Connect with us

Oklahoma

Oklahoma wheat much improved in 2024

Published

on

Oklahoma wheat much improved in 2024


Wheat producers in Southwest Oklahoma are hoping for one more good rain and a crop much better than they’ve seen in several years.

Across the state, conditions are mixed as farmers near harvest.

“We’ve just started crop tours,” says Oklahoma State University Extension Small Grains Specialist Amanda de Oliveira Silva, Stillwater.

“Wheat near Altus looks good,” Silva says. “We’ve seen some stripe rust that came in earlier than usual, but overall the crop looks good. Wheat in the Northwestern part of the state does not look good. Some fields started off good but are going backwards. It’s dry; they need rain.”

Advertisement

‘Hit or miss’ wheat conditions

Silva says wheat in West Oklahoma, near Sentinel and some other parts of the state, is in a “hit or miss” situation. Wheat that received the latest rains looks good, but there is some that missed a lot of rain, so we see short wheat, thinner stands, and some damage from early-season stripe rust infestation. Overall, I think we are in a much better shape than we were the past two years, but we could still use some rain, especially on the West, the Northwest, and North Central areas.”

She says acres for harvest likely will be down from earlier expectations as there were some people that had the field disastered out or are grazing out the wheat. I thought in early spring, we could have a bumper crop, but as conditions get drier in some places, yields will not be as high as we thought. Next week, at the Oklahoma Grain and Feed Association annual meeting, we will have harvest estimates from each region.

Oklahoma cautiously optimistic for cotton

“We’re better than last year, but we’re off from a month ago as conditions get drier and storm chances with possible hail damage increases in some regions.”

Advertisement

Stripe rust

Stripe rust came in earlier than usual at around wheat jointing stage, Silva says.

“Farmers sprayed fungicide early for stripe rust. I’ve heard that as much as 90% of the wheat in Southwest Oklahoma was sprayed for stripe rust. That’s atypical, but we had a lot of it.

“A big issue was that most of the wheat varieties grown in Oklahoma do not have seedling resistance against stripe rust, they only have the adult plant resistance (and not all varieties have the adult plant resistance either). So, what happens is that the adult plant resistance genes only get turned on after flag leaf stage. As stripe rust came in earlier than that, the genes were not activated and could not protect the plant.

osu-silva-stripe-rust-field-web.jpg

“We have seen a lot of damage in Southwest Oklahoma. Some varieties have performed better than others.”

Advertisement

AI tech conference closes gap between researchers, farmers

Conditions that favor good wheat growth also favor rust, she adds.

English grain aphids

OSU Extension IPM Coordinator Ashleigh Faris says she’s seen some English grain aphids in some areas. “They are not typically economically important in Oklahoma, but they can transmit the barley dwarf virus, so it is worth paying attention to them in the field.

“The other ones we’re seeing are the bird cherry oat aphids. Numbers are low though, and every time I see these aphids, I’m also seeing a lot of natural enemies. So we’re seeing lady beetle larvae and lady beetle adults, and they’re all pretty voracious.”

Faris says considering crop maturity and natural predation, growers shouldn’t need to spray these pests. “The good news is the natural enemies are helping to manage the aphid populations.

Advertisement

“Some areas are still holding up yield potential,” Silva says. “Wheat at Apache, in South Central Oklahoma, looks great. Chickasha looks great.

“I think the main lesson for producers this year will be stripe rust resistance. We’re seeing one of the heaviest stripe rust pressures we have seen in a long time. Now, as it starts getting drier and drier, that’s another story.”

Silva says that if the weather conditions remain warm, many wheat farmers will harvest early, but cool temperatures should help the wheat slowly down and properly fill the grain. Southwest Oklahoma farmers are especially excited. They have not seen a crop like this in a long time. We all need a win.”

Farmers have herbicide options despite dicamba ruling





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Oklahoma

Live updates: Severe weather, with potential for tornadoes, forecast to move through Oklahoma

Published

on

Live updates: Severe weather, with potential for tornadoes, forecast to move through Oklahoma


play

Oklahoma is bracing for yet another round of severe weather Saturday evening.

According to the National Weather Service, all potential hazards are possible, including high winds, hail, heavy rain, and tornadoes.

Advertisement

This article will be updated through the night as the weather develops across the state.

Severe thunderstorms have crossed into Oklahoma from Texas. Most of Oklahoma remains under a tornado watch until 11 p.m.

Organizers of the Paseo Arts Festival announced on Facebook that the event will be closing at 5 p.m. Saturday. The festival will return from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. on Sunday, and from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. on Monday.

Riverwind Casino in Norman announced its Beats and Bites event has been postponed until a later date. Tickets to the event can be refunded.

Prepare for severe weather now

Regardless of any particular forecast, here are some things you can do to get ready for Oklahoma’s severe weather season.

Advertisement
  • Figure out now where you’ll go if you need to seek shelter; there are no public shelters in Oklahoma City
  • If you have access to a storm shelter, clean it out and get ready to use it
  • Get a flashlight and spare batteries
  • If you own a weather radio, make sure it’s programmed and working properly
  • Identify your source for immediate weather information, like from local meteorologists
  • Sit down with your family and discuss what to do if there is a tornado threat
  • Do you have pets? Make sure there’s a plan to keep your furry friends safe and secure

Oklahoma rainfall totals

Find daily rainfall totals using this Oklahoma Mesonet rainfall map.



Source link

Continue Reading

Oklahoma

OKLAHOMA LEGISLATION ‘RIPE FOR ABUSE BY LITIGIOUS INDIVIDUALS’

Published

on

OKLAHOMA LEGISLATION ‘RIPE FOR ABUSE BY LITIGIOUS INDIVIDUALS’


In politics, there is often a gap between the stated intentions for legislation and the real-world consequences. That’s the case with a bill approved by the Oklahoma Legislature this year. What was touted as an effort to protect women from stalkers would instead allow typical Oklahomans to be sued for …

PLEASE LOG IN FOR PREMIUM CONTENT. Our website requires visitors to log in to view the best local news. Not yet a subscriber? Subscribe today!





Source link

Continue Reading

Oklahoma

The Ripple Effect Of Great Leadership With Oklahoma’s Leah Beasley

Published

on

The Ripple Effect Of Great Leadership With Oklahoma’s Leah Beasley


Oklahoma Executive Associate AD Leah Beasley joins ADU’s Tai M. Brown at the 2024 PACnet Conference to discuss the ripple effects of great leaders on department culture and the fan experience. Beasley also discusses the intangible ROI of unexpected, spur of the moment marketing efforts on brand-building: “How well are we telling our story?” Beasley and Brown also explore the value of “forced collaboration” or having an arena where the entire staff can get on the same page and the core values of transparency and trust.

The conversation is indexed below for efficient viewing (click the time stamp to jump to a specific question/topic).



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending