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Texas spring practice position previews

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Texas spring practice position previews


Winter conditioning is wrapped up for the Texas Longhorns and that means that with spring break over, the first of 15 spring practices leading up to the annual Orange-White game in April is on Tuesday.

With the Longhorns preparing to enter the SEC this summer, it’s time to assess the state of the program by looking at each position group entering the spring, as well as a high-level look at five storylines to follow over the next month.



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Texas Hail(ed) 2023 a Record-Breaking Year for Insured Losses

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Texas Hail(ed) 2023 a Record-Breaking Year for Insured Losses


How severe storms in Texas and population growth are driving hail damage

Severe convective storms — also known as severe thunderstorms — caused tens of billions of dollars of insured losses across the U.S. in 2023.

Tornadoes, straight-line winds (including derechos) and hail are the damage-causing agents of severe thunderstorms, but it was the latter that dominated the loss landscape in 2023.

Hail of at least one inch in diameter battered more than 10 million homes across the U.S. Two million of those homes were in Texas alone.

Historically, risk managers have considered severe thunderstorms a secondary peril given the high-frequency but low-severity nature of these events. However, hail is quickly becoming an expensive peril that should be modeled with the same scrutiny as the “big ones” like hurricanes and earthquakes.

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In 2023 there were 141 days with large hail (greater than two inches), which is more days than any year since 2003. Insured loss figures have also been increasing. This significant increase is the result of two interrelated factors: climate patterns and the increasing scale of homes.

Understand 2024 Severe Convective Storm Season Risk

2024 SCS Risk Report

Does Changing Weather Lead to Texas-Sized Hail?

There is a direct link between a warming atmosphere and weather pattern volatility. Annual or multiannual climate phenomena, such as the shift to El Niño during the spring of 2023 following multiple years of La Niña, likely influenced last year’s severe convective storm activity. This influence was compounded by record-breaking sea-surface temperatures and the subtropical jet stream, a belt of winds located within the tropics.

While the evidence to connect weather patterns and the number of intense storms is compelling, it is difficult to determine if long-term atmospheric changes are the primary driver of increased severe thunderstorm activity without a more extensive historical record.

Nevertheless, it is important to recognize that evolving climate risk is changing historical patterns, and as a result, has the potential to influence the impacts that severe convective storms can have on properties in future climate scenarios. 

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Affordability Means Texas Weather and Hailstorms

In conjunction with the volatile climate, more people are moving to hail-prone areas like Texas due to the allure of more affordable homes.

“Given how expansive Texas is, it is way more likely hail falls on the ground avoiding homes, office buildings or farms,” said CoreLogic’s Director of Catastrophe Response Jon Schneyer. “But in 2023, many of the largest hailstorms happened to hit major cities in Texas like the Dallas-Fort Worth and Austin areas. When that happens, losses can add up quickly.”

Texas has been attracting newcomers due to its low cost of living, strong economy, and job opportunities. Historically, substantial portions of Texas were sparsely populated, especially in the rural areas where hail is more frequent and severe. However, in recent years, the urban and suburban areas of Texas have been expanding rapidly, creating more demand for housing and infrastructure.

According to a CoreLogic economic analysis, Texas has been home to some of the fastest-growing cities over the past five years. In 2019, and again in 2020, more people moved to Austin than left the metro area. While this trend flipped from 2021 to 2023, there was a strong inter-metro migration pattern from Austin to San Antonio, which saw the fourth-largest influx of residents in 2023. Similarly, Houston grew rapidly and had the third-highest rate of in-migration in the U.S.

Everything Is Bigger in Texas — Including Costs

Despite the increasing number of migrants to this low-cost state, both construction and labor costs are going up. This means that even in Texas, houses are getting pricier. They are also bigger.

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Across the U.S., the size of single-family homes has increased in the decades following 1980. In 1985, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development data showed that the median square footage for single-family homes was 1,610. By 2022, the median size of a new, single-family home was 2,383 square feet, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This means that more roof area, windows, and siding are exposed to hail impacts. And the materials for these repairs are increasing in price.

“Areas where people are building bigger, more expensive homes were hit hard,” Schneyer said. “On top of that, inflationary pressures on materials and labor are really driving up individual claims. What might’ve been a $2,000 to $4,000 roof repair 10 years ago could be twice that or more now. So that will really inflate insured losses.”

Inflation has also played a role in driving up the costs of reconstruction, although it has stabilized in recent months. However, asphalt shingles, one of the most common roof-type materials used throughout the U.S., experienced a 40% cost increase over the past five years. Similarly, the cost of ceramic tiles increased by 26% since 2018.

Compounding the increasing square footage that is exposed to Texas weather hailstorms is the challenge associated with finding skilled labor to make the necessary repairs. Since the Great Recession of 2006 – 2010, there has been a persistent reduction in employees entering the construction trades. The result is that the pace of labor attempts to match demand but is perpetually racing to catch up, allowing for premium prices to dominate the market.

Texas Hail Is a Year-Round Peril

Further straining the equation for insurers is the fact that hail is a year-round risk. In May, Texas faced a slew of storms in the lead up to June when CoreLogic estimated that in one week alone, straight-line winds and hail generated between $7 billion and $10 billion in insured losses. Then in September, a hailstorm hit the greater Austin metro with hail stones the size of softballs barreling down on the highly populated area. October then brought large hail to the Lubbock area.

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The unprecedented scale of insured losses has insurers and homeowners across the U.S. reconsidering the risk associated with these seasonal storms.

One opportunity to help reduce the vulnerability of its homes to hail damage and lower the costs of reconstruction associated with severe convective storms is the implementation of building codes.

By implementing and enforcing stricter building codes, insurers writing in Texas can gain assurance that mitigating measures — such as using impact-resistant roofing materials, reinforced windows, and durable siding — are routinely recognized.

Research, property data, stringent building codes, and a commitment to preparedness are all lessons that insurers and homeowners can glean from 2023 to get ready to mitigate property risk for the 2024 season.

Understand 2024 Severe Convective Storm Season Risk

2024 SCS Risk Report

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The CoreLogic statements and information in this blog post may not be reproduced or used in any form without express written permission. While all the CoreLogic statements and information are believed to be accurate, CoreLogic makes no representation or warranty as to the completeness or accuracy of the statements and information and assumes no responsibility whatsoever for the information and statements or any reliance thereon. CoreLogic® and Marshall & Swift® are the registered trademarks of CoreLogic, Inc. and/or its subsidiaries.



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Tiny Texas City Repels Russia-Tied Hackers Eyeing Water System

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Tiny Texas City Repels Russia-Tied Hackers Eyeing Water System


When Mike Cypert got the call that utilities in remote Texas communities were being hacked, he raced across his office to unplug the computer that ran his city’s water system.

Hale Center is a dusty, cotton-growing burg of 2,000 about five hours drive northwest of Dallas. After the alert from a software vendor in January, Cypert, the city manager, said he found thousands of attempts to breach Hale Center’s firewall, some coming from an internet address that traced back to St. Petersburg, Russia.

Within minutes of the discovery, Cypert said he reported the episode to agents from the FBI and US Department of Homeland Security, who were already looking into related incidents in nearby Texas towns. One of the hacks caused a water tank in another city to overflow.

The attacks in Texas are the latest example of hackers — some of them tied to US adversaries — targeting America’s sprawling network of water utilities. In November, an Iranian-backed group attacked Israeli-made digital controls commonly used in the water and wastewater industries in the US, affecting organizations across several states. That same month, the North Texas Municipal Water District, which supplies water to more than 2 million customers, was the victim of a ransomware attacks.

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Chinese state-sponsored hackers also attacked a water utility in Hawaii, the Washington Post reported in December.

“The water sector is poorly resourced and is under siege from three fronts. This is now Iran, China and Russia,” said John Hultquist, chief analyst at Mandiant Intelligence.

A spokesperson for the FBI declined to comment. The Department of Homeland Security didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

Read More: Iranian-Linked Hacks Expose Failure to Safeguard US Water System

Researchers at Mandiant, a unit of Google Cloud, found potential connections between the attacks on water utilities in Texas and one of Russia’s most notorious hacking groups, known as Sandworm. The group has been accused of repeatedly turning out the lights in Ukraine and hacking the 2018 Olympics Opening Games in South Korea. The US government says it is part of Russia’s military spy agency, but the ties between Sandworm and the Texas attacks are less than certain. “We’ve never seen them cross the line in the US like this before,” Hultquist said.

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Among the other victims of the recent hacks was the city of Muleshoe, a 5,000-person community in northwest Texas. A resident called the city on January 18 to report a water tank overflowing. City staff found that they’d largely lost control of the system, took it offline and called the company that provides Muleshoe’s industrial control software, City Manager Ramon Sanchez said at a public meeting the next month that was covered by the Plainview Herald. The vendor told city officials that other area communities were seeing similar problems, Sanchez said at the meeting.

Sanchez didn’t respond to messages seeking comment.

That same day, a social media account called “CyberArmyofRussia_Reborn” posted a video that appears to show hackers manipulating Muleshoe’s industrial control system. Mandiant and other cybersecurity researchers believe Sandworm created and control CyberArmyofRussia_Reborn, which Hultquist described as a hacktivist persona. It’s possible that other cyber attackers are using its platforms, he said.

Andy Bennett, the chief technology officer of cybersecurity firm Apollo Information Systems, said there are various reasons why hackers might target small-town water systems. They could provide a “testing ground” for hacking tools intended for bigger targets, he said, or give foreign countries a way to scare Americans.

“Small-town America feels safe,” said Bennett, a former cybersecurity official for the state of Texas,”and if the water supply is in jeopardy, it undoes that.”

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US intelligence officials are still debating whether Sandworm was involved in the Texas water utility breaches, according to people familiar with the situation who didn’t want to be named due to the sensitivities.

The Russian Embassy in Washington declined to comment.

US officials are especially worried about attacks by nation-state hackers on critical sectors of the US economy, like defense, dams, energy, financial services and water systems. Last year, the Environmental Protection Agency dropped plans to require states to assess water facilities’ cyber defenses. Republican lawmakers in three states called the oversight illegal, accusing the EPA of overreach. The White House said it would work with Congress to beef up the environmental watchdog’s authority.

The attacks on Texas utilities targeted at least two other communities. In Abernathy, hackers entered through a virtual network connection, but city staff caught them within 30 seconds and cut off the attackers as they were trying to change passwords, City Manager Donald Provost told Bloomberg News. Lockney’s city manager, Buster Poling, Jr., said his staff also caught the attack early and that it “really did not affect the city.”

Hale Center’s Cypert said he learned that other towns had been attacked when the city’s industrial control software vendor called telling them to “lock down.” Hale Center uses the same vendor as Muleshoe and a handful of other area communities, he said.

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When the warning came in, Cypert said he rushed to unplug the ethernet cable from the computer that operates the water system. Hale Center wasn’t breached, but Cypert said in reviewing its security, the city’s IT contractor found what appeared to be a brute force attempt to crack Hale Center’s firewall — 37,000 tries in four days.

The attempts on Hale Center’s firewall came from IP addresses around the world but one was repeated over and over, Cypert said. The investigation traced it back to St. Petersburg and the city’s industrial control vendor, Morgeson Consulting in Lubbock, quickly got Cypert on a conference call with FBI agents already investigating the Muleshoe attack, he said.

Morgeson Consulting’s owner didn’t immediately respond to an email seeking comment.

Cypert said he later sent the FBI data from the attempts on its firewall. The city’s IT contractor, Ben Warren, also walked the investigators through some of the technical details, he said. The agents were impressed by Warren’s technical acumen and offered the city manager a piece of advice, Cypert recalled.

“Hang on to him,” they said, referring to Warren.

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Copyright 2024 Bloomberg.

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Texas
Russia



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The Dallas Morning News named newsroom of the year in Texas journalism awards

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The Dallas Morning News named newsroom of the year in Texas journalism awards


The Dallas Morning News received nine first-place awards in the 2023 Texas Managing Editors journalism awards, including being named newsroom of the year.

In total, 18 awards and two honorable mentions went to The News.

The results, recognizing the work of news outlets across the state, were announced over the weekend at the Texas Managing Editors’ annual conference in Temple.

The News competes in the 3A class, which includes the state’s largest newsrooms.

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“Every single reporter, photojournalist, designer, digital, multi-platform and front-line editor, researcher and columnist in our newsroom works incredibly hard and believes wholeheartedly that the journalism we pour ourselves into is vital to our community and its future,” The News’ executive editor Katrice Hardy said. “From our coverage of education and health care, from our coverage of the arts and transportation, from our coverage of our public safety institutions to our state and local governments, we aspire daily to publish journalism that informs our readers about people, programs and policies that impact their lives.

“This honor is truly amazing because it underscores that our work has an impact on our community and across North Texas.”

First-place awards

The News’ staff won Newspaper of the Year in the 3A class, the contest’s highest honor. The last time The News won this award was in 2020.

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Rangers beat writer Evan Grant won first place in the Celeste Williams Star sports reporter of the year category. His body of work included covering the Texas Rangers’ becoming World Series champions for the first time; the Rangers acquiring Max Scherzer from the New York Mets; a profile on MLB player brothers Nathaniel and Josh Lowe and their mother’s brain cancer diagnosis; how ex-Rangers general manager Jon Daniels was faring a year after firing; and Bally Sports’ financial woes.

Alex Lee, of Carrollton, takes a photo at ground level in a field of bluebonnets at Bluebonnet Park on April 10, 2023, in Ennis. This photo was part of the winning portfolio from Smiley Pool.(Smiley N. Pool / Staff Photographer)

Smiley Pool won first place for Star photojournalist of the year with photography covering an array of subjects including the Cowboys, Rangers, an in-demand Nick and Sam’s server, the aftermath of the mass shooting at the Allen outlets, bluebonnets and more. Pool finished in a tie for first place with Austin American-Statesman photographer Ricardo B. Brazziell.

Watchdog columnist Dave Lieber won first place for general column writing, recognizing his work covering a senior caught in the middle as TxDOT faced criticism for lack of empathy; a mayor’s actions that led to a council member’s arrest in Godley; and a Watchdog report on syndicates spending millions of dollars on Texas’ lottery to beat out everyone else.

Architecture critic Mark Lamster won first place for comment and criticism, which included stories about Fountain Place, the rocket-shaped tower that stands out in Dallas’ skyline and a Carrollton church that he deemed “the best new building in Texas.”

Cowboys beat writer Michael Gehlken won first place sports feature for his profile on “the untold legend” of Dallas Cowboys left tackle Tyron Smith’s hands.

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Photographer Tom Fox won the first place in photojournalism for his work on The News’ Deadly Fake project uncovering fentanyl’s many effects on North Texas.

Texas Rangers fan from 1972, Terry Cox, (center) from Tyler, TX, including other, cheer...
Texas Rangers fan from 1972, Terry Cox, (center) from Tyler, TX, including other, cheer following Texas Rangers’ winning the World Series in five games against the Arizona Diamondbacks, during a watch party at Globe Life Field on, Nov. 1, 2023, in Arlington. Shafkat Anowar won first place in feature photography for this image.(Shafkat Anowar / Staff Photographer)

Photographer Shafkat Anowar won first place in feature photography for the photo of a Texas Rangers fan’s response to the team’s World Series win at a watch party of Globe Life Field.

Multiplatform editor Sandra Guerra-Cline won first place in headline writing. Her best headlines included: The stars at night are not so bright — Results of study on artificial lighting’s effect stun scientists; History’s resting place — Oakland Cemetery, home to Rusty the dog, lives on despite the odds; Home, home on the stageAcademy of Country Music settles in, might stay awhile; With only words as weapons — At hearing, victims’ loved ones confront Walmart gunman who killed 23 and A cheap car is a nonstarter — There’s only one left under $30,000 for shoppers in the U.S.

Second-place awards

The News staff won a second-place award for Star breaking news report of the year, recognizing its quick and extensive coverage of the mass shooting at the Allen Premium Outlets. The team produced more than 17 stories in the first 24 hours after the tragedy, accounting for stories from its bureaus in Austin and Washington, D.C. and articles translated into Spanish.

The News’ editorial board won second place for editorial writing for a series of political pieces, including one after Attorney General Ken Paxton was acquitted in his impeachment trial and another named the eight Paxton whistleblowers as The Dallas Morning News’ Texans of the Year.

Breaking news reporter Jamie Landers won second place for Star reporter of the year. Her body of work included a narrative on how the Dallas Zoo mystery unraveled, a eulogy for a vulture at the zoo, the reopening of a restaurant at the Allen outlets following a mass shooting and contributions to the newsroom’s Deadly Fake project about how Narcan vending machines could help combat the drug crisis and police investigating fentanyl-related deaths as homicides.

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Sports columnist Kevin Sherrington won second place for sports column writing, which recognized his work covering Texas Rangers’ Adolis García seizing the moment for the team in the World Series, a story of bitter beginnings and the birth of the Rangers-Astros rivalry, Colorado’s Deion Sanders’ reaction to his team’s win over TCU.

Assistant news editor Alma Lozoya also won second place for designer of the year for a series of front-page designs.

Third-place awards

The News’ staff won third place for Star online package of the year with its Deadly Fake project that published at least one story on each day in September.

Lauren Caruba, Smiley Pool and Ari Sen, won a third-place award in Star investigative report of the year for the series Bleeding Out. The project, which The News completed in partnership with the San Antonio Express-News, was an investigation into why tens of thousands of injured Americans die from preventable bleeding each year.

Pool was also awarded third place for sports photography. Multiplatform editor Erik Schutz won third place for headline writing.

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Honorable mention

The News received a staff-wide honorable mention for team effort for its coverage of the mass shooting at the Allen Premium Outlets.

Education Lab reporter Talia Richman was recognized for honorable mention in specialty reporting. Her stories included the story of a Texas student scared of school shootings being punished, a look at Texas’ explosion of uncertified new teachers filling shortages and how Texas plans to make access to advanced math more equitable.



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