Connect with us

Virginia

Virginia tech company admonished for

Published

on

Virginia tech company admonished for


New report on Black job applicants

Advertisement


Some companies discriminate against Black job applicants more than others, report finds

05:22

Advertisement

A Virginia company’s job listing inviting only White people and the U.S.-born to apply for a position didn’t just raise eyebrows online — it also caught the attention of the U.S. government.

Arthur Grand Technologies’ job advertisement last year restricted eligible candidates to “only US Born Citizens [white]” and those living within 60 miles of Dallas, Texas, noted the U.S. Department of Justice, which determined that the Ashburn, Va.-based company’s discriminatory listing violated the Immigration and Nationality Act.

A recruiter working for an Arthur Grand subsidiary in India posted the ad on job site Indeed in March and April of 2023 for a business analyst position with the company’s sales and insurance claims team. The ad was widely circulated on social media and generated multiple news stories.

“It is shameful that in the 21st century, we continue to see employers using ‘whites only’ and ‘only US born’ job postings to lock out otherwise eligible job candidates of color,” Kristen Clarke, assistant attorney general with the department’s civil rights division, said in a statement. “I share the public’s outrage at Arthur Grand’s appalling and discriminatory ban on job candidates based on citizenship status, national origin, color and race.”

Arthur Grand did not immediately respond to requests for comment. 

Advertisement

The company earlier denied approving the ad and said it had been placed by a disgruntled worker looking to embarrass the company, according to a settlement with the Justice Department. 

The company will pay a civil penalty of $7,500 under the agreement to resolve the matter. It also agreed to pay $31,000 to compensate those who filed complaints with the Department of Labor.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Virginia

Rep. Kiggans, Virginia Beach leaders want Navy to send F-35's to NAS Oceana

Published

on

Rep. Kiggans, Virginia Beach leaders want Navy to send F-35's to NAS Oceana


VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WAVY) — Virginia Beach City Council could soon back a push to bring new jets to Naval Air Station Oceana.

Mayor Bobby Dyer and Vice Mayor Rosemary Wilson are putting forward a resolution that will formalize the city’s support and openness for having the U.S. Navy locate new F-35C Lightning II joint strike-fighter aircraft to the East Coast Master Jet Base.

Currently, the jets, described as “the most lethal, survivable and connected fighter aircraft in the world,” are all headed mostly to the West Coast

Rep. Jen Kiggans, (R-Virginia Beach), herself a former Naval aviator, said it’s time to start taking a look at East Coast locations as well.

Advertisement

The thought is, if Navy leadership sees the city support, they may not only consider basing the F-35’s here, but they will likely also spend the money to make improvements the base desperately needs.

“I believe that it is time to look to the future of NAS Oceana’s strategic mission and start the conversation about bringing the military’s newest aircraft to Hampton Roads,” Kiggans said in a statement. “Starting the process early allows for the numerous studies and regulatory tasks to be completed by the time additional F-35 are assigned to a home base.”

NAS Oceana, which spans more than 5,000 acres in the heart of Virginia’s largest city, is home to 330 aircraft, including the F/A-18F Super Hornet, and provides an estimated $1.5 billion in economic impact annually, per the Navy.

First opened in 1943, prior commanding officers have said the funding from the federal government isn’t nearly enough to keep up with the base’s aging infrastructure. As of 2021, roughly 60% of the base’s barracks were uninhabitable because of a variety of problems, including mold.

The Navy struck a deal with Virginia Beach that same year to try and come up with solutions to reduce the base’s overall cost. Those potential solutions included possible partnerships with private operators to take over management and upkeep of some of the facilities, as well as land leases.

Advertisement

However, so far, Wilson said that has proven to be more difficult than initially expected.

It’s one of the reasons Kiggans is now pursuing this path.

“We all know that with new platforms and technology comes a new mission and additional resources to support that mission,” Kiggans said. “This is a critical part of my advocacy, as I would like to see NAS Oceana receive long overdue funding support to upgrade and revitalize the base.’

Wilson represents District 5 on Virginia Beach City Council, which includes the entirety of Oceana. She remembers well when the base’s future was up in the air back in 2005.

At that time, the base realignment and closure commission was concerned enough to nearly close Oceana due to encroachment of development and the complaints from community members about jet noise.

Advertisement

She wants to prevent that from ever happening again.

“I talked to our congresswoman about it, and she thought it would be very helpful to her job in Washington,” Wilson said regarding the resolution. “We want to make sure that they know that they’re welcome and we have a large military community. … We want to make sure that everyone in Washington, the decision makers, know that we love our jets and our Navy and whatever they have coming forward, we would love to have them right here.”

The vote on the resolution is tentatively scheduled for July 2.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Virginia

Shannon Taylor, top Henrico prosecutor, launches Dem. bid for Virginia AG

Published

on

Shannon Taylor, top Henrico prosecutor, launches Dem. bid for Virginia AG


Henrico County Commonwealth’s Attorney Shannon Taylor announced Wednesday she will seek the Democratic nomination for Virginia attorney general, emphasizing her track record as a prosecutor in what is likely to be a competitive primary contest for the job now held by Republican Jason S. Miyares.

Taylor, who was reelected last year to a fourth term as her Richmond suburb’s top prosecutor, pointed to nearly three decades of experience in the courtroom — and her consistent electoral wins in a former GOP stronghold — as evidence she was ready for the statewide post.

“When it comes to protecting women’s rights and our children or standing up against hate, those aren’t just my positions,” she said. “I’ve actually taken on either cases or actions to demonstrate my commitment to those Democratic values.”

Taylor is the first candidate from either party to formally announce a bid for attorney general, one of three statewide offices in Virginia that will be on the ballot next year.

Advertisement

Former state delegate Jay Jones, a Norfolk trial attorney who lost the Democrats’ 2021 primary for attorney general, is widely expected to run for the position again in 2025 — with the backing of former governors Ralph Northam and Terry McAuliffe.

On the Republican side, Miyares has not yet announced whether he will run for reelection as attorney general or if he plans to seek the Republican nomination for governor, as some expect. (Gov. Glenn Youngkin (R) is term-limited from running again for the job.)

Taylor, 56, is a lifelong Virginia resident who served as a prosecutor in Richmond, oversaw a regional grand jury and worked as criminal defense lawyer before running for her current post, becoming the first Democrat in years to win countywide in Henrico — a once-conservative area closely associated with former House Republican leader Eric Cantor.

She said that as commonwealth’s attorney, she hired more women and people of color to serve as prosecutors and ran her office through the lens of “compassionate accountability,” putting a greater focus on mental health and substance use issues.

“I do call myself a ‘progressive prosecutor,’” she said. “‘Progressive’ is to do things differently. That is exactly what I brought to that office and what I would continue to do if given the opportunity to move forward in a new role.”

Advertisement

But she said she did not hesitate to fight acts of hate, prosecuting a self-identified Ku Klux Klan leader who drove a truck through a crowd of Black Lives Matter protesters and then pushing state lawmakers to strengthen related hate crime legislation.

She has also been involved in a string of high-profile cases, recently serving as special prosecutor in Virginia’s case against one man who was accused of using a flaming torch during the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville to intimidate counterprotesters. The jury failed to reach a verdict in the case — the first test of a new state law meant to ban Ku Klux Klan cross-burnings — though it is expected to return to court this summer for additional proceedings.

Taylor has also previously said she is conducting a probe related to the 2023 death of Irvo Otieno, a Black man in mental distress who was asphyxiated in a Richmond-area hospital while being restrained by three workers and seven sheriff’s deputies.

The case is being prosecuted in nearby Dinwiddie County, where that incident occurred, but Otieno was brought to that facility from a Henrico hospital and then the county jail. The sheriff’s deputies who restrained him for 11 minutes, according to surveillance video, are all from Henrico.

Taylor also pointed to her experience in several statewide efforts, including as past president of the Virginia Association of Commonwealth’s Attorneys and on a working group that reviews legislation for the Virginia State Senate’s Courts of Justice Committee.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Virginia

Eugene Vindman, whose Jewish immigrant story featured in Trump's first impeachment trial, wins primary in Virginia – Jewish Telegraphic Agency

Published

on

Eugene Vindman, whose Jewish immigrant story featured in Trump's first impeachment trial, wins primary in Virginia – Jewish Telegraphic Agency


WASHINGTON — A former White House official whose Jewish Ukrainian origins played a prominent role in Donald Trump’s first impeachment hearings won a Democratic congressional primary in Virginia on Tuesday.

Elsewhere in the state, two prominent Jewish Democrats failed to secure a win in a primary in the increasingly Democratic Washington D.C. suburbs and exurbs. And efforts by Donald Trump and Jewish Republicans, among others, to oust a hardline conservative incumbent in central Virginia resulted in a Republican primary race too close to call.

Eugene Vindman won the Democratic nomination in the state’s 7th District, which stretches south from Washington’s Virginia exurbs to the state’s center. Vindman came to prominence in 2020 when Trump forced him and his twin brother Alexander out of their jobs as National Security Council staffers.

Advertisement

Both men were officers, and on loan to the White House from the military. Trump had them in his sights after Alexander Vindman in 2019 testified to Congress about the contents of a phone call from Trump to Ukrainian President Volodomyr Zelensky in which Trump sought to leverage aid to Ukraine in exchange for dirt on Joe Biden, who was gearing up to face Trump in the 2020 election.

The phone call led to Trump’s first impeachment; he was acquitted in the Senate. The Vindman twins had arrived as children from Ukraine when it was part of the Soviet Union. Vindman’s role in the impeachment drama helped elevate his candidacy to being by far the best funded.

Vindman hopes to replace Rep. Abigail Spanberger, who is running for governor. The 7th district is a swing district and he now faces Derrick Anderson, a former Green Beret who had the backing of the Republican party establishment.

In the race in central Virginia, meanwhile, challenger John McGuire was a few hundred votes ahead of Rep. Bob Good. Race watchers said it would likely be Friday before a winner would be announced in the district. 

Whether or not Good survives the vote, McGuire’s strong showing was the result of an alliance of strange bedfellows: Trump, the former president who would not forgive Good for initially backing Florida Gov. DeSantis in the primaries; former House Speaker Kevin McCarthy, who blamed Good, the chairman of the hard-right Freedom Caucus, for ousting him from the speakership last year; and the Republican Jewish Coalition, shocked into action by the growing number of Republicans buying into Good’s resistance to supplemental aid for Israel.

Advertisement

National media cast that expensive race as a referendum on whether incumbent Republicans couldn’t survive without paying absolute fealty to Trump, who is running again this year.

Pro-Israel groups see Good’s argument on Israel aid — demanding offsets in exchange for the funding — as a slippery slope to eroding assistance for Israel and turning it into a political football. Good is notably the only incumbent RJC is targeting this year. McGuire, who like Good embraces Trump’s denial of Joe Biden’s 2020 election victory, is equally as conservative, but is committed to funding Israel’s defense.

In the 10th District, encompassing areas of northern Virginia which have in recent years attracted Jews to its government contract work and its tech sector, a crowded race to replace retiring Democratic incumbent Rep. Jennifer Wexton included Eileen Filler-Corn, who made history as the first woman and the first Jewish speaker of the state’s House of Delegates, and State Del. Dan Helmer.

Both were defeated by State Sen. Suhas Subramanyam, who had the backing of Wexton, who is retiring because of illness. When Wexton won the district in 2018 it was seen as a swing district, but it is now ranked as safe for Democrats.

Filler-Corn, who came in fourth, ended her term as leader of the Democratic caucus in 2022 on bad terms with other delegates, which cut into what she had hoped would be an easy run. Helmer, who came in second, was plagued in the final days of the campaign with an allegation — which he denied — that he had sexually harassed a campaign volunteer when he ran for the same seat in 2018.

Advertisement

Pro-Israel money poured into the race in part because of Filler-Corn’s longstanding bona fides with the pro-Israel community, but also because there were other candidates who called for restrictions on defense funding for Israel. Subramanyam has forcefully defended Israel in its war against Hamas. In an online forum last month convened by the Jewish Democratic Council of America, he said Hamas should not survive the war it launched against Israel on Oct. 7. 

“I want to see an end to this war, and I’d like to see a situation that involves the enduring defeat of Hamas,” said Subramanyam, who has visited Israel. He said he supported “a two state solution long term, but Hamas can’t be one of the states.”

Such declarations meant his win drew a sigh of relief from some of Filler-Corn’s backers, despite her defeat. 

“By nominating a proud pro-Israel candidate, Democrats in Virginia’s 10th District have proven once again that being pro-Israel is not just wise policy, but also winning politics,” said a statement from the Democratic Majority for Israel, whose political action committee had backed Filler-Corn.

Advertisement





Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending