back-and-forth game Saturday night, before the Dodgers ultimately pulled away late for an 11-3, series-clinching win.

Teoscar Hernández had the biggest night, collecting six RBIs and two home runs, including an eighth-inning grand slam that served as the knockout blow.

“I like to be in the spotlight, the pressure, those big situations,” Hernández said. “That’s what we play for.”

Advertisement

The result, however, was just as memorable as the scene that surrounded it.

For a sport that struggles to draw national attention and doesn’t lend itself to many show-stopping series over an annual 162-game grind, this weekend’s matchup provided a much-needed “shot in the arm,” as Dodgers manager Dave Roberts put it Friday.

Teoscar Hernández celebrates after hitting a grand slam against the Yankees in the eighth inning Saturday.

(Frank Franklin II / Associated Press)

Advertisement

And if the series opener was a tense, tactical extra-innings marathon, Saturday offered more of the power-packed prize fight everyone around Major League Baseball was hoping to see this weekend.

“This is a little bit different,” first baseman Freddie Freeman said in an on-field interview with Fox moments before first pitch, having to lean in to hear reporter Ken Rosenthal’s question over the buzz of the crowd in the Bronx. “It’s exciting.”

For the first seven innings, the two teams traded body blows to keep the score tight.

Hernández followed his winning double Friday night with a second-inning solo blast into the Dodgers bullpen to open the scoring.

The Yankees (45-21) quickly countered, knotting the score on two singles and a run-scoring grounder in the bottom of the inning.

Advertisement

In the third, Ohtani lined an RBI single the other way, putting the Dodgers ahead 2-1. Minutes later, Judge came to the plate and smacked a center-cut sinker just over the left-field wall, leveling the score again.

“It was a tight ballgame for quite some time,” Roberts said.

Kiké Hernández celebrates after hitting a home run for the Dodgers.

Kiké Hernández celebrates after hitting a home run for the Dodgers in the fifth inning Saturday against the Yankees.

(Frank Franklin II / Associated Press)

The Dodgers (41-25), however, eventually took control.

Advertisement

They regained the lead on Kiké Hernández’s solo home run in the fifth. They tacked on another run in the sixth, when Freeman hit a leadoff double to left that ex-Dodger Alex Verdugo badly misplayed.

Then, in perhaps the biggest sequence of the night, with the Dodgers leading 4-2 in the sixth, left-handed reliever Alex Vesia escaped a bases-loaded jam, then returned to the mound in the seventh and retired Verdugo, Judge and Giancarlo Stanton in order — including a strikeout of Judge on three whiffed fastballs.

“Felt like it was a shift of momentum for us,” Vesia said, “which was awesome.”

Teoscar Hernández made sure of that with his grand slam in the top of the eighth, setting off a raucous celebration in the bullpen (where his home run ball again landed), dugout (where Vesia jumped up from his seat and held an index finger to the sky) and stands (where waves of blue-clad Dodgers fans erupted as many Yankees faithful quietly filed out).

Dodgers reliever Alex Vesia delivers during the seventh inning Saturday against the Yankees.

Dodgers reliever Alex Vesia delivers during the seventh inning Saturday against the Yankees.

(Frank Franklin II / Associated Press)

Advertisement

“You don’t take over Yankee Stadium too often,” Roberts said. “But they did a good job of letting us know they were here.”

This series hasn’t been everything baseball fans hoped for, not with Yankees star Juan Soto out of the lineup again Saturday, and unlikely to play in Sunday night’s finale, because of a forearm injury.

It will still count as only three games in the standings, as well — relatively low stakes for a first-place team such as the Dodgers enjoying a healthy eight-game lead in the National League West.

Just don’t tell that to the thousands of fans who packed the ballpark, a lagging baseball industry at large looking for an early June spark, and a Dodgers team flexing their muscles against the club with the most wins in the majors.

Advertisement

“I think coming in here was a shot in the arm for our guys,” Roberts said, nodding in agreement when asked if the weekend has thus far met the hype. “To play a different opponent, to come in here and what it means to play in this stadium, it’s fun to see our guys play with a little bit more focus.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Sports

Christian Pulisic, Folarin Balogun score as Team USA takes down Bolivia in Copa América opener

Published

on

Christian Pulisic, Folarin Balogun score as Team USA takes down Bolivia in Copa América opener

The United States men’s national soccer team took care of its first Copa América opponent on Sunday night in a 2-0 victory over Bolivia at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. 

Christian Pulisic and Folarin Balogun found the back of the net as Team USA dominated Bolivia throughout the 90 minutes on the pitch. 

The U.S. was looking to make a statement in this Copa América, and taking an early lead against Bolivia, a team they were expected to beat on Sunday night, was the objective. 

Folarin Balogun (20) of the United States is defended by Jesus Sagredo of Bolivia during the first half at AT&T Stadium on June 23, 2024, in Arlington, Texas. (John Todd/ISI Photos/USSF/Getty Images for USSF)

Advertisement

Pulisic, the USMNT veteran, was the one who made it happen with just over two minutes gone in the match after the Stars and Stripes were awarded a corner kick.

Instead of sending a cross into the box, Pulisic made a short pass to Timothy Weah, who started to make his way toward the net. He dropped it to his right for Pulisic, who decided to take his first strike of the tournament toward the net, and it couldn’t have been better. 

Pulisic, trying to bend it from right to left, got the perfect height on the ball as he watched it sail over Bolivia’s goalkeeper and into the right side of the net. 

EURO 2024 DAILY RECAP: GERMANY, HUNGARY CLOSE OUT GROUP A WITH STOPPAGE TIME STUNNERS

The U.S.-heavy crowd was raucous as Pulisic celebrated his 30th international goal of his career with his teammates. 

Advertisement

The first half was slow from there, but things picked up again late when Pulisic got a through ball and ran quickly with 22-year-old Folarin Balogun in stride with him on his left. Pulisic dropped a pass to Balogun, who was trying to work against his Bolivia defender one-on-one.

Christian Pulisic kick

Christian Pulisic of the United States kicks the ball during the Copa América 2024 Group C match with Bolivia at AT&T Stadium on June 23, 2024, in Arlington, Texas. (Omar Vega/Getty Images)

After stepping to his left, Balogun drove a shot low, and it went through the defender’s legs and got past the keeper, who couldn’t stretch far enough for the save. 

Balogun’s 44th minute goal was the fourth of his international career, and it was all the offense the U.S. would need to come away with the victory.

There were multiple chances in the second half to tack on more, especially when Ricardo Pepi, who subbed in, had two chances right near the goal line, but Bolivia’s keeper made two incredible saves to keep the score intact.

But the United States was all smiles when the final whistle sounded, knowing they got the job done and earned the first three points of the tournament. 

Advertisement
Christian Pulisic celebrates goal

Christian Pulisic of the United States celebrates scoring with teammates during the first half against Bolivia at AT&T Stadium on June 23, 2024, in Arlington, Texas. (John Todd/ISI Photos/USSF/Getty Images for USSF)

Their next test comes later this week against on Thursday at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta.

Follow Fox News Digital’s sports coverage on X and subscribe to the Fox News Sports Huddle newsletter.

Continue Reading

Sports

Reggie Jackson on playing in segregated Birmingham in 1967: 'I wouldn’t wish it on anybody'

Published

on

Reggie Jackson on playing in segregated Birmingham in 1967: 'I wouldn’t wish it on anybody'

Reggie Jackson is a member of the Birmingham Barons Hall of Fame.

Before he became a five-time World Series champion and a Hall of Fame player, Jackson led the double-A Southern League with 84 runs, 17 triples, 26 doubles and 17 stolen bases in 1967, his only season with the minor league squad.

But Jackson’s memories of his time in Birmingham, Ala., are anything but pleasant.

“I wouldn’t wish it on anybody,” Jackson said numerous times Thursday while speaking on Fox’s pregame show for the first Major League Baseball game to be played at Rickwood Field, the historic former home of the Barons as well as the Negro Leagues’ Black Barons.

The St. Louis Cardinals beat the San Francisco Giants 6-5 in Thursday’s game, billed as “A Tribute to the Negro Leagues” in honor of all the great Negro Leagues players who played at Rickwood from 1920 to 1960. Willie Mays, the legendary Giants outfielder who died Tuesday at age 93, famously played for the Black Barons in 1948.

Advertisement

Asked by Fox analyst Alex Rodriguez about the emotions he was feeling in his return to Rickwood, Jackson spoke uninterrupted for nearly three minutes on what it was like to be a Black man in the Deep South in 1967.

“Coming back here is not easy,” said Jackson, who went on to have a 21-year big league career with the Kansas City and Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees and Angels. “The racism when I played here, the difficulty of going through different places where we traveled — fortunately, I had a manager and I had players on the team that helped me through it. But I wouldn’t wish it on anybody.

“I would never want to do it again. I walked into restaurants and they would point at me and say, ‘The n— can’t eat here.’ I would go to a hotel and they’d say, ‘The n— can’t stay here.’ We went to [Kansas City Athletics owner] Charlie Finley’s country club for a welcome home dinner and they pointed me out with the N-word, ‘He can’t come in here.’ Finley marched the whole team out. … Finally, they let me in there and he said, ‘We’re going to go to the diner and eat hamburgers. We’ll go where we’re wanted.’

“Fortunately, I had a manager in Johnny McNamara that if I couldn’t eat in a place, nobody would eat. We’d get food to travel. If I couldn’t stay in a hotel, they’d drive to a hotel to find a place where I could stay. Had it not been for Rollie Fingers, Johnny McNamara, Dave Duncan, Joe and Sharon Rudi — I slept on their couch three, four nights a week for about a month and a half. Finally, they were threatened that they’d burn our apartment complex down unless I got out. I wouldn’t wish it on anybody.”

Jackson spoke of a dark time in the city’s history, including the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church by white supremacists that killed four Black girls, ages 11 to 14.

Advertisement

“At the same time,” Jackson said, “had it not been for my white friends, had it not been for a white man in [Finley] and Rudi and Fingers and Duncan and Lee Meyers, I would have never made it. I was too physically violent. I was ready to physically fight [someone]. I’d have gotten killed here because I’d have beat someone’s ass and you’d have saw me in an oak tree somewhere.”

At that point, Rodriguez put his arm around Jackson, while fellow Fox commentator Kevin Burkhardt initially struggled for words in response to what he had just heard.

“Reggie, I — I can’t even imagine,” Burkhardt said. “It’s awful you had to go through that. But, hey, you know, appreciate you sharing the rawness and the honesty of it with our audience.”

“We love you, Reg,” Rodriguez said.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Sports

Legendary college football coach Lou Holtz rips trans participation in women's sports

Published

on

Legendary college football coach Lou Holtz rips trans participation in women's sports

Join Fox News for access to this content

You have reached your maximum number of articles. Log in or create an account FREE of charge to continue reading.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive.

Please enter a valid email address.

Having trouble? Click here.

Legendary college football coach Lou Holtz made his stance on transgender athletes’ participation in women’s sports very clear on Sunday.

Holtz fired off a post on X on the anniversary of Title IX.

Advertisement

Lou Holtz, former Notre Dame football coach, addresses the America First Policy Institute’s America First Agenda Summit on July 26, 2022. (Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)

“I was happy when Title IX came out,” the former Notre Dame coach wrote. “But here we are, many years later, and now we can’t even ensure women competing against women. 

“It’s crazy!”

Title IX was originally published on June 23, 1972. The law prohibits sex-based discrimination in schools and other education programs that receive funding from the federal government.

Advertisement

“No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance,” Title IX stated.

Lou Holtz in 1990

Lou Holtz of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish during an NCAA football game. (Focus on Sport/Getty Images)

TRANSGENDER ATHLETE COMPLAINS ABOUT LACK OF SPORTSMANSHIP FROM FELLOW RUNNERS AFTER WINNING GIRLS STATE TITLE

Recently, the Biden administration unveiled new Title IX rules zeroing in on safeguarding LGBTQ+ students and changing the ways in which sexual harassment and assault claims are adjudicated on campus.

The new rules stopped short on barring transgender athletes from competing against females in women’s sports.

Last week, a U.S. district court in Kentucky ordered the implementation of the Biden administration’s new Title IX protections halted after a West Virginia girl and a Christian Educators Association International sued over a transgender teen competing on a middle school team. The new injunction applies to Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Indiana, Virginia and West Virginia.

Advertisement
President Joe Biden

President Biden delivers remarks from the Roosevelt Room of the White House, March 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A federal judge blocked Biden’s Title IX rule in Louisiana, Mississippi, Montana and Idaho a week prior.

Follow Fox News Digital’s sports coverage on X and subscribe to the Fox News Sports Huddle newsletter.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending