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Chiefs' Harrison Butker drills longest field goal in Super Bowl history, breaking record set in 1st half

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Chiefs' Harrison Butker drills longest field goal in Super Bowl history, breaking record set in 1st half

The first score of the Super Bowl turned out to be historic, but the record didn’t stand for long. 

Kansas City Chiefs kicker Harrison Butker drilled his second field goal of Super Bowl LVIII against the San Francisco 49ers, a 57-yarder that rewrote the record for longest kick in the “Big Game.”

And that previous record was hit in the first half by 49ers rookie kicker Jake Moody, who hit one home from 56 yards. 

Harrison Butker #7 of the Kansas City Chiefs kicks a 28 yard field goal during the second quarter against the San Francisco 49ers during Super Bowl LVIII at Allegiant Stadium on February 11, 2024 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

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On 3rd-and-14, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Brock Purdy was looking for Deebo Samuel deep, but the pass was broken up in the end zone.

That forced the 49ers to settle for a field goal, and Moody put his name alone in the record books – at least for a short while.

The Michigan alum drilled a 55-yard field goal to open up the scoring, giving San Fran a 3-0 lead in the second quarter. And it also turned out to be the longest field goal in Super Bowl history.

Moody beat the record by one yard. Steve Christie of the Buffalo Bills made a 54-yarder in Super Bowl XXVIII. But that game did not turn out in the Bills’ favor – and it was their fourth consecutive loss in the Super Bowl in as many years. The Dallas Cowboys won that Super Bowl, 30-13, as Emmitt Smith was named the MVP for his 132-yard, two-touchdown performance on the ground.

Jake Moody kicking in super bowl

San Francisco 49ers place kicker Jake Moody (4) kicks a field goal against the Kansas City Chiefs in the first half in Super Bowl LVIII at Allegiant Stadium.  (Mark J. Rebilas-USA TODAY Sports)

Butker, though, was called upon to cut into the 49ers’ 10-3 lead in the second half when he stepped into his 57-yard attempt that was almost blocked by the 49ers. The kick was low, but it got through the uprights to make it 10-6. 

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Butker remained a perfect 9-for-9 in the playoffs. 

SUPER BOWL LVIII: SPORTSBOOK EXECUTIVE TAKES DEEP DIVE INTO POPULAR BETTING TRENDS FOR BIG GAME

Moody was 21-for-25 in field goal attempts in the regular season and 3-for-4 from 50-plus yards.

The Chiefs marched right down the field in an attempt to get on the board, but Isiah Pacheco fumbled inside the red zone, giving the ball right back to San Fran.

Jake Moody after making kick

Jake Moody (4) of the San Francisco 49ers celebrates after kicking a Super Bowl record 55-yard field goal in the first quarter. (Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

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The Niners are looking for their first Super Bowl victory since the 1994 season. The Chiefs are trying for their third ring in five years.

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Two of Steve Garvey's former teammates just endorsed … not Steve Garvey for U.S. Senate

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Two of Steve Garvey's former teammates just endorsed … not Steve Garvey for U.S. Senate

In 1977, and again in 1978, the Dodgers lost the World Series to the hated New York Yankees. The third time was the charm: In 1981, the Dodgers beat the Yankees.

“Fernandomania” dominated the regular season, but Fernando Valenzuela struggled during his lone World Series start. He pitched a complete game — a 5-4 victory — but he walked seven and made a now-heretical 147 pitches.

The Dodgers’ cleanup hitter in that game, first baseman Steve Garvey, batted .417 in the World Series.

Four decades later, Garvey is running for the U.S. Senate. On Wednesday, two of his teammates from that 1981 championship team, endorsed — no, not Garvey, but Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Oakland).

Dusty Baker and Dave Stewart are among five former major leaguers listed as endorsers in an announcement issued by Lee’s office Wednesday.

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Lee is running fourth in polling for California’s vacant Senate seat, with Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank) comfortably ahead and Garvey and Rep. Katie Porter (D-Irvine) fighting for second. Election day is Tuesday, although early voting is underway. The top two finishers advance to the November runoff.

Lee’s announcement highlighted the endorsement of five former players for the Oakland Athletics, her hometown team. Stewart, who was born and raised in Oakland, was a four-time 20-game winner for the A’s and was the most valuable player of the 1989 World Series. Baker, who went to high school and college in Northern California, finished his career with the A’s in 1985-86.

“As a longtime A’s fan,” Lee said in a statement, “it means the world to me to have the support of A’s greats who have contributed so much to our community in Oakland and the East Bay.”

After the A’s unveiled plans to move to Las Vegas, Lee introduced what she called the “Moneyball Act,” which would strip Major League Baseball of its cherished antitrust exemption if a team that moves does not provide financial compensation to its old hometown. The bill was introduced last June; no action has been taken on it since then.

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Patrick Willis reflects after being voted into Pro Football Hall of Fame: 'No one can take that away from me'

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Patrick Willis reflects after being voted into Pro Football Hall of Fame: 'No one can take that away from me'

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When San Francisco 49ers legend Patrick Willis opened his eyes after his sister, Ernicka, brought him to his front door, his bright smile immediately came to his face. 

Willis stared at Pro Football Hall of Famer and fellow 49ers great Bryant Young, who was donning his gold jacket. 

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As a finalist for the Hall himself, Willis knew exactly what Young, the camera crew and everyone else present meant: He was voted into the Hall of Fame. 

Patrick Willis during Super Bowl LVIII between the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers at Allegiant Stadium on Feb. 11, 2024, in Las Vegas. (Perry Knotts/Getty Images)

After the smiles and laughs came the waterworks for Willis, who spoke to Fox News Digital after reflecting on that moment when he learned he was heading to Canton, Ohio. 

“One thing I can say now: To be voted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame, no one can take that away from me,” Willis said while discussing his love for CoachTube. 

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This was the third year Willis became a finalist, and after missing out twice, the thought naturally creeps in the brain: Is what I did good enough? 

HALL OF FAME CANDIDATE PATRICK WILLIS TALKS STEPPING AWAY FROM NFL IN HIS PRIME, WOULD DO IT ALL OVER AGAIN

Willis knows he was a great player during his career from 2007 as the 11th overall pick out of Ole Miss to San Fran. But he played eight seasons, ending his career surprisingly after the 2014 campaign. 

He no longer needs to think about the what-ifs.

“We always used to say at the end of the year when you look up on the stat sheet and see how many sacks you have, or how many interceptions, or how many tackles, they don’t recall how you got them,” Willis explained. “They just see you got them. It’s kinda what this feels like to me now that I don’t have that feeling like, ‘Man, what else did I have to prove?’”

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Willis told Fox News Digital prior to being voted into the Hall that he always played the game wanting “to be one of them,” referring to the legends that are forever enshrined in Canton with their gold busts. 

“If one person could remember me, that would be awesome. It seems like a little bit more than one is remembering, so I’m grateful for that,” he said. 

But walking away from the game at 30 years old was no easy task for Willis. He knew it was time, especially after playing just six games during the regular season in his final year. 

Patrick Willis on field

Walking away from the game at 30 years old was no easy task for Patrick Willis. (Perry Knotts/Getty Images)

As he looks back, there’s still no regret. 

“At the end of the day, for what it’s worth, you can always say what if, or you should have,” he explained. “But I was blessed to play the time I was given, and the results were what they were, and I’ll say judge me off those and not by what you think I could’ve done. If you’re going off those numbers, perhaps they’re good enough. 

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“At the end of the day, it’s up to those who are voting.”

The voters believes the 950 combined tackles, 733 of which were solo, 20.5 sacks, 16 forced fumbles and eight interceptions, two of which resulted in pick-sixes, were enough.

Willis admitted, “I don’t know what I’m going to say, or how I’m going to say it,” when he walks up on that podium at Hall of Fame Stadium later this year. He’s sure the emotions will be there, too. 

Patrick Willis looks on field

Patrick Willis of the 49ers on the sideline against the Dallas Cowboys at Candlestick Park on Sept. 18, 2011, in San Francisco. (Tom Hauck/Getty Images)

But like Willis said, no matter what you may think about him walking away early in his career, he did enough to earn eternal greatness. 

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LeBron James rallies Lakers from 21 down in the fourth to stun the Clippers

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LeBron James rallies Lakers from 21 down in the fourth to stun the Clippers

LeBron James’ tongue wagged after he glided from right to left to bank in a runner off one foot. He shook his head after he drained another three-point shot.

And in the end, James lifted two hands in the air in celebration.

“He,” D’Angelo Russell said “did him.”

In the final Hallway Series showdown between the Lakers and the Clippers — unless the Crypto.com Arena co-tenants meet in the playoffs — the NBA’s all-time leading scorer ensured the meeting wouldn’t be forgettable

Despite the Lakers trailing by 21 in the fourth quarter, James brought them all the way back, and when they needed to get one last stop to ensure the win, James was there to meet the challenge.

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Kawhi Leonard’s baseline jumper missed short with James’ hand in his face, the Lakers winning 116-112 on Wednesday night after it looked like a blowout loss was on the way.

Ten seasons ago, the Clippers and their coach at the time, Doc Rivers, hatched a plan to cover the Lakers’ championship banners to make the arena they share feel more like their home. Wednesday, one of those banners read “Give no quarter.”

No matter. James was there to take the fourth.

He scored 19 of his 34 points in the quarter while dishing out four late assists, the Lakers getting huge shots from Rui Hachimura and Russell as they walloped the Clippers 39-16 in the final frame.

James scored or assisted on 11 of the 13 Lakers field goals in the fourth to wrap the Hallway Series era.

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“Sicko mode,” Anthony Davis said.

In the second half, James guarded Leonard – the second-straight game where the Lakers adjusted by using him as a defender.

“Just got to do what I gotta do,” James said. “If I’m in a lineup, if I’m on the floor, I got to make plays. Sometimes I got to make even more plays. And tonight was one of those moments where I had to make even more plays in order for us to even get back into the game and then ultimately win the game.”

Before the game, It felt like there would be some kind of resolution Wednesday.

Clippers coach Tyronn Lue was frustrated, the team having lost two of three since the All-Star break. The Clippers had pushed to the top of the Western Conference earlier in the month, looking like one of the league’s title contenders.

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But losses to the Oklahoma City Thunder and the Sacramento Kings underscored slippage in execution and maybe some waning attention.

LeBron James beats Terance Mann for a basket in the second quarter.

(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

Lakers coach Darvin Ham also was frustrated, the team also having lost two of three since the break.

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A run to end the first half of the season had created momentum, the team looking like a threat to make the playoff field and avoid the play-in tournament. But losses to the Golden State Warriors and Phoenix Suns, plus a sloppy win against lowly San Antonio had the team trying to recapture rhythm.

The Clippers were looking to prove that their brief malaise was the kind of thing that happens to title teams — a let-up before refocusing for the final stretch.

And the Lakers?

“We needed one of these,” Ham said.

The Clippers, without All-Star forward Paul George and center Ivica Zubac, made a statement early, Terance Mann slamming a dunk over Davis in the opening minutes. And they reaffirmed it later, Kawhi Leonard walking into a three to extinguish a brief Lakers run in the second half.

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But there was no slowing James, not as he ensured the Lakers won the season series with the Clippers for the first time since 2012.

Rui Hachimura of the Lakers dunks over Terance Mann.

Rui Hachimura of the Lakers dunks over Terance Mann.

(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

The Clippers’ defense never fully activated, and the Lakers shot better than 50% for most of the game. But the stops for the Lakers never materialized, the Clippers hitting shots too often and too easily, Norman Powell ending the third with a buzzer-beating three in front of Austin Reaves, who was helpless to do anything other than roll his eyes in frustration.

But in the fourth, James was otherworldly — the Lakers winning the potential final fight as the road team in their building.

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“In the second half we got up and then we turned the basketball over, didn’t get back in transition, and then of course LeBron got it going and then offensively we weren’t very organized,” Lue said. “We didn’t get organized, we didn’t do things we were supposed to do and so I take full responsibility for that. Just making sure we’re organized, knowing what we’re supposed to do. And like I said, then LeBron exploded.”

James’ fourth quarter began with him three threes in four Lakers’ possessions, quickly flipping the blowout into a competitive game. And then as the Clippers’ began to adjust, he picked apart the defense, opening the door for Hachimura and Russell to finish the game off.

“He had to take the cape, tuck it under his seat on the bench, I guess. It was time for him to whip it out. He definitely did that, put the cape on, and just got aggressive and got into good rhythm,” Ham said. “He’s been shooting the ball extremely well this whole entire season. And that was just another case of it. Once he got in rhythm and with his playmaking skills, he sets the tone with his shooting and going downhill. But then once they start scheming and trying to hit double team late, he was able to pick them apart with the pass and that’s just who he is.”

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