Connect with us

Southeast

Florida woman sentenced to 5 years in prison for abusing Husky with rubber mallet: 'Dog lived in fear'

Published

on

A Florida woman was sentenced to more than five years in prison on Friday after she was caught on camera abusing a Husky.

Elizabeth Jaimes admitted to beating the dog with a rubber mallet. She was recorded on a hidden camera beating Kimberly Johns’ husky, named Maya.

Prosecutors said Jaimes moved into a home in Tampa with her boyfriend, his mom and his mom’s dog in August 2022. Prosecutors and Johns urged the judge to come down hard on Jaimes for abusing the dog, according to Fox 13.

“What she did to Maya for 151 days, my dog lived in fear,” Johns said during the sentencing hearing. “It’s a living thing and she just abused her and abused her, over and over.”

FLORIDA WOMAN CAUGHT ON CAMERA BRUTALLY BEATING DOG WITH RUBBER MALLETT

Advertisement

Elizabeth Jaimes was sentenced to more than five years in prison. (Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office)

Maya was a healthy dog when Jaimes moved in, but before long afterward, Johns began to notice cuts on the dog’s head and took her to the veterinarian, Hillsborough County Sheriff Chad Chronister said.

About a month later, Maya was taken back to the veterinarian for a twisted toenail. A month after that, the dog needed six staples in her head. A few days later, Maya again returned to the veterinarian because she was struggling to walk.

The veterinarian, suspecting some type of abuse, recommended that Johns set up a camera to capture what was happening to Maya.

“Not counting the ongoing abuse starting from August of 2020, the defendant struck Maya 38 times with a mallet and 26 additional strikes,” prosecutor Karry Becker told the judge.

Advertisement
Hillsborough County Sheriff Cruiser and two officers standing by police tape

Elizabeth Jaimes was recorded on a hidden camera beating a husky named Maya. (Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office Facebook)

The veterinarian who treated Maya said the husky had suffered fractured ribs and spinal injuries and that it appeared some of the dog’s bones had been broken and re-broken after healing, suggesting abuse likely happened before it was captured on camera.

Maya is now alright, but she is taken to the veterinarian for ongoing treatment for her extensive injuries.

FLORIDA MAN BIT CHUNK OF DEPUTY’S HEAD DURING ASSAULT AT MUSIC FESTIVAL: SHERIFF’S OFFICE

“I think it’s a miracle that Maya’s alive,” Dr. Jerika Brooks, Lead Shelter Veterinarian for the Pet Resources Center, said during the hearing.

Jaimes requested leniency, claiming she has post-traumatic stress disorder after previously being abused herself. She also said she does not remember the abuse of Maya that was captured on camera.

Advertisement
hillsborough county sheriff vehicle

Maya is now alright, but she is taken to the veterinarian for ongoing treatment for her extensive injuries. (Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office)

“I don’t remember what I did that day, and I’ve been going to therapy because I’ve never done anything like that. I’ve never put my hands on anybody, but that doesn’t excuse it. So I just wanted to apologize,” Jaimes said.

Prosecutors and Johns do not believe Jaimes felt remorse for beating Maya.

“One of us wouldn’t get away with it with a human, and she shouldn’t get away with it with an animal,” Johns said.

“I’ve been a prosecutor for almost 20 years, and I personally have never had a case that’s been this egregious,” Hillsborough State Attorney Suzy Lopez said. “The crime was appalling. It was shocking. And, of course, the fact that it was captured on video made it even worse. So the judge was able to see what it is that Miss Jaimes did to Maya. In Hillsborough County, animal cruelty will not be tolerated.”

Advertisement

Read the full article from Here

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Southeast

South Carolina family of boy, 13, who died by suicide sues Snapchat over sextortion scheme

Published

on

Join Fox News for access to this content

Plus special access to select articles and other premium content with your account – free of charge.

Please enter a valid email address.

By entering your email and pushing continue, you are agreeing to Fox News’ Terms of Use and Privacy Policy, which includes our Notice of Financial Incentive. To access the content, check your email and follow the instructions provided.

Having trouble? Click here.

This story discusses suicide. If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, please contact the Suicide & Crisis Lifeline at 988 or 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

A South Carolina mother is suing Snapchat after her 13-year-old son died by suicide last year.

Advertisement

The family says young Timothy Barnett took his own life April 6, 2023, at his Sumter home after he fell victim to a sextortion scheme on the social media app.

“On April 6 … it was a typical morning,” Betsy Hauptman, Timothy’s mother, told Fox News Digital. “My husband and I were waking up. The alarm went off at about 6:15. My husband got up first. He walked out the door. I was in the bathroom, and I got a phone call, and my husband’s like, ‘Hey, do me a favor, lock the door. Make sure the doors are all locked, and check on the kids.’”

Initially, Hauptman’s husband — Timothy’s stepfather — thought “someone was sleeping in the yard” but later realized it was Timothy.

SOUTH CAROLINA LAWMAKER EXPOSES DANGERS OF ‘SEXTORTION’ AFTER TEENAGE SON’S SUICIDE

Timothy Barnett died by suicide April 6, 2023, after falling victim to a sextortion scheme on Snapchat. (Handout)

Advertisement

“I woke up in a nightmare,” Hauptman, a mother of three boys and four stepchildren, said.

It wasn’t until about six months later that Hauptman realized her son had been the victim of a sextortion scheme on Snapchat. The FBI describes sextortion as a criminal act in which an offender contacts a victim online and coerces the victim to send explicit images or videos in exchange for either more explicit material or money.

AFTER MICHIGAN TEEN’S SUICIDE, NIGERIAN BROTHERS PLEAD GUILTY TO PLANNING DEADLY SEXTORTION SCHEME

“What happened to Timothy is devastating, and our hearts go out to his family during this unimaginable time,” a Snapchat spokesperson told Fox News Digital. “We have zero tolerance for predators abusing young people on Snapchat and are working constantly to fight this horrific activity. We use proactive detection tools to find and remove these types of criminals and work around the clock to support law enforcement investigations.

“We offer extra safeguards for teens to protect against unwanted contact and don’t offer public friend lists, which helps prevent predators from targeting a teen’s friends. We also want to help young people learn the signs of extortion and have launched in-app education to raise awareness of how to spot and report it.”

Advertisement
Timothy and his mom

It wasn’t until about six months after Timothy’s death that Betsy Hauptman realized her son had been the victim of a sextortion scheme on Snapchat.  (handout)

The FBI received more than 13,000 reports of online financial sextortion involving at least 12,600 victims between October 2021 and March 2023.

Hauptman said information about the sextortion scheme that resulted in Timothy’s suicide “was buried in the closed suicide case,” and she didn’t find out about it until her inner “mama bear” came out at her local police station.

“I had absolutely no clue what sextortion was.”

— Betsy Hauptman

But she and her husband do not take social media lightly. They did regular and random “spot checks” on their kids’ phones “at least twice a week” to make sure they were being safe on social media. During one such “spot check” on Timothy’s phone in November 2022, Hauptman found an inappropriate video from someone Timothy did not know on Snapchat.

Timothy and his mom

Betsy Hauptman and her husband did regular and random “spot checks” of their kids’ phones about twice a week. (handout)

“We talked to Timothy about the dangers of doing this. And I really kind of preached the whole sex trafficking aspect of it,” Hauptman said. “I don’t remember if we reported it or not, but I know for certain we blocked that account.”

Advertisement

AI ‘DEEPFAKES’ OF INNOCENT IMAGES FUEL SPIKE IN SEXTORTION SCAMS, FBI WARNS

She also confiscated Timothy’s phone until January, during which time she saw a general improvement in his attitude. When he got his phone back, Timothy “promised” to go to his parents if he ever came across anything like that video again, Hauptman said.

“Hindight’s 20/20, and I really wish that, at least, we wouldn’t have allowed Snapchat.”

— Betsy Hauptman

Hauptman’s attorney, Joe Cunningham, said “if these type of dangers” on Snapchat “were lurking in an apartment complex or in a neighborhood, they would be flushed out very quickly and effectively.”

A phone, several apps

About two-thirds of teen users on Snapchat said they’ve been targeted by sextortion scams. (Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

“Parenting right now does have its own challenges that are distinct from generations past, and to the extent that people are creating communities like Snap and then profiting off them by using children as their products, they have a responsibility to make sure that product is safe and that it does not put children in harm’s way by allowing these types of predators to contact and reach out to them,” Cunningham said.

Advertisement

WARNING SIGNS OF SUICIDE: WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT PREVENTION, RED FLAGS AND HOW TO DEAL WITH THE ISSUE

The wrongful death lawsuit filed in South Carolina federal court argues “Snapchat is defectively designed with features that make the platform unreasonably dangerous for minors like Timothy,” and that “[a]s a direct and foreseeable consequence of Snap’s unsafe design, lack of warnings, and inadequate parental controls, Timothy fell victim to a sexual predator who extorted him by threatening to share sexually explicit images Timothy had been manipulated into sending,” resulting in his suicide.

Timothy Barnett

The wrongful death lawsuit filed in South Carolina federal court argues “Snapchat is defectively designed with features that make the platform unreasonably dangerous for minors like Timothy.” (handout)

The lawsuit notes that Snapchat allows users to send photos and messages that “disappear” as soon as they are opened, though a user can also choose to make their messages visible for a longer period of time.

FBI WARNS TEEN BOYS INCREASINGLY TARGETED IN ONLINE ‘SEXTORTION’ SCHEMES

“Snapchat’s limited display time … encourages users to send photos depicting deviant behavior. Sexting is a prime example, but cyberbullying, underage alcohol consumption, and illicit use of narcotics are also commonly the subject of Snaps,” the complaint states. 

Advertisement

“A 2016 survey of pre-teens and teens ages 12-17 found that ‘d— pics’ were among some of the unwanted content that users — predominantly females — received while using the app.”

The complaint also noted that “[d]isappearing Snaps do not operate as advertised.”

Snapchat

Snapchat allows users to send photos and messages that “disappear” as soon as they are opened. (Nikolas Kokovlis/NurPhoto)

“Although designed to disappear after an allotted time, recipients possess the ability to save or record them at will,” the lawsuit says. “This is particularly harmful to adolescents, who rely on Snap’s representations when taking and sending photos, and who only learn after the fact that recipients have the means to save photos or videos. In many cases, this leads to sexual exploitation.”

GROWING SNAPCHAT ‘SEXTORTION’ SCHEMES TARGET YOUNG BOYS, EXPERT WARNS

South Carolina State Rep. Brandon Guffey, who lost his 17-year-old son to suicide after a sextortion scheme in July 2022, has spoken to Hauptman about their similar circumstances. Guffey sued Meta earlier this year after his son met a sextortionist posing as a girl on Instagram.

Advertisement

“Snap, along with these other social media companies, are allowing kids below 18 to agree to these contract terms. Snap even says it themselves that two-thirds of all of their teen [users] have been targeted for sextortion, and yet they have no protections in place. And not only that, they double down by adding AI, which has amplified the issue.”

Gavin Guffey in a graduation gown

South Carolina State. Rep. Brandon Guffey encourages those who may be the victim of sextortion to contact police. (Brandon Guffey)

“I really just want parents to stand up, stand together and voice their concerns,” Guffey said. “And if the big tech companies can’t listen by our voice, then we need to start making moves with our wallets. Stop investing into these companies. … Maybe it needs to be a social justice campaign to make them realize I don’t want to have to legislate all this. I believe in less government. I want the companies to do what’s right. And right now, they are not acting like companies that really give a damn.”

“[T]hey are not acting like companies that give a damn.”

— Brandon Guffey

An investigation into Timothy’s death remains ongoing.

Hauptman remembered her son as “a 13-year-old rugged and tough, tumbling boy.” He was “the life of the party,” she said.

Advertisement

“He was always the one to light up the room when he walked in. Typical middle child that craved attention. I remember when he was an infant … when his daddy was deployed, and he needed to sleep face to face with mom for those nine and a half months that Dad was gone,” she recalled.

Hauptman and Timothy

Hauptman remembered her son as “a 13-year-old rugged and tough, tumbling boy.” (handout)

He loved baseball and playing the saxophone. At one point, he declared himself “the man of the house” to his mom and asked her how she took her coffee. From that point on, he took it upon himself to make her coffee in the morning, Hauptman said.

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children has created a free service called Take it Down, which is meant to help victims of sextortion erase explicit images of victims or get bad actors to stop sharing them online. The tool can be accessed at https://takeitdown.ncmec.org.

The FBI encourages anyone who believes they may be the victim of sextortion or know someone who may be a victim to immediately contact local law enforcement or the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI (800-225-5324) or online at tips.fbi.gov.

Advertisement

Read the full article from Here

Continue Reading

Southeast

South Carolina agency gave child to 'monster,' according to lawsuit

Published

on

WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT

A South Carolina state agency that’s supposed to protect vulnerable children left a teenage girl “in the hands of a monster,” according to a lawsuit. 

Gregg Martin, a suspected predator facing over a dozen sex crime charges since 2022, allegedly groomed his victim, pumped her full of drugs and mentally and physically abused her for six weeks, the lawsuit says. 

The legal action targeted the state’s social service department and individual caseworkers for allegedly ignoring the victim’s mother’s “repeated requests” to remove her daughter from the home — even before the sexual abuse allegations came to light — and failing to ensure the Martin home was a “safe environment.”

“What that child suffered at the hands of a monster was just incredible,” the family’s lawyer, Debra Butcher, told Fox News Digital.

Advertisement

WATCH: SURVIVOR RECOUNTS ROLLER COASTER AFTER JUDGE TOSSED OFF THE BENCH OVER STUNNING RAPE CONVICTION DECISION

A ribbon-cutting for South Carolina Department of Social Services’ new complex in Cherokee County. (South Carolina Department of Social Services/Facebook)

Fox News Digital sent South Carolina’s Department of Social Services a list of questions, but a spokesperson declined to comment. 

“DSS does not comment on pending litigation or cases involved in litigation,” a spokesperson said in an email. 

Martin, 56, was arrested by the Richland County Sheriff’s Office in South Carolina as recently as March on warrants for alleged sex crimes against a minor in Gwinnett County, Georgia.

Advertisement

EXCLUSIVE: MOM OF SEX ATTACK SURVIVOR REVEALS DAUGHTER’S HEART-STOPPING TEXT

The Peach State criminal charges include use of computer services to seduce, solicit, lure or entice a child to commit illegal acts; electronically furnishing obscene material to minors and obscene internet contact with a child. That brings the total of criminal charges to 14 in South Carolina, most of which stem from the alleged abuse of the teenager in his care in 2022, plus at least three in Georgia, according to court records.

A judge revoked Martin’s bond in mid-April, and he’s being held in a Richland County jail. His lawyer couldn’t be reached for comment. 

Gregg Martin mugshot

Gregg Martin, 56, allegedly sexually abused a teenager and is facing over a dozen criminal charges in South Carolina and Georgia.  (Richland County Sheriff’s Office)

The teenager was initially removed from her home by the Department of Social Services as it investigated allegations of abuse and neglect against the girl’s father. 

She was sent to live with Martin, who was family of the victim’s best friend, despite her mother’s objections, according to a lawsuit filed in South Carolina in February by the Foster Care Abuse Law Firm. 

Advertisement

AIRLINE BLAMES 9-YEAR-OLD GIRL WHO ‘SHOULD HAVE KNOWN’ FLIGHT ATTENDANT HID CAMERA UNDER TOILET: COURT DOCS

But the victim’s family believed it couldn’t say no after Protective Services allegedly “threatened” to place her in foster care and essentially strong-armed them into signing a safety plan. 

A safety plan, also known as an alternate living arrangement, typically places a child with another relative or close family friend during an abuse investigation, one of the family’s lawyers, Robert Butcher, explained to Fox News Digital. 

Robert and Debra Butcher

Robert and Debra Butcher, lawyers of the Foster Care Abuse Law Firm, which took on South Carolina’s Department of Social Services in several lawsuits, spoke to Fox News Digital. (Zoom/Chris Eberhart)

Text message evidence

A teenage sexual abuse victim’s mom pleaded with the South Carolina Department of Social Services to get her daughter out of an alleged predator’s home. (Foster Care Abuse Law Firm)

In this case, the state placed her in the hands of Martin for about five to six weeks. 

During that time, no one from the agency checked on her, according to the lawsuit, which allowed Martin to allegedly shoot explicit photos of his victim and abuse her, Debra Butcher said.

Advertisement

US FUGITIVE BECAME A SERIAL KILLER IN CANADA WHILE RUNNING FROM FEDS: 4 MURDERS AND COUNTING

“DSS (Department of Social Services) not once came out to that home,” Butcher said. “All these five weeks or so, her mom kept saying, ‘My husband can move out of the house. We can put her with a relative. We put her with a neighbor. … We don’t want her to stay there [in the Martin home].’”

Text message evidence

A teenage sexual abuse victim’s mom pleaded with the South Carolina Department of Social Services to get her daughter out of an alleged predator’s home. (Foster Care Abuse Law Firm)

This was even before the criminal allegations bubbled to the surface. 

Texts between the mom and a caseworker, exclusively obtained by Fox News Digital, allegedly show how hard the teen’s mom fought to get her daughter back. 

FUGITIVE LEFT CREEPY MESSAGES TO HIS VICTIM AND WENT ON THE RUN FOR OVER A DECADE

Advertisement

In multiple texts from late February to mid-March 2022, the victim’s mom said her daughter’s father would move out if her daughter could return home. She also left voicemails, Debra Butcher said. 

“I have been trying to communicate with you since 2/23 and have not yet heard from you,” the mom texted the caseworker. “Is everything ok? I’m concerned by the lack of communication.”

Text message evidence

A teenage sexual abuse victim’s mom pleaded with the South Carolina Department of Social Services to get her daughter out of an alleged predator’s home. (Foster Care Abuse Law Firm)

Text message evidence

A teenage sexual abuse victim’s mom pleaded with the South Carolina Department of Social Services to get her daughter out of an alleged predator’s home. (Foster Care Abuse Law Firm)

Text message evidence

A teenage sexual abuse victim’s mom pleaded with the South Carolina Department of Social Services to get her daughter out of an alleged predator’s home. (Foster Care Abuse Law Firm)

Another week passed without an answer. Again, the victim’s mom texted the caseworker and begged her to respond. 

“I don’t understand the delay in this and why no one is calling us and responding to our requests,” her mom said in a text. 

After about a dozen messages — most of which went unanswered — the caseworker said they couldn’t remove the victim from Martin’s home because the paperwork was already signed. 

Advertisement

‘THERE’S A REAL HUMAN COST’ AS COLLEGE RAPE SURVIVOR PUT HERSELF IN THE SPOTLIGHT FOR JUSTICE

About six weeks after protective services left the victim with Martin, a new caseworker took over and moved the child out of Martin’s house, Debra Butcher said, and the victim and her mom were finally able to talk “freely.” 

That’s when “the child disclosed what happened,” Debra said, and Martin was arrested shortly thereafter. 

Text message evidence

A teenage sexual abuse victim’s mom pleaded with the South Carolina Department of Social Services to get her daughter out of an alleged predator’s home. (Foster Care Abuse Law Firm)

Text message evidence

A teenage sexual abuse victim’s mom pleaded with the South Carolina Department of Social Services to get her daughter out of an alleged predator’s home. (Foster Care Abuse Law Firm)

The trauma still haunts the victim more than two years later. 

“She spoke about this, probably two weeks ago. And when she finished, she had to get up and leave and was in tears and shaking,” Debra said. “It’s still very traumatic for her.”

Advertisement

Pervasive exams that ‘make children feel like they’ve been raped’

The Foster Care Abuse Law Firm has three — soon to be four — other lawsuits alleging the state agency conducted unnecessary, invasive exams on children under the guise of checking to see if children were sexually abused. 

But there were no allegations of abuse, or physical symptoms to suggest sexual trauma, according to the lawsuits.

WATCH: BODYCAM FROM QUIET TOWN SHOWS GUNMAN CHARGE OFFICERS: ‘THIS IS YOU, THIS AIN’T ME’

All the legal actions against two groups and four doctors were filed in South Carolina as recently as May 15 and reviewed by Fox News Digital. Robert said a fourth lawsuit is in the works but hasn’t been filed yet. 

The language and allegations are similar in each lawsuit, and the victims are young girls and boys. 

Advertisement
The South Carolina Department of Social Services said they don't comment on pending litigation, but are facing several filed by the Foster Care Abuse Law Firm.

The South Carolina Department of Social Services said it does not comment on pending litigation. It is facing several lawsuits filed by the Foster Care Abuse Law Firm. (South Carolina Department of Social Services)

The legal action includes serious allegations the lawyers said is “essentially rape,” and asks the courts to stop the defendants “from performing unnecessary and intrusive pediatric genitourinary exams … when there are no allegations, or even suspicions of sexual abuse. … As a direct result of longstanding, well-documented failures of defendants … children … have been and continue to be harmed physically, psychologically and emotionally and continue to be placed at ongoing risk of such harm.”

Robert Butcher said it’s concerning there are “possibly hundreds of thousands of images of children’s genitalia” in the possession of Prisma Health, which was named as one of the defendants. 

‘LAUGHING’ SUSPECT IN LSU STUDENT ATTACK INDICTED ON VIDEO RECORDING

Prisma Health said it does not comment on ongoing litigation. 

The alleged exams described by the Butchers are graphic and disturbing. Their bodies are exposed and physically probed, according to the lawyers. 

Advertisement

“Sometimes, in the process of wanting to do good, some of these folks are doing harm to these kids,” Robert Butcher said. 

“This is sexual abuse,” Debra Butcher said. 

Each of the lawsuits implores the courts to prohibit the Department of Social Services and Prisma Health from performing these types of exams without allegations. 

Advertisement

Read the full article from Here

Continue Reading

Southeast

Retired South Carolina Army vet whose geologist son vanished without a trace running for Congress

Published

on

David Robinson upended his life after terrorists attacked America on Sept. 11, 2001, selling his trucking business to join the Army, where he served two tours in Afghanistan before suffering injuries in an IED blast.

“I joined the military when duty called to fight for our country, defend our democracy, defend our way of life,” he told Fox News Digital. 

Decades later, his life changed again when his geologist son vanished without a trace from a well site in Arizona. Now he’s running for Congress with a focus on missing persons across the country.

He served as a combat engineer until he retired from the Army and moved on to open a new business in his hometown of Columbia, South Carolina, he said. But his son’s disappearance sent him to another desert, this one on the other side of the country, in search of answers.

ARMY VET SAYS NEW EVIDENCE SUGGESTS FOUL PLAY IN UNSOLVED DISAPPEARANCE OF SCIENTIST SON

Advertisement

Missing geologist Daniel Robinson, left, and his father, David Robinson II, are shown in this undated photo provided by the family. (David Robinson II)

“I’m sitting right here in this very seat, and I see that phone call from Arizona. My daughter called me, and I ended up in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona,” he told Fox News Digital. 

“My journey from there came to a point of running [for Congress], when you get sick and tired,” he said. 

He wasn’t making progress in the search for his son, he said, but he was meeting more and more families of missing Americans. 

Advertisement
David Robinson sitting on rock

Daniel Robinson is shown in this undated photo provided by his father. (David Robinson II)

“I had families out there with missing loved ones of their own,” he said. “You learn a lot. … I went to meetings with the telecommunications [companies], talking to the senators, to you name it, law enforcement agencies. And I learned the ins and outs of things that are not being correct, the policies and the laws that are in place that actually hurt efforts to find missing Americans.”

One problem with the way cases are investigated is how phone records are approached, he said. Telecommunications companies usually ask to see a warrant before providing information such as cellphone pings, he said.

MISSING ARIZONA GEOLOGIST DANIEL ROBINSON: A FATHER’S UNENDING SEARCH FOR HIS SON, 1 YEAR LATER

David Robinson and Candice Cooley pose in a hallway at a conference center

David Robinson, right, is shown with Candice Cooley, whose son, Dylan Rounds, vanished from his own Utah farm and was later found to have been killed by a squatter next door. They are part of a community of parents of young Americans who went missing. (Michael Ruiz/Fox News Digital)

FOLLOW THE FOX TRUE CRIME TEAM ON X

“Sometimes when that happens, it’s too late,” he said. “The other problem is law enforcement cannot do it unless it’s a criminal case, or they fear that a person is in severe danger, or something’s out of order.” 

Advertisement

In cases like his son’s, although the circumstances remain a mystery, there wasn’t a probable cause right away, he said. His wrecked Jeep wasn’t discovered until almost a month after he went missing. But his son’s phone account was under his daughter’s name, and she paid the bill.

“That’s problematic for a family,” he said. 

MISSING ARIZONA GEOLOGIST: NEW DETAILS RELEASED IN DISAPPEARANCE OF DANIEL ROBINSON

He would propose legislation that makes data on an account available to the person paying the bill immediately, he said. Or at least to law enforcement upon the account owner’s request – with exceptions built in for domestic violence cases.

David Robinson on stage along with the parents of Gabby Petito and Candice Cooley, the mother of Dylan Rounds

David Robinson, center, takes part in a panel discussion with the parents of Gabby Petito and Dylan Rounds, two other young Americans who went missing under suspicious circumstances. (Michael Ruiz/Fox News Digital)

Data retention is another issue. If police don’t get a warrant in time, crucial information might be lost, he said.

Advertisement

There are other, traditional issues in his campaign platform as well, ranging from education in his district to the cost of prescription drugs, abortion and climate change.

Daniel Robinson, a geologist working for an energy company in Arizona, vanished from a remote job site in June 2021.

SIGN UP TO GET TRUE CRIME NEWSLETTER

Daniel Robinson's jeep and Daniel Robinson

These images show Daniel Robinson’s crashed 2017 Jeep Renegade and Daniel Robinson in an undated photo. (Buckeye Police Department)

Buckeye police last year published more than 120 pages of investigators’ records in the case, which remains unsolved.

“There was no indication of foul play,” a detective wrote in a supplemental report, but there was also “no indication that Daniel had packed and planned a trip.”

Advertisement

On July 19, 2021, a rancher located Robinson’s 2017 Jeep Renegade battered and rolled onto its passenger side in a ravine. The vehicle had front-end impact damage, a broken driver’s side window and a missing piece of its roof. It was still in drive. There was no blood inside.

Police found clothes, Robinson’s phone and work computer inside. His wallet had no cash inside. But there was no sign of the missing geologist.

Daniel Robinson with hard hat on

Daniel Robinson is shown in this undated photo provided by his father. (David Robinson II)

GET REAL TIME UPDATES DIRECTLY ON THE TRUE CRIME HUB 

Robinson faces an uphill battle, however. He is running as a Democrat in a district that has consistently elected a Republican to Congress since 1965.

The seat is currently held by Rep. Joe Wilson, a fellow Army veteran who first won the office in 2001.

Advertisement

Both men are running in their respective parties’ primary elections, scheduled for June 11.



Read the full article from Here

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending