Connect with us

Southwest

'I feel like I killed a child, and it was me.' I was victimized by gender transition

Published

on

Join Fox News for access to this content

Plus special access to select articles and other premium content with your account – free of charge.

Please enter a valid email address.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive. To access the content, check your email and follow the instructions provided.

Having trouble? Click here.

NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

While England has just made the informed decision to stop the devastating practice of allowing children to take puberty blockers, radical gender ideology continues to spread like wildfire across the United States. Under the guise of “compassion,” some states have taken this practice to the next level.  

Advertisement

One year ago, from Saturday, March 16, New Mexico Governor Michelle Grisham signed one of the country’s most extreme so-called “gender affirming care” bills into law, the “Reproductive and Gender Affirming Health Care Act”. The anniversary comes just days after leaked files from the world’s authority on gender medicine exposed a medical scandal that leaves me with permanent scars. 

The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) creates standards of care on gender medicine for the American Academy of Pediatrics, Endocrine Society and more.  

LYFT PARTNERS WITH TRANS WOMAN TO PROMOTE NEW FEATURE CONNECTING FEMALE, NONBINARY DRIVERS WITH RIDERS

Its guidance determines how countless doctors and clinicians treat their patients. Apparently, it’s also a factory of corrupt, unregulated and irreversible experiments on children.   

New Mexico State Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham signed a radical gender bill one year ago. (Photo by SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images)

Advertisement

Written and video discussions reveal WPATH members admitting that children cannot provide informed consent. They confirm that children with developmental delays and mental illnesses are being fast-tracked into gender transitions, suffering permanent damage — and sometimes death — as a result. 

WPATH members have the audacity to openly admit that many families don’t fully understand the effects of surgeries, hormones and puberty blockers when they agree to the transition, and that doctors don’t bother to hit the brakes and educate them. I can confirm this. After all, I’m one of their victims.  

I was born female and grew up in North Carolina. I discovered the transgender community online as a teenager and was persuaded to socially transition. I was only 17 when doctors started injecting me with testosterone. 

In retrospect, I was the perfect victim. I was young, impressionable, isolated and suffering from severe mental health issues, including anorexia, self-harm and attempts to end my life. Doctors told me transitioning was the cure for my emotional pain.  

My parents were against it, but were pressured to transition their daughter, or else “he” would commit suicide. They were emotionally manipulated, and not educated on the health risks.  

Advertisement

Surgery was discussed at my first consultation. I got a letter of recommendation from a “transgender specialist” who told me I was a boy and changing my body would cure my mental woes.  

Both my breasts were removed the next year. Throughout every step of my “treatment,” I never stopped feeling suicidal. I didn’t need a double mastectomy and testosterone shots — I needed therapy.  

None of my suicidal tendencies went away until I addressed the real sources of my suffering: I had been diagnosed with anorexia, Borderline Personality Disorder, and had survived a sexual assault.  

Having found help and matured into adulthood, I identify as a woman, but the damage is done. Testosterone has left my back, neck and shoulders on fire most days. My joints ache. My genitals are atrophied and painful. I will live a whole life never knowing how it feels to breastfeed a child.  

My liver is enlarged. It’s likely that I’m at increased risk for a heart attack and stroke. My voice is permanently changed. WPATH created a medical culture that tries to convince the most vulnerable among us that mutilation can be health care, and I fell for it.  

Advertisement

CLICK HERE FOR MORE FOX NEWS OPINION

I feel like I killed a child, and it was me. 

This can happen to your children too. Doctors working in New Mexico can be fined thousands of dollars for standing in the way of so-called “gender-affirming care,” even if it contradicts their professional opinions. 

I was born female and grew up in North Carolina. I discovered the transgender community online as a teenager and was persuaded to socially transition. I was only 17 when doctors started injecting me with testosterone. 

New Mexico is one of the most radical bills of this nature in the country, but it’s far from the only one. After the WPATH scandal, no state can claim in good conscience that pediatric gender transitions are “settled science.”  

Advertisement

I know from personal experience that a lot can change in a year. Thanks to a whistleblower at WPATH, the myth of gender medicine is busted. We can finally see the lack of science behind gender ideology. These files prove the medical community got it very wrong. 

I share my story because families need to understand what New Mexico’s “Reproductive and Gender Affirming Health Care Act” really means. It’s not a law to protect children — it’s permission to experiment on them.  

Maybe Gov. Grisham didn’t know a year ago, but she knows now.    

Read the full article from Here

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Los Angeles, Ca

Kid Cudi updates fans after breaking foot at Coachella: 'S–t got real'

Published

on

Kid Cudi updates fans after breaking foot at Coachella: 'S–t got real'

Kid Cudi is recovering after breaking his foot in the middle of his set at Coachella over the weekend.

“S–t got real yesterday,” the “Day’n’Nite” rapper said in a video message to fans on X, formerly Twitter, on Monday morning.

“This is what happens when a 40-year-old man tries to prance around onstage like he’s 26, like he used to do back in the day,” he laughed while lying in bed.

Cudi, born Scott Ramon Seguro Mescudi, got hurt after jumping off the stage during his show during Weekend 2 of the festival.

Advertisement

Video captured by fans shows Cudi taking a spill after he attempted to jump over a barrier to get into the crowd during his song “Memories.” He lands on his side and then is later seen carried off by two members of his security team.

The fall forced him to cut his show short.

“I learned a valuable lesson, no more prancing around, jumping off stages,” he continued in the post.

He assured fans that he’s okay, but a little sore.

“Yesterday was a lot of pain, but I’m doing better now.”

Advertisement

Cudi revealed that he broke “something” in his heel and is set to get a real cast later in the day as he had a temporary on during the video.

“This is a major setback,” he said after a deep sigh. “But I’m going to bounce back. Aight?”

He hopes to be healed before his Insano Engage the Rage World Tour starts in June.

Right now nothing has been canceled and he’s going to wait and see how things go.

“I don’t want to let you guys down,” he said.

Advertisement

The tour kicks off on June 28 in Austin, Texas, and makes its way to the Crypto.Com Arena in Los Angeles on Aug. 30.

Cudi ended his messages by telling his fans that he loves them and to “engage the rage” before blowing them all a goodbye kiss.

Continue Reading

Southwest

Oklahoma City bombing: FBI agent reflects on response to attack 29 years later

Published

on

Nearly 30 years ago, Ret. FBI Special Agent Barry Black responded to the worst homegrown terrorist attack in U.S. history with just a year of experience as a bomb technician under his belt.

Black was one of two FBI bomb techs in the entire state of Oklahoma, including Jim Norman, when he arrived at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, which housed offices for approximately 500 government employees, around 9:30 on April 19, 1995. Nearly half an hour earlier, at 9:02, ex-Army soldier Timothy McVeigh ignited a bomb that took a third of the nine-floor building, killing 168 victims.

“It was horrific and chaotic. The scope and magnitude of the destruction was something like I had never seen before,” Black told Fox News Digital of his memories of the attack 29 years later. “{I’ve] sadly seen similar since. But other than the first World Trade Center attack, the U.S. had not seen an attack like this.”

Black’s responsibility as a bomb tech was to “assess the scene,” he said.

BALTIMORE BRIDGE COLLAPSE: SALVAGE CREWS RACE AGAINST CLOCK AFTER FOURTH BODY FOUND, FBI LAUNCHES PROBE

Advertisement

Ret. FBI Special Agent Barry Black remembers what it was like to respond to the Oklahoma City bombing 29 years later. (FBI)

“We were told maybe it was an airplane crash or a gas main explosion. Clearly it was not. And … the scale was something that few had seen in this country,” the former special agent said.

The explosion registered a 6.0 on the Richter scale and was felt an estimated 55 miles from the scene, according to the Justice Department. It left cars upturned and damaged more than 320 nearby buildings.

The destroyed Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building

The explosion registered a 6.0 on the Richter scale, according to the Justice Department.  (FBI)

Among the 168 who perished in the attack, 19 were children, as the Murrah building housed a daycare on the second floor. The last of the deceased was a nurse who had been responding to the emergency when a piece of falling debris struck and killed her.

FBI JOINS SEARCH FOR MISSING KANSAS WOMEN IN OKLAHOMA

Advertisement

Black went into the building every week to pick up a paper paycheck. The tellers who handed him that paycheck every week “were all killed,” Black recalled.

Photos of victims who died during the Oklahoma City bombing in a memorial museum

Among the 168 who perished in the attack, 19 were children. (Joe Raedle)

His wife, a federal probation officer, was also in the building that morning, but she drove out at 9 a.m., two minutes before the explosion.

FBI DIRECTOR CHRISTOPHER WRAY CITIES INCREASED FOREIGN THREATS IN FISA REAUTHORIZATION PLEA: ‘ROGUES’ GALLERY

“I have been to a number of these catastrophic events. What makes this a little different is: this was in my backyard. These were people I knew. My wife was in the building. At 9:00, she drove out — two minutes before the detonation — and it was about an hour and a half before I knew she was OK,” Black recalled.

When he arrived, “the devastation was overwhelming,” he said.

Advertisement
Oklahoma City bombing

Ret. FBI Special Agent Barry Black said “the devastation was overwhelming” at the scene of the Oklahoma City bombing. (FBI)

“But as I did what we call the initial survey — kind of a walkabout to try to assess the damage and get a handle on what may or may not have occurred — I asked some of the security people … if they’d seen my wife, and I recall one specifically said, ‘Yep, I’ve seen her and she’s fine.’ Well, that sort of freed me up. He later told me that he had not. He just thought I needed to hear that she was OK. So, good, bad or indifferent, that’s what he told me. And it took a little of the load off.”

FBI DIRECTOR WARNS OF ‘ELEVATED’ PUBLIC, NATIONAL SAFETY; PUSHES FOR INCREASED FUNDING

While sorting through rubble for evidence a day after the attack, investigators came across the rear axle of a Ryder rental truck used to detonate the bomb with an identification number on it.

Barry Black stands next to the rear axle of the Ryder rental truck now displayed in a museum

While sorting through rubble for evidence a day after the attack, investigators came across the rear axle of a Ryder rental truck used to detonate the bomb with an identification number on it. (FBI)

“That morning, a reserve deputy called myself and the other bomb tech, Jim Norman, to that rear … axle, and he wiped away some grease, and we wrote down that CBI and then physically gave it to a runner who … took it to the command post,” Black recalled. 

From there, investigators were able to track down the fake name McVeigh used to rent the vehicle, and employees at the rental shop were able to help investigators put together a composite sketch of their suspect. Once the sketch was released to the public, a hotel employee in Junction City, Kansas, identified the suspect as 27-year-old McVeigh.

Advertisement

FBI DIRECTOR SAYS CHINESE HACKERS ARE ‘POISED TO ATTACK’ AS INFILTRATIONS REACH ‘FEVER PITCH’

A composite sketch of Timothy McVeigh next to a photo of McVeigh

Authorities were able to identify Timothy McVeigh just 54 hours after the Oklahoma City bombing thanks to a composite sketch. (FBI)

By April 21, authorities learned McVeigh was already in jail after a state trooper pulled him over about 80 miles north of Oklahoma City, just 90 minutes after the bombing, for a missing license plate, according to the FBI. He had a concealed weapon on him at the time and was detained.

Later on, federal agents found evidence of the chemicals used for the bomb on McVeigh’s clothing and a business card on which he had written, “TNT @ $5/stick, need more,” according to the FBI. Authorities also arrested Terry Nichols, who helped McVeigh make the deadly bomb.

FBI agents stand next to Timothy McVeigh wearing an orange jumpsuit

Federal agents found evidence of the chemicals used for the bomb on McVeigh’s clothing and a business card on which he had written, “TNT @ $5/stick, need more,” according to the FBI. (FBI)

Following 28,000 interviews that were conducted across the world, investigators were able to piece together McVeigh’s and Nichols’ motives for the horrific act: They were angry about the April 19, 1993, Waco siege, as well as the August 1992 siege at Ruby Ridge, according to the FBI and DOJ.

“I’m confident we know his motivation. It was intended to be the first blow in an upheaval and overthrow of the federal government,” Black said. “Intent is one of those things that’s intangible but required to prove. So there was a great deal of time spent looking into why he would do this. And the same is true whether it’s domestic or international terrorism. But his motivation was proven clearly.”

Advertisement
Constance Favorite, the mother of bombing victim Lakecha Richardson, prays in front of her daughter's chair in the Field of Empty Chairs sector of the Oklahoma City National Memorial in downtown Oklahoma City 11 June 2001.

Black said lessons from the FBI’s investigation into the Oklahoma City bombing are still relevant today,  (ROBERTO SCHMIDT / AFP)

Black said lessons from the FBI’s investigation into the Oklahoma City bombing are still relevant today, and those lessons are part of what he teaches as a professor at the University of Central Oklahoma Forensic Science Institute.

 

“There are specific things we would look for on scene, like parts of the bomb, parts of the vehicle that carried the bomb. And that information needs to get relayed quickly to the command post so that the larger, broader external investigation can begin. And that’s how we had McVeigh and Nichols in custody in about 54 hours after detonation,” Black explained. “It was a massive undertaking with law enforcement work[ing] very, very well together.”

McVeigh was executed in 2001 at age 33.

Advertisement

Read the full article from Here

Continue Reading

Los Angeles, Ca

Family of father of 5 devastated after he's killed in Southern California hit-and-run crash

Published

on

Family of father of 5 devastated after he's killed in Southern California hit-and-run crash

A Southern California family is searching for answers after a father of five was killed in a hit-and-run crash early Friday morning.

The victim — 44-year-old Anthony Molina — was walking home around 3:22 a.m. when he was struck by a vehicle on Marshall Boulevard near Elm Avenue in San Bernardino on April 19.

A security camera from the area picks up the audio of the crash but issues with visibility make it difficult to make out the vehicle.

Anthony’s family is heartbroken after the tragedy.

“I’m missing my son, look what you did to my son,” the victim’s mother, Sandra, said while fighting back tears to KTLA 5’s Carlos Saucedo. “No bringing him back anymore. I can’t believe this is being done to my son.”

Advertisement

Anthony’s death has left his family devastated, and his loss will also impact the community. The 44-year-old coached Little League in San Bernardino for more than 20 years. Anthony lived in his home for 28 years.

Neighbors in the area say speeding is all too common on that stretch of road, and are hopeful the city will add speedbumps to slow drivers down.

Authorities have not released any information about the suspect’s vehicle that was involved in the crash.

Anthony’s sister, Darling Vanessa Molina, is pleading for the driver to come forward.

“If you’re watching, turn yourself in,” she said. “My brother deserves to get justice.”

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending