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Oregon vs South Carolina picks, predictions, odds: Who wins March Madness game?

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Oregon vs South Carolina picks, predictions, odds: Who wins March Madness game?


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No. 11 seed Oregon and No. 6 seed South Carolina play Thursday, March 21 in an NCAA Tournament first-round game in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Midwest Region game is scheduled for 1 p.m. PT and can be seen on TNT (stream with Sling TV).

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Who will win the March Madness game and advance to the second round?

Check out these NCAA Tournament first-round picks and predictions for the men’s college basketball matchup.

South Carolina is a 1.5-point favorite in the game in March Madness odds provided by BetMGM Sportsbook.

The Gamecocks are -110 on the moneyline. The Ducks are also -110.

The over/under for the game is set at 132.5 points.

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Scott Keepfer writes: “The Gamecocks have been a tough out this season and the belief here is that they’ll be the same on Thursday.”

March Madness TV schedule: Television channels, streaming, how to watch NCAA Tournament

DraftKings: Bet Oregon to beat South Carolina in NCAA Tournament

Grace McDermott writes: “With Dante healthy and back in his rhythm, the Pac-12 champs are primed for a classic March upset here. The Ducks heated up in the conference tournament while South Carolina saw an early exit in a bad loss. The two teams are fairly evenly matched at KenPom, so take the one with more momentum.”

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It writes: “South Carolina has covered 23 times in 33 chances against the spread this season. Oregon has compiled a 16-18-0 record against the spread this year. The 72.0 points per game the Gamecocks put up are just 0.1 more points than the Ducks allow (71.9).”

March Madness game odds: Point spreads, moneylines, over/unders for NCAA Tournament 2024

Action Network: Take Oregon with the points against South Carolina

Sean Paul writes: “Getting the ball inside to N’Faly Dante has proven to be a successful strategy. He went off for 25 points on 12-for-12 shooting against Colorado. South Carolina could struggle to stop the 6-foot-11, 230-pound phenom. The opening line is closer than you’d expect from a 6 vs. 11 matchup with South Carolina favored by just 1.5 points. I’m backing the Ducks here – it feels like an outstanding spot for a surging team.”

ESPN: South Carolina has a 54.6% chance to beat Oregon in March Madness

The site gives the Ducks a 45.4% shot at defeating the Gamecocks in Thursday’s first-round March Madness NCAA Tournament game.

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March Madness NCAA Tournament odds: Who is favored to win 2024 national championship?

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STREAM THE GAME: Watch Oregon vs. South Carolina live with Sling TV

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Reach Jeremy Cluff at jeremy.cluff@arizonarepublic.com. Follow him on X, formerly Twitter @Jeremy_Cluff.

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South-Carolina

South Carolina football spring transfer portal tracker: Updates on Shane Beamer’s roster

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South Carolina football spring transfer portal tracker: Updates on Shane Beamer’s roster


COLUMBIA — The spring transfer portal for college football officially opened on April 16 and will close again on April 30.

South Carolina football coach Shane Beamer said he will focus on the offensive line and wide receiver depth but will use this window as a time to strengthen the roster in any way he can.

The Gamecocks finished 5-7 in 2023, fourth in the SEC.

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Here is what to know about the comings and goings via the spring transfer portal window:

Who is leaving South Carolina football via the transfer portal

Jaxon Hughes: The first to announce they would enter the spring portal was offensive lineman Jaxon Hughes; however, Hughes was not on scholarship. Hughes battled injuries during his time with the Gamecocks and was a walk-on after spending four years at Charlotte.

Destination: TBD

Joseph Morris: Walk-on wide receiver Joseph Morris entered the transfer portal on April 22, GamecocksCentral reported. He played in one game in 2023 and did not record any statistics.

Destination: TBD

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Sidney Fugar: Fugar, a redshirt junior, entered the transfer portal on April 24. The offensive lineman spent two seasons with the Gamecocks after transferring from Western Illinois. Fugar played in 20 games for the Gamecocks, starting in four of them.

Destination: TBD

SPRING GAME: What we learned about South Carolina football QB battle, and how LaNorris Sellers stood out

Who is joining the Gamecocks via the transfer portal

This story will be updated.

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Lulu Kesin covers South Carolina athletics for The Greenville News and the USA TODAY Network. Email her at lkesin@gannett.com and follow her on X, formerly known as Twitter, @Lulukesin.





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A Little North Carolina Town’s Big Green Heart

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A Little North Carolina Town’s Big Green Heart


The first time I saw Valle Crucis, in 2015, I was speechless, which had nothing to do with not knowing how to pronounce the name. My wife and I were riding with a friend down the twisting ribbon of Highway 194 out of Banner Elk, North Carolina, when a sweep of green opened below us. “This,” our friend told us, “is the loveliest part of the High Country.”

I read the sign as we passed.

Vail Crucis?”

“You say it ‘valley.’ No idea why they spell it like that.”

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I would later learn that it was Latin for “Vale of the Cross,” named, according to legend, nearly two hundred years ago by the North Carolina bishop Levi Silliman Ives for the three streams that converged and brought to mind a Saint Andrew’s cross. My friend didn’t know that at the time, but he was right about Valle Crucis being the loveliest part of the High Country, and by the time 194 intersected Broadstone Road, I was smitten.

photo: Lauren Bell / Getty Images

The community in the early 1970s.

An unincorporated community of fewer than five hundred souls, Valle Crucis spreads over a gentle shelf of bottomland threaded by the swift waters of the Watauga River. It looks like a postcard from another era, and what it lacks in population it makes up for in character. Here is the original Mast General Store, the elegant Mast Farm Inn, and chef Andy Long’s dazzling Over Yonder restaurant. It’s also—and this would come to matter a great deal to us—home to the Valle Crucis Community Park.

My wife and I grew up in the mountains of South Carolina but had spent the last two decades moving. We’d lived in Charleston and Connecticut and done stints in Europe and Mexico. We were living in Florida at the time and eager to get closer to family, to the white pines, to the mountains. The way the slopes appear as velvet in the hazy distance—we were hungry for that, and bought a house two ridges over from Valle Crucis, in Sugar Grove. As soon as we’d settled, we drove our children to the park and promptly fell in love.

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The community park consists of twenty-eight acres of playgrounds, walking trails, and open spaces that stretch along the Watauga, mostly supported by donations and the generosity of the Friends of the Park. During the summer, children squeal on swing sets and drift in inner tubes, and folks fly fish or swish by, power walking in teal wind suits.

photo: Courtesy of Mast General Store

Inside Valle Crucis’s original Mast General Store.

Wednesday mornings, the High Country Audubon Society holds a bird walk there. Our son was and remains an avid bird-watcher, so we began taking him when he was seven for what I came to think of as “birding with the elderly.” I’d shunt him into the herd and then jog around the paved track, each time encountering the group staring into some treetop, having hardly advanced since my last lap. Occasionally, I’d even find my son with a pair of two-thousand-dollar binoculars strung around his neck, courtesy of a generous older birder, something that always got my heart racing more than the running. He’d bird while our daughter rode her bike, my hand hovering near the seat. We went nearly every day, and I thought I couldn’t possibly love the park more.

Then I heard about Music in the Valle. My friend Jimmy Davidson, a local musician, told me that every Friday from late May to early September, the park puts on a concert from six till dusk. It’s free and you don’t need a ticket. (A donation is appreciated but not required.) The music ranges from bluegrass to reggae, and pretty much everyone comes.

We went that first May evening and never stopped, seeing for ourselves the beauty of spring turning to summer in the mountains. The sky begins eggshell blue and then, around late afternoon, the day softens, goldens. Come evening the light goes gauzy, and then the fireflies start to wink and shudder, not in the woolly humidity of so much of the South, but in the airiness of elevation, the lazy sureness of a climate that has nothing to prove.

Those Fridays quickly became my favorite part of summer. I thought at first it was because Music in the Valle is what we might call “a doing.” Appalachian State students in sandals and bathing suits stand beside women dressed for a mountain cocktail party, barefoot and Empire-waisted on the greenest grass. Everywhere dogs. Everywhere children on bicycles, helmeted and laughing and waving as they wheel past. Folks spread quilts or fight with complex folding tables, then lay out cheese and prosciutto and wine in stainless-steel canteens. I like to bring a small cooler and visit the food trucks near the stage—the double burger from the Cardinal, a hot dog from Doggin’ It—while the music drifts by.

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It took me a while to realize that for all that, I love Valle Crucis for a deeper reason: My wife and I have measured our lives in that park, on those Fridays. That seven-year-old I kept nervously checking on while he glassed eastern bluebirds now fills in and leads birding walks himself. That daughter who needed me to hold the back of her bicycle has long since pedaled away.

One September evening not too long ago, I sat beside a friend as a V of Canada geese squawked overhead, flying south. It was the last concert of the season, and he nudged me.

“There goes our summer,” he said.

I looked for my children to point it out to them. When I realized they were off with friends, it came to me like a blow that summer wasn’t the only thing passing. But my God, how lucky we were, to sit in so beautiful a place, to mark time in the evening cool and the first blush of dark, on a blanket surrounded by people we love.

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Arkansas Global Connect Acquired by South Carolina Labor Consultant Firm

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Arkansas Global Connect Acquired by South Carolina Labor Consultant Firm


Arkansas Global Connect, formed in Conway in 2021 to arrange legal foreign labor for employers in the United States, has been acquired by BDV Solutions of Greenville, South Carolina.

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The two companies announced the purchase on Wednesday. The value of the cash and equity deal, which closed on Tuesday, was not revealed.

Dana Deree, CEO of AGC and one of its founders, will remain with BDV Solutions as vice president for seasonal workforce. AGC currently employs 11, three in Arkansas and the rest in Honduras, and all of them will continue working for BDV.

Deree spent 20 years in the U.S. Foreign Service, ultimately as consul general in Honduras, where he helped improve the employer-seasonal worker process. That experience led him and three others to invest $50,000 each to found AGC with the mission of providing American employers with an efficient pipeline of reliable, legal seasonal workers from abroad while opening a door of economic opportunity for job seekers.

“I’ll always be proud of the AGC team, which has met a tremendous need in the U.S. economy, helped keep prices down for consumers and strengthened the food chain while providing good-paying, legal opportunities for foreign nationals who can better provide for their families while building a hopeful future in their home communities,” Deree said in a news release.

BDV shares AGC’s “vision for acting ethically and in the best interest of both workers and employers,” he said.

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In two and a half years, AGC placed seasonal workers with more than 200 employers in more than 30 states, Deree said. And while the company has been profitable from its first year, the business plan did not turn out to be what he and his partners expected. Instead of placing mainly farm workers with H-2A agricultural visas, AGC has mainly recruited and placed non-agricultural seasonal workers using the H-2B visa program, which the Biden administration expanded in the face of widespread worker shortages.

“Our logo is farm fields because I thought we would do 98% farm workers because there would not be enough H-2Bs available,” Deree said. “Instead, we’ve been so busy with H-2Bs that AGC has done very little farm labor.”



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