Connect with us

Sports

Dodgers fans take over Yankee Stadium with large group outing

Published

on

Dodgers fans take over Yankee Stadium with large group outing

Join Fox News for access to this content

You have reached your maximum number of articles. Log in or create an account FREE of charge to continue reading.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive.

Please enter a valid email address.

Having trouble? Click here.

There haven’t been this many Dodgers fans in New York since the team moved out of Brooklyn in 1957.

The LA Dodgers are in the Bronx this weekend for a highly anticipated series against the New York Yankees. It’s one of the oldest rivalries in the game.

Advertisement

When the Dodgers were in Brooklyn, they faced the Yankees in the World Series eight times.

They’ve met three times in the Fall Classic since the move, and their 11 meetings are the most ever between any two teams despite not meeting there since 1981.

The Los Angeles Dodgers logo on a bag before a game between the Washington Nationals and Dodgers at Nationals Park April 24, 2024, in Washington, D.C.  (G Fiume/Getty Images)

Friday night had a postseason atmosphere in the Dodgers’ 2-1, 11-inning victory, and Dodger fans were scattered throughout Yankee Stadium.

Advertisement

But there was an invasion on Saturday.

A photo of numerous Dodgers fans lined up outside Billy’s Sports Bar surfaced just before 2 p.m. Saturday, close to six hours before first pitch.

VIEW PHOTO ON X

The group then received a police escort on the walk to the stadium gates.

VIEW VIDEO ON X

Advertisement

It turns out the invasion is from the Dodgers’ fan group, Pantone 294, named after the shade of blue that is the Dodgers’ primary color. The group also made the trip to the Bronx in 2016.

The FOX broadcast said that 5,000 members of the group were a part of the Bronx takeover.

Fans outside Yankee Stadium

Fans walk to Yankee Stadium before a game between the New York Yankees and Toronto Blue Jays April 5, 2024, in New York City.  (Dustin Satloff/Getty Images)

YANKEES-DODGERS SPLIT MERCHANDISE PROMPTS FIERCE FAN REACTION: ‘THIS SHOULD BE A FELONY’

The group is similar to a Mets fan group called The 7 Line, named for the subway train that stops at Citi Field.

The Dodgers got the first laugh Friday night, ending the Yanks’ eight-game winning streak. 

Advertisement
Ohtani running bases

Shohei Ohtani of the Los Angeles Dodgers scores a run in the 11th inning against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium June 7, 2024, in New York City. The Dodgers defeated the Yankees 2-1 in eleven innings. (Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

Yankees pitcher Nestor Cortes opposes the Dodgers’ Gavin Stone in Saturday’s game. 

Follow Fox News Digital’s sports coverage on X, and subscribe to the Fox News Sports Huddle newsletter.

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Sports

Shell yeah: Teoscar Hernández is the Dodgers' always-smiling, seed-throwing motivator

Published

on

Shell yeah: Teoscar Hernández is the Dodgers' always-smiling, seed-throwing motivator

The $23.5 million that the Dodgers are paying Teoscar Hernández this season isn’t just for the power and run production he provides, his ability to play the corner outfield spots and his boundless energy and enthusiasm on the field and in the clubhouse.

It’s seed money.

Whenever a Dodgers player hits a home run, Hernández showers the batter with sunflower seeds as he returns to the dugout, a tradition the 31-year-old from the Dominican Republic with the bushy beard and toothy grin started in Toronto a few years ago and brought with him to Seattle in 2023 and Los Angeles this season.

And if Hernández goes deep — like he did when his dramatic three-run blast to right-center field capped a seven-run ninth inning in an 11-9 come-from-behind victory over the Colorado Rockies in Coors Field on Tuesday night — another player will grab a fistful or two of seeds and toss them at the slugger.

“This game is hard enough — it brings too much stress — so you have to have fun,” said Hernández, who signed a one-year deal in January after the Mariners did not extend a qualifying offer last winter. “I know hitting a home run is good, but this is just a little extra motivation for the guy who hits it and for the other players.”

Advertisement

Hernández, who played six seasons (2017-2022) for the Blue Jays, doesn’t remember the exact moment he started the tradition because it was a spur-of-the-moment thing.

“Everybody had something to celebrate the homer, but we didn’t have anything at that time,” he said. “There was a bucket with like 20 bags of seeds in the dugout, so I just grabbed one and threw it in the air, and then everybody started doing it.”

There is a proper technique to the sunflower-seed shower, though, one Hernández had to school his Blue Jays teammates on.

Dodgers outfielder Teoscar Hernández is hit with sunflower seeds after hitting a solo home run against the Atlanta Braves in May.

(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

Advertisement

“Some guys at the beginning, they misunderstood, and they were throwing them hard,” Hernández said. “Sometimes you get them in the eyes, and sometimes you get them straight in the mouth. The key is to throw the seeds up and let them walk through them.”

Mookie Betts was the first Dodger to receive the sunflower-seed treatment after he hit the team’s first homer of the season, a two-run shot in a March 21 loss to the San Diego Padres in South Korea. The celebration quickly took root.

“I’ve seen a lot of home run celebrations, but I had never seen a sunflower-seed shower before,” Dodgers infielder Miguel Rojas said. “He started doing it the [second] game of the season with Mookie, and he’s been doing it ever since. It makes us feel really good. It makes everything more enjoyable. And that’s kind of what this team is about.”

It’s what Hernández has always been about. When Hernández hit a two-run double in the 11th inning of a 2-1 win over the New York Yankees on June 7 and a game-breaking grand slam in the eighth inning of an 11-3 win the following night in Yankee Stadium, the back-page headline of Sunday’s New York Post read: “Oscar the Grouch.”

Advertisement

But if Hernández were a Sesame Street character, he’d be Guy Smiley.

“I’m always laughing. I rarely get mad,” Hernández said. “You can go around and ask people, ‘Have you ever seen Teo mad?’ I don’t think they’re gonna say yes. Everybody knows the way I play on the field and act off the field. I’m the same person. I just like to bring joy and happiness to everybody so they can feel good and relax.”

“You feel the adrenaline, and you obviously get up for those kinds of games, when you play in the big moments, the big situations.”

— Teoscar Hernández

Advertisement

Hernández’s exuberance seems to have rubbed off on his teammates, and his attitude and approach seem suited for pressure-packed situations, as he showed during the much-hyped series pitting a pair of historic rivals and potential World Series foes in Yankee Stadium two weekends ago.

Hernández went six for 12 with three homers, two doubles and nine RBIs in the three games against the Yankees.

“Teo was on another level [in New York], on the biggest stage of the season so far, and it makes you excited, because that’s where we want to go,” Rojas said. “We want to get to the playoffs, to the World Series, where the stage is going to be even bigger. And we have a guy who can put the team on his shoulders.”

The Dodgers don’t necessarily need Hernández to carry them in October — they’ve added two-time American League valuable player Shohei Ohtani to a star-studded lineup that includes Freddie Freeman and Will Smith and is waiting for dynamic leadoff man Betts and slugger Max Muncy to return from injuries.

Dodgers outfielder Teoscar Hernandez throws sunflower seeds at teammate Mookie Betts.

Dodgers outfielder Teoscar Hernández throws sunflower seeds at teammate Mookie Betts during a game against the Giants in April.

(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Advertisement

But after their bats went cold in National League Division Series losses to the Padres in 2022 and the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2023, it can’t hurt to have another big bat with the potential to thrive on an October stage.

“You feel the adrenaline, and you obviously get up for those kinds of games, when you play in the big moments, the big situations,” Hernández said. “But I try to be the same guy, to be myself, and to not put pressure on myself. I’m not trying to do too much, because that’s when everything starts to go the opposite way that you want it to go.”

Hernández, who entered Friday night’s game against the Angels with a .261 average, .834 on-base-plus-slugging percentage, 18 homers, 16 doubles and a team-high 54 RBIs, has been solid in the clutch, batting .225 (20 for 89) with an .823 OPS, six homers, five doubles and one triple with runners in scoring position.

He’s batting .308 (four for 13) with a 1.154 OPS, two homers, one double and 12 RBIs with the bases loaded, his other grand slam coming in the sixth inning of a 5-1 win at San Diego on May 11.

Advertisement

“I’ve said it before, he reminds me a little bit of Manny Ramirez in the sense that when guys are on base, certainly with runners in scoring position, he’s even better,” Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said. “We’ve seen that all year from him. He’s sneaky been the MVP of our club.”

Teoscar Hernández hits a two-run home run against the Texas Rangers on June 11.

Teoscar Hernández hits a two-run home run against the Texas Rangers on June 11.

(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

“When you look back at last year, I was hitting the ball hard, but everybody knows how the ball travels at T-Mobile Park. Now, I’m hitting the ball hard and getting the production that I expect.”

— Teoscar Hernández

Advertisement

Hernández hit two homers and drove in four runs in a 6-3 win over St. Louis on March 29 homered and drove in all three runs of a 3-1 win over Miami on May 8. He was named NL player of the week after hitting .260 (nine for 25) with a 1.389 OPS, four homers, 10 RBIs, three doubles and six runs in six games from June 3-9.

“He’s been big, especially with Max being out,” right fielder Jason Heyward said, referring to Muncy, who has been sidelined since May 16 because of a rib-cage strain. “He had some big hits to start the season, some big at-bats, some big homers for us. No doubt, he’s helped hold things down.”

The Dodgers thought the right-handed-hitting Hernández would benefit from a change of scenery. Hernández hit just .217 with a .643 OPS, 12 homers and 44 RBIs in Seattle’s pitcher-friendly T-Mobile Park last season and .295 with an .830 OPS, 14 homers and 49 RBIs on the road.

“When you look back at last year, I was hitting the ball hard, but everybody knows how the ball travels at T-Mobile Park,” Hernández said. “Now, I’m hitting the ball hard and getting the production that I expect.”

Advertisement

While his plate discipline will never rival that of Yankees star Juan Soto, Hernández has been more selective than he was in 2023, when he hit .258 with a .741 OPS, 26 homers, 29 doubles, 93 RBIs, 211 strikeouts–third most in baseball — and just 38 walks.

His 92 strikeouts this season are the fifth-most in the major leagues, but he’s walked 27 times, lowering his strikeout rate from 31.1% last season to 28.4% this season and boosting his walk rate from 5.6% in 2023 to 8.4% in 2024.

According to Fangraphs, Hernández’s 29.3% chase rate, the percentage of pitches he swings at outside the strike zone, is down from last year’s 34.5%.

Teoscar Hernández watches from the dugout during a game against the Arizona Diamondbacks.

Teoscar Hernández watches from the dugout during a game against the Arizona Diamondbacks at Dodger Stadium on May 20.

(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

Advertisement

“They’re going down, little by little,” Hernández said of his strikeout and chase rates. “I think it’s experience, understanding everything you need to do to get better and to execute a game plan. One of my goals for this year is to bring the strikeouts down and increase the walks so I can get on base more. That way, I can help the team get better.”

Hernández’s productive bat has been a constant in the middle of the lineup — he and Freeman are the only two Dodgers who have started all 77 games — and his effervescent smile rarely takes a night or an at-bat off.

“I’ve seen him get frustrated about chasing a pitch, striking out in a big spot or making a mistake in the field, but he goes back to normal real quick, faster than anybody that I’ve ever seen,” Rojas said. “Then he’ll get excited when he does something really good for the team. That’s why it’s important to have a guy like Teoscar. He brings the energy.”

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Sports

Christian Pulisic, Folarin Balogun score as Team USA takes down Bolivia in Copa América opener

Published

on

Christian Pulisic, Folarin Balogun score as Team USA takes down Bolivia in Copa América opener

The United States men’s national soccer team took care of its first Copa América opponent on Sunday night in a 2-0 victory over Bolivia at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. 

Christian Pulisic and Folarin Balogun found the back of the net as Team USA dominated Bolivia throughout the 90 minutes on the pitch. 

The U.S. was looking to make a statement in this Copa América, and taking an early lead against Bolivia, a team they were expected to beat on Sunday night, was the objective. 

Folarin Balogun (20) of the United States is defended by Jesus Sagredo of Bolivia during the first half at AT&T Stadium on June 23, 2024, in Arlington, Texas. (John Todd/ISI Photos/USSF/Getty Images for USSF)

Advertisement

Pulisic, the USMNT veteran, was the one who made it happen with just over two minutes gone in the match after the Stars and Stripes were awarded a corner kick.

Instead of sending a cross into the box, Pulisic made a short pass to Timothy Weah, who started to make his way toward the net. He dropped it to his right for Pulisic, who decided to take his first strike of the tournament toward the net, and it couldn’t have been better. 

Pulisic, trying to bend it from right to left, got the perfect height on the ball as he watched it sail over Bolivia’s goalkeeper and into the right side of the net. 

EURO 2024 DAILY RECAP: GERMANY, HUNGARY CLOSE OUT GROUP A WITH STOPPAGE TIME STUNNERS

The U.S.-heavy crowd was raucous as Pulisic celebrated his 30th international goal of his career with his teammates. 

Advertisement

The first half was slow from there, but things picked up again late when Pulisic got a through ball and ran quickly with 22-year-old Folarin Balogun in stride with him on his left. Pulisic dropped a pass to Balogun, who was trying to work against his Bolivia defender one-on-one.

Christian Pulisic kick

Christian Pulisic of the United States kicks the ball during the Copa América 2024 Group C match with Bolivia at AT&T Stadium on June 23, 2024, in Arlington, Texas. (Omar Vega/Getty Images)

After stepping to his left, Balogun drove a shot low, and it went through the defender’s legs and got past the keeper, who couldn’t stretch far enough for the save. 

Balogun’s 44th minute goal was the fourth of his international career, and it was all the offense the U.S. would need to come away with the victory.

There were multiple chances in the second half to tack on more, especially when Ricardo Pepi, who subbed in, had two chances right near the goal line, but Bolivia’s keeper made two incredible saves to keep the score intact.

But the United States was all smiles when the final whistle sounded, knowing they got the job done and earned the first three points of the tournament. 

Advertisement
Christian Pulisic celebrates goal

Christian Pulisic of the United States celebrates scoring with teammates during the first half against Bolivia at AT&T Stadium on June 23, 2024, in Arlington, Texas. (John Todd/ISI Photos/USSF/Getty Images for USSF)

Their next test comes later this week against on Thursday at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta.

Follow Fox News Digital’s sports coverage on X and subscribe to the Fox News Sports Huddle newsletter.

Continue Reading

Sports

Reggie Jackson on playing in segregated Birmingham in 1967: 'I wouldn’t wish it on anybody'

Published

on

Reggie Jackson on playing in segregated Birmingham in 1967: 'I wouldn’t wish it on anybody'

Reggie Jackson is a member of the Birmingham Barons Hall of Fame.

Before he became a five-time World Series champion and a Hall of Fame player, Jackson led the double-A Southern League with 84 runs, 17 triples, 26 doubles and 17 stolen bases in 1967, his only season with the minor league squad.

But Jackson’s memories of his time in Birmingham, Ala., are anything but pleasant.

“I wouldn’t wish it on anybody,” Jackson said numerous times Thursday while speaking on Fox’s pregame show for the first Major League Baseball game to be played at Rickwood Field, the historic former home of the Barons as well as the Negro Leagues’ Black Barons.

The St. Louis Cardinals beat the San Francisco Giants 6-5 in Thursday’s game, billed as “A Tribute to the Negro Leagues” in honor of all the great Negro Leagues players who played at Rickwood from 1920 to 1960. Willie Mays, the legendary Giants outfielder who died Tuesday at age 93, famously played for the Black Barons in 1948.

Advertisement

Asked by Fox analyst Alex Rodriguez about the emotions he was feeling in his return to Rickwood, Jackson spoke uninterrupted for nearly three minutes on what it was like to be a Black man in the Deep South in 1967.

“Coming back here is not easy,” said Jackson, who went on to have a 21-year big league career with the Kansas City and Oakland Athletics, Baltimore Orioles, New York Yankees and Angels. “The racism when I played here, the difficulty of going through different places where we traveled — fortunately, I had a manager and I had players on the team that helped me through it. But I wouldn’t wish it on anybody.

“I would never want to do it again. I walked into restaurants and they would point at me and say, ‘The n— can’t eat here.’ I would go to a hotel and they’d say, ‘The n— can’t stay here.’ We went to [Kansas City Athletics owner] Charlie Finley’s country club for a welcome home dinner and they pointed me out with the N-word, ‘He can’t come in here.’ Finley marched the whole team out. … Finally, they let me in there and he said, ‘We’re going to go to the diner and eat hamburgers. We’ll go where we’re wanted.’

“Fortunately, I had a manager in Johnny McNamara that if I couldn’t eat in a place, nobody would eat. We’d get food to travel. If I couldn’t stay in a hotel, they’d drive to a hotel to find a place where I could stay. Had it not been for Rollie Fingers, Johnny McNamara, Dave Duncan, Joe and Sharon Rudi — I slept on their couch three, four nights a week for about a month and a half. Finally, they were threatened that they’d burn our apartment complex down unless I got out. I wouldn’t wish it on anybody.”

Jackson spoke of a dark time in the city’s history, including the 1963 bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church by white supremacists that killed four Black girls, ages 11 to 14.

Advertisement

“At the same time,” Jackson said, “had it not been for my white friends, had it not been for a white man in [Finley] and Rudi and Fingers and Duncan and Lee Meyers, I would have never made it. I was too physically violent. I was ready to physically fight [someone]. I’d have gotten killed here because I’d have beat someone’s ass and you’d have saw me in an oak tree somewhere.”

At that point, Rodriguez put his arm around Jackson, while fellow Fox commentator Kevin Burkhardt initially struggled for words in response to what he had just heard.

“Reggie, I — I can’t even imagine,” Burkhardt said. “It’s awful you had to go through that. But, hey, you know, appreciate you sharing the rawness and the honesty of it with our audience.”

“We love you, Reg,” Rodriguez said.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending