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“It is with a heavy heart that Bo & Ivy, a veteran-owned and woman operated, independent distillery based in Washington, DC, announces the closure of its operations on March 31, 2024.” – PoPville

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“It is with a heavy heart that Bo & Ivy, a veteran-owned and woman operated, independent distillery based in Washington, DC, announces the closure of its operations on March 31, 2024.” – PoPville


via Bo & Ivy

From a press release:

“It is with a heavy heart that Bo & Ivy, a veteran-owned and woman operated, independent distillery based in Washington, DC, announces the closure of its operations on March 31, 2024. The Cocktail Room, spirits tastings, and tours into the heart of the distillery are closed effective immediately. The decision to cease operations comes as a result of challenging economic headwinds and difficulties securing distribution.

Bo & Ivy, founded with a passion for crafting exceptional spirits, garnered immense respect within the industry and among consumers. Over the past year, the distillery has achieved significant milestones, earning 10 awards for its gin, vodka, whiskey and bourbon. This recognition is a testament to Bo & Ivy’s unwavering commitment to quality and consistency.

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The closure of Bo & Ivy is a difficult but necessary decision prompted by economic challenges that have affected the business. Despite the widespread acclaim for its products and the dedicated efforts of the entire Bo & Ivy team, the distillery found itself navigating a landscape of financial constraints that make the continuation of operations untenable.

Bo & Ivy expresses gratitude to its loyal customers, partners, and the community for the overwhelming support throughout its journey. The distillery has been proud to be a part of the Ivy City scene and to contribute to the local and national spirits community.

“We are deeply saddened to make this announcement. When we set out on this journey we said it would go one of two ways and we never wanted to wonder which one,” said Julia Fletcher, Founder and GM of Bo & Ivy. “We want to express our heartfelt appreciation to everyone who has been a part of the Bo & Ivy family – our customers, partners, and the incredible team that has poured their passion into creating exceptional spirits and experiences.”

In a positive turn, the distillery space currently occupied by Bo & Ivy will be assumed by Cotton & Reed, the local distillery that specializes in rum production. Cotton & Reed looks forward to continuing the legacy of craft spirits in this space and serving the Washington, DC community. Cotton & Reed will also continue operations at its existing facility in the Union Market District.

Bo & Ivy will continue to operate until March 31, 2024, offering its renowned products to customers until the closure date. Please check the distillery website and Instagram for additional information. The distillery encourages patrons to take advantage of this time to savor and stock up on their favorite Bo & Ivy spirits. Private barrel clients will continue to have their spirits cared for by the team.”

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Washington, D.C

Sun is scarcely seen Saturday, but micromoon was spotted

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Sun is scarcely seen Saturday, but micromoon was spotted


Clouds covered the sky in the District for much of Saturday, but they permitted appearances by the sun at times and even allowed a glimpse of the almost-full moon, which shone from about as far away as it ever gets.

So, by many standards, including meteorological objectivity, Saturday — even for the strictest of critics and even with its light evening rain — seemed hard to fault.

The high temperature reached 53 degrees. That was 1 degree above Friday’s reading, and 3 degrees warmer than the District’s average high temperature for Feb. 24, which is 50 degrees.

Saturday seemed to suggest that Washington is making normal, if not especially swift, progress toward spring. More sunshine might have been asked, but atmospheric perfection is not guaranteed in the capital in late February.

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A certain breeziness existed, and coincided with an evening rain shower, that may have succeeded in stamping Saturday as a slightly wintry way station on the way to warmer weather.

But the day’s greatest distinction for watchers of the skies may have been in the appearance of the moon, at a notable time, place and phase in its monthly orbit around Earth.

In the earliest hours of Saturday, the moon seemed to occupy a patch of sky that was free of clouds. It seemed almost directly above the District, beaming from so steep an angle as to require a maximum tilt of the head to catch sight of it.

In only a few hours, it would reach the phase of geometrical fullness with the maximum amount of its face illuminated by the unseen sun. But a few minutes after midnight, it seemed difficult to detect in any way that it fell short of being totally full.

What was striking, however, was how small the moon seemed. But although striking, it was not surprising. On Saturday morning, the moon was about as far as it ever gets from Earth on its monthly orbit, and distant objects appear smaller.

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When it is at or near both its greatest fullness and its farthest distance, it is called a micromoon in recognition of its slightly smaller appearance.

It seemed almost like the pupil of some celestial eye with the colors reversed. Instead of the eye’s dark circle of a pupil surrounded by the brighter iris, the moon appeared something like a small, bright round window surrounded by darkness.

And it was not so far, or so small, of course, that the darker lunar seas could not be seen.



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Local Ukrainians rally in Washington, D.C. on 2nd anniversary of Russian invasion

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Local Ukrainians rally in Washington, D.C. on 2nd anniversary of Russian invasion


WASHINGTON, D.C. – A group of Hampton Roads-based Ukrainians traveled to Washington D.C. on Saturday for a rally marking two years since Russia invaded.

Members of the Tidewater Ukrainian Cultural Association joined others from their country, representatives from the Ukrainian Embassy and American supporters at the Lincoln Memorial.

The event began at 2 p.m.

Valentyna Sonmezler, a Ukrainian living in Virginia Beach, has been speaking out against the war since it broke out in February 2022. She spoke to News 3 via FaceTime before the Saturday rally.

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Raymond Campos/WTKR

“Democracy in the world is in danger. That’s why it is important to keep supporting Ukraine and that’s why we are here today to ask to provide supplemental aid to Ukraine,” she said.

But while Congress debates whether to continue sending money and other aid to Ukraine, she insists the rally is also in recognition of the support the United States has already sent.

“The level of appreciation Ukrainians have for Americans is raising every day. They count on us here,” said Sonmezler. “Ukraine choose to be with the Western world. Ukraine choose to be with America.”

According to social media, the rally would also include a march from the Lincoln Memorial to the home of the Russian ambassador.

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AG Moody heads to DC for SCOTUS tech case Monday

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AG Moody heads to DC for SCOTUS tech case Monday


Expect the state’s chief legal officer to talk to media about the case.

Florida’s chief legal officer will be in Washington, D.C. Monday, as a Supreme Court case she is involved in will have legal arguments.

Ashley Moody plans to talk to reporters in the Nation’s Capital that day about the Moody v. NetChoice case, which will have oral arguments earlier in the morning.

The case revolves around Florida law passed in 2021’s SB 7072 “that attempts to prevent social-media companies from abusing their enormous power to censor speech.”

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The state of Florida seeks guidance on whether “the First Amendment prohibits a State from requiring that social-media companies host third-party communications, and from regulating the time, place, and manner in which they do so” and whether “the First Amendment prohibits a State from requiring social-media companies to notify and provide an explanation to their users when they censor the user’s speech.”

Moody filed an appeal in 2022 asking the Supreme Court to overturn a ruling from the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, which in May ruled Florida’s law unconstitutional on the basis that the First Amendment likely protects a social media company’s right to moderate the content on its platform. Contemporaneously, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals issued a conflicting ruling over a similar Texas law.

In her appeal, Moody wrote that the 11th Circuit ruling “strips states of their historic power to protect their citizens’ access to information, implicating questions of nationwide importance.”

Gov. Ron DeSantis named the bill a priority ahead of the 2021 Legislative Session after Twitter and other prominent social media companies banished then-President Donald Trump and other conservatives from their platforms following the U.S. Capitol riot. Proponents have likened Big Tech’s handling of users’ content to censorship.

DeSantis unveiled the proposal days after Trump left office and moved to Florida full-time. Ironically, Trump’s use of social media was one of the things that helped to sink DeSantis’ presidential campaign thereafter.

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Renzo Downey contributed reporting.

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