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11 Fun Ways to Get on the Water This Summer

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11 Fun Ways to Get on the Water This Summer


Whitlow’s on Water is the biggest boat in Sea Suite Cruises’ fleet. Photograph by Jack Walten.

All aboard! A great way to take in the views of DC’s majestic monuments and landmarks is on a boat adventure. Here’s a list of fun water trips to add to your summer plans:

Go hydro biking

Potomac Ave., SE  and 710 Wharf St., SW

Boating in DC offers a unique experience: biking on the water while balancing on two floating rafts. The “hydro bikes” are stable pontoon bikes that can be rented at the Wharf Boathouse, and, starting on May 18, at Ballpark Boathouse in Navy Yard (Fri-Sun through October, $26+).

 

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Picnic on a boat

970 Wharf St., SW

GoBoat’s electric cruisers have a table for guests to dine on. Photograph by Lavert Philip.

Sail across the Washington Channel—no boating license necessary—in a GoBoat you can rent at the Wharf. The electric boats travel at a speed of about three to four miles an hour, so you can do a leisurely cruise while sightseeing with friends. GoBoats carry up to eight passengers—including pets, for an additional fee. On this ride you are the captain, and are welcome to bring food and drinks (daily, $168+).

 

Explore on a paddleboard

Multiple locations in DC and Virginia

Test your balance and paddling skills on a standup paddleboard; you can find rentals throughout the area. Just south of Alexandria, paddlers can explore Dyke Marsh Wildlife Preserve, the largest freshwater tidal wetlands near DC, with paddleboards rented from Belle Haven Marina. Boating in DC also rents boards in Georgetown, the Wharf, Alexandria, and Fletcher’s Cove (daily, $16+ for Boating in DC rentals, $30+ for Belle Haven Marina).

 

Sail on a historic ship

201 N. Union St., Alexandria

Travel back in time to the 18th century aboard the Tall Ship Providence, docked in Alexandria. History guides dressed in period garb talk about the life of sailors in the Revolutionary War. The floating classroom offers dockside tours, sunset cruises, and tasting journeys on the water ($55+ for daily sunset cruises, Wed-Mon; $24 for dockside tours; $76 select dates for tasting journeys).

 

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Party with friends

Multiple locations in DC

Potomac Paddle PubPotomac Paddle Pub
Partners Jack Walten and Jack Maher aboard their Potomac Paddle Pub. Photo courtesy Potomac Paddle.

Choose a starting point—DC’s Wharf, Georgetown, or Navy Yard—and invite some friends to pedal across DC waters on a Potomac Paddle Club pontoon. There are 10 cycling stations for guests to get active while passing by sites such as the Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge and Pentagon. Boats can accommodate between 16 to 20 people, and are equipped with coolers, USB charging stations, Bluetooth speakers, and a motor if you prefer not to pedal; you can bring your own beverages aboard, too (daily, $35+).

 

Go on a Classic DC Outing

1501 Maine Ave., SW

Prepare to move your feet on the Tidal Basin’s pedal-powered, four-passenger boats. Boating in DC offers one-hour rentals for this classic DC experience (daily, $38 on weekdays, $40 on weekends and holidays).

 

Take a culinary cruise

970 Wharf St., SW

Upgrade your boating experience this summer on a yacht. Nautiste— a woman-owned yacht-charter company—launched last year. It offers three options for a luxe water journey: two motor yachts, the 72-foot Patriot and the more intimate 42-foot Independence, as well as the Cru Classé, a 47-foot French sailing yacht. The fleet ports at the Wharf. There are options to add dining experiences such as champagne and oyster tastings, or charcuterie spreads, for an additional price (private bookings, prices vary).

 

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Throw a tiki party

3100 K St., NW and 355 Water St., SE

Guests can float by DC’s monuments on a Potomac Tiki Club cruise. Photograph by Adam Olsen, courtesy of Potomac Tiki Club.

If you’re looking for a booze cruise, Potomac Tiki Club has you covered. These Potomac River explorations feature a tiki bar where guests can purchase drinks; guests can also sip beverages they packed from home. There are two boats to choose from: a smaller boat that fits up to six people and leaves from Navy Yard, and a larger boat departing from Georgetown that fits eight to 18 people (daily, $45+ for Georgetown cruises, $350+ for Navy Yard).

Visit a local bar on a boat

3100 K St., NW and 1492 4th St., SE

The local bar Whitlow’s recently launched a 48-passenger tiki boat cruise in collaboration with Sea Suite Cruises. Whitlow’s on Water— which has televisions, music, and an open-air bar mixing up summery drinks—sails the Potomac River. The boat is also available for private charters (daily, $40+, Georgetown, Navy Yard). (Here’s more.)

 

Paddle the Anacostia River

4601 Annapolis Rd., Bladensburg

Spend some time exploring a quiet stretch of the Anacostia River by yourself in a single kayak, or take a serene canoe trip. Rentals can be booked from Bladensburg Waterfront Park through October (daily, $25+ for Prince George’s and Montgomery County residents, $33+ for non-residents).

 

Enjoy sunset views

3000 K St., NW and 580 Water St., SW

Capitol River Cruises and City Cruises are great boat options for sunset tours, date-night dining, and monument sightseeing around DC. On City Cruises, you can have a three-course meal and dance to a live DJ while overlooking the Potomac; on special occasions there are firework shows, too. Capitol River Cruises ship out around 8 PM for 45-minute journeys past the Kennedy Center, the Jefferson Memorial, the Capitol, and the Lincoln Memorial (daily, $25+ for Capitol River Cruises; daily, $52+ for City Cruises).

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Voyage to Mount Vernon

145 National Plaza, National Harbor; 0 Cameron St., Alexandria

Tickets will be available soon for this experience that includes spending time at historic Mount Vernon. First, patrons cruise to George Washington’s former estate by way of a water taxi, which departs from Alexandria and National Harbor. On-board guides provide narration as guests pass sites such as Fort Washington. After the boat ride, passengers have three hours to tour Mount Vernon before the boat ride back (schedule TBA, $56+).

Briana A. Thomas is a local journalist, historian, and tour guide who specializes in the research of D.C. history and culture. She is the author of the Black history book, Black Broadway in Washington, D.C., a story that was first published in Washingtonian in 2016.



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Washington, D.C

Congressmen join city leaders to discuss next steps for direct flights from San Antonio to Washington, D.C.

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Congressmen join city leaders to discuss next steps for direct flights from San Antonio to Washington, D.C.


SAN ANTONIO – San Antonio city leaders including Mayor Ron Nirenberg will join Texas Congressmen at the San Antonio International Airport on Friday to talk about the next steps in getting direct flights to Washington D.C.

A press conference is scheduled to take place starting at 1:30 p.m.

The event will be livestreamed in this article and on KSAT’s YouTube page. Delays are possible; if there is not a livestream in this article, check back at a later time.

The focus will be on getting direct flights to Reagan International Airport. Based on the number of daily passengers currently traveling each way between the two airports, DCA is one of the largest unserved markets from the San Antonio International Airport.

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Last week, the US House House voted to pass this year’s Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act, which opens five new slots for airports across the U.S.

A press release said city leaders and others have been trying for more than a decade to secure a nonstop flight from San Antonio, which is officially recognized as Military City USA, to our nation’s capital.

U.S. Senator Ted Cruz, U.S. Representative Chip Roy and U.S. Representative Joaquin Castro will join Stephen Neuman, the vice president of global government affairs for American Airlines and Jesus Saenz, director of airports, for the city of San Antonio Aviation Department.

Copyright 2024 by KSAT – All rights reserved.



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Debate over potential bike lanes on Connecticut Avenue in DC continues

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Debate over potential bike lanes on Connecticut Avenue in DC continues


Connecticut Avenue is considered one of the busiest channels to get through D.C.

“It is dangerous, it’s fast, and it’s deadly,” said Elizabeth Kiker, the Executive Director of the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA).

The future of the thoroughfare is up for debate with the possibility of adding bike lanes back on the table.

Last year, the mayor reversed course, and the plan was postponed by the D.C. Department of Transportation.

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The move stunned WABA members.

READ MORE | DC pauses proposal to put bicycle lanes on Connecticut Ave. after major pushback

“This process happened,” Kiker said. “This process included ANCs. It included community members. It included businesses, and it was voted on and it was done, and it was budgeted, and then it was stopped. That’s not fair. That’s not how you run a city.”

However, the chance for barrier-protected bike lanes going in on Connecticut Avenue was given a new life when new language was approved by the Committee on Transportation and the Environment.

“The chairman of the transportation committee, Charles Allen, and Matt Frumin slipped in language in the budget recommendation report that requires any safety improvement on not just Connecticut Ave. but any road to have protected bike lanes or else they withhold all the funds for safety improvements,” said Lee Mayer, President of Save Connecticut Avenue.

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He said this could mean that the D.C. Council’s transportation committee could block all capital improvements to Connecticut Avenue and any street if bike lanes are not included.

7News reached out to Committee Chair Allen’s office.

They said the language has been misinterpreted.

In a statement, Allen’s office wrote:

“The language approved by the Committee on Transportation and the Environment preserves full funding for the project, including 5% to create an alternative design. It does restrict construction from advancing on Conn Ave that does not include protected bike lanes (option C from the many years of discussion includes protected bike lanes). The clause “or any other capital project for the same or similar purpose” was inserted to prevent DDOT from simply renaming or attempting to skirt the law and advance construction. This language clearly applies only to the Conn Ave Street Safety Project and does not apply to other safe streets projects around the District.”

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Still, both sides of the debate remain uncertain of the future and tell 7News they’ll work to plead their case with councilmembers ahead of the vote.

“This is going to hurt the mayor’s plan for revitalization for downtown,” said Mayer.

“It’s going to be massive congestion up and down Connecticut Ave. and people are not going to want to go there,” he added.

“We don’t know what they’re going to say, but we hope they say this is back on the way they said it would be,” said Kiker.

The DC Council will vote on the matter twice. The first vote is set for Wednesday, May 29. The second vote will happen on July 12.

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Between those votes, the public can ask questions during a virtual meeting on June 3.



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Larsen Applauds $24.2 Million for Northwest Washington Fish Passage Projects

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Larsen Applauds $24.2 Million for Northwest Washington Fish Passage Projects


WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, Rep. Rick Larsen (WA-02), the lead Democrat on the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee, announced a total of $24.2 million in recommended funding for three Tribal projects to remove and replace fish barrier culverts and restore access to healthy habitat for migratory fish, including endangered salmon populations, in Northwest Washington.

“Thanks to the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and Inflation Reduction Act, the Tulalip, Swinomish and Sauk-Suiattle Tribes and their partners have the critical funding they need to improve fish passage and foster salmon recovery in Northwest Washington,” said Larsen. “I will continue to champion robust federal funding to improve salmon habitat connectivity and boost resiliency to ensure Washington meets its treaty obligations to Indian Tribes.”

The awards are recommended under the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Restoring Fish Passage through Barrier Removal Grant and Restoring Tribal Priority Fish Passage through Barrier Removal Grant initiatives, which are funded through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and the Inflation Reduction Act.

Three WA-02 Fish Passage Projects Recommended for Funding

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NOAA recommended a total of $24.2 million in grant funding for three projects in Washington’s Second District:

One grant under the Restoring Fish Passage through Barrier Removal Grant initiative:

  • $11.7 million for the Tulalip Fish Passage Collaborative I
    • The Tulalip Tribes will work with partners to plan and construct multiple barrier removals in several watersheds in the Stillaguamish and Snohomish Basins, part of the South Whidbey Basin in Puget Sound.
    • This work will support several salmon and steelhead species that are of economic, recreational, and cultural importance to the Tulalip Tribes and other members of the local community.
    • By removing or replacing undersized and aging culverts with structures designed to withstand climate change, these efforts will also help protect the community from flooding.

Two grants under the Restoring Tribal Priority Fish Passage through Barrier Removal Grant initiative:

  • $9.2 million for Tulalip Fish Passage Collaborative II
    • The Tulalip Tribes will work with partners to remove multiple fish passage barriers at priority streams in the Stillaguamish and Snohomish Basins, part of the South Whidbey Basin in Puget Sound.
    • This effort will open significant habitat to access by threatened Puget Sound Chinook and steelhead, as well as Puget Sound coho. It will also benefit Southern Resident killer whales, a NOAA Species in the Spotlight, by supporting their prey.
    • Climate change considerations will be incorporated into the barrier replacements, to help prevent flooding and increase community resilience.
  • $3.3 million for Skagit Basin Tribal Priority Fish Passage Implementation
    • The Skagit River System Cooperative, which provides natural resource management services for the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community and the Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe, will remove or replace seven culverts that block fish passage in the Skagit and Samish watersheds. They will also assess the feasibility of one additional fish passage project.
    • This project will support tribal capacity to develop and engage in fish passage projects and provide a hands-on opportunity for tribal members and youth to participate in habitat restoration.

Additional Information

NOAA is recommending nearly $240 million in funding for 46 fish passage projects this year, as well as an additional $38 million in funding in future years. Total demand from all four of the NOAA Fisheries Office of Habitat Conservation Round 2 competitions is $3.5 billion, more than 6 times the amount of funding available.

For more information on NOAA’s announcement and fish passage initiatives, click here.

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