Connect with us

Oklahoma

Oklahoma Music Minutes for February 12-16: Music you should hear this week

Published

on

Oklahoma Music Minutes for February 12-16: Music you should hear this week


Monday, February 12

Love Seats are from Oklahoma City. Find more of their music at linktr.ee/Loveseats.

Tuesday, February 13

Advertisement

Berta B is from Oklahoma City. Find more of their music at linktr.ee/BertaBmusic.

Wednesday, February 14

Cowtippers are from Stillwater. Find more of their music at instagram.com/cow.tipperss.

Advertisement

Thursday, February 15

It’s Throwback Thursday on the Oklahoma Music Minute. Known for hit songs like “Should’ve Been A Cowboy” and “How Do You Like Me Now?,” country music superstar Toby Keith died on February 5th after a long battle with stomach cancer. Find out more about him here.

Friday, February 16

The Ivy are from Tulsa. Find more of their music at linktr.ee/wearetheivy.

Advertisement

The Oklahoma Music Minute airs weekdays on KOSU at 6:19 a.m., 8:19 a.m., 11:38 a.m., 3:18 p.m., and 5:18 p.m.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Oklahoma

Javian McCollum’s OT buzzer-beater lifts Oklahoma over OSU in final game of Bedlam

Published

on

Javian McCollum’s OT buzzer-beater lifts Oklahoma over OSU in final game of Bedlam


Javian McCollum’s dramatic 3-pointer as time expired in overtime gave Oklahoma an 84-82 victory over Oklahoma State on Saturday, sending the basketball version of Bedlam out with a bang.

Oklahoma had called timeout with 12.5 seconds left and McCollum took the ball on the inbounds. After taking a few seconds off the clock, he tried to penetrate to the left side but was cut off. He stepped back behind the 3-point line, took a dribble to his left and launched with about a second to go. The ball went through the net as time ran out, leaving no chance for a miracle heave by the Cowboys.

After a back-and-forth first 3 1/2 minutes of overtime, John-Michael Wright’s 3-pointer gave the Cowboys an 82-81 lead with 1:28 remaining.

Neither team scored again until McCollum’s buzzer-beating game-winner in the final scheduled matchup between the two teams as conference rivals. Oklahoma is leaving the Big 12 to join the Southeastern Conference next season.

Advertisement

Sports Roundup

Get the latest D-FW sports news, analysis, scores and more.

Toward the end of regulation, OSU’s Javon Small scored on a layup to tie the score at 72 with 42 seconds left. Oklahoma then ran the game clock down to 16 seconds before McCollum missed at the rim and Small grabbed the rebound for the Cowboys. He drew a foul and with 4.3 seconds left but missed the front end of the one-and-one, sending the game to overtime.

Rivaldo Soares led Oklahoma (19-8, 7-7 Big 12) with 20 points on 7-of-9 shooting and Otega Oweh scored 16 points on 8-of-10 shooting. McCollum and Milos Uzan scored 14 each and Jalon Moore had 11 points with 14 rebounds.

Small and Quion Williams each scored 21 points for Oklahoma State (12-15, 4-10). Eric Dailey Jr. had 20 points and nine rebounds off the bench.

Advertisement

Both teams shot well and took good care of the ball. Oklahoma State shot 57% and had nine turnovers; the Sooners hit 51% of their shots and had eight turnovers.

The biggest lead of the first 12 minutes was Oklahoma State’s five-point advantage at 22-17 near the eight-minute mark. The Cowboys went on a 16-8 run to go up by 11 in the final minute, then OU’s Soares hit a 3-pointer to make it 38-30 at halftime.

Up next for Oklahoma is a trip to Ames, Iowa, to play No. 6 Iowa State on Wednesday. Oklahoma State’s next game is at home against UCF on Wednesday.

    10 prospects the Dallas Cowboys should target in first round of 2024 NFL draft
    With 12-team playoff set, CFP already discussing possibly more teams for 2026 and beyond

Find more Oklahoma coverage from The Dallas Morning News here.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Oklahoma

Anti-LGBTQ actions, laws and policies in Oklahoma – Dallas Voice

Published

on

Anti-LGBTQ actions, laws and policies in Oklahoma – Dallas Voice


Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt, left, and Superintendent of Public Instruction Ryan Walters, right.

The Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation today (Saturday, Feb. 24) released the following information regarding the anti-LGBTQ actions, laws and policies by Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt and Oklahoma Superintendent of Public Instruction Ryan Walters:

“In the months and years leading to the bullying and assault on Nex Benedict, Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt has signed into law legislation that bans best-practice, life-saving medical care for transgender youth, bans trans youth from using the school bathroom aligned with their gender, and bans trans youth from playing sports at school with their friends.

Advertisement

“Gov. Stitt’s record of anti-LGBTQ legislation, policy and rhetoric is documented here.

“Gov. Stitt appointed, then removed, Ryan Walters as his education secretary. Walters remains state superintendent of public instruction, where he has repeatedly used his position to target LGBTQ youth, spread fear and disinformation about them, ban inclusive books, and use taxpayer funds to support his appearances on extremist media.

“Gov. Stitt’s actions include:

  • Signed law restricting access to public-school bathrooms aligned with gender identity

  • Signed law banning health care for transgender people under 18. Every major medical association and leading world health authority supports health care for transgender youth.

  • Signed a law that bans transgender girls and women from school sports. Oklahoma public schools also now require all students from kindergarten to college to complete “biological sex affidavits” to be eligible, an invasive, unnecessary, and costly barrier to every female student.

  • Signed a bill that would prohibit Oklahomans from obtaining nonbinary gender markers on official documents

“Oklahoma State Superintendent of Public Instruction Ryan Walters’ anti-LGBTQ record is documented here.

“Superintendent Walters’ record includes:

Advertisement
  • Released inaccurate and inflammatory video falsely describing transgender students as a threat in school bathrooms. Transgender students are three times more likely to miss school than other students, are more likely to report feeling unsafe at school and being bullied, and face a higher risk of sexual assault in locker rooms and bathrooms that don’t match gender identity

  • Led the Oklahoma State Board of Education in approving a permanent rule change that prohibits school districts and local schools from altering sex or gender designations in student records without the board’s authorization and regardless of the will of the student or the consent of the student’s guardians. A lawsuit is pending in federal court.

  • Advocates for book bans, including at this week’s board hearing, falsely describing LGBTQ-inclusive books as “pornographic” and that they “push transgenderism,” a term frequently weaponized to diminish or eliminate transgender identity and the existence of transgender people throughout history.

  • Appointed Chaya Raichik, the founder of anti-LGBTQ social media account Libs of TikTok, to a Library Media Advisory Committee at the Oklahoma State Department of Education. The account posts disinformation about LGBTQ people and allies, and some posts have reportedly preceded dozens of bomb threats to schools in Oklahoma as well as libraries and children’s hospitals nationwide. Raichick is not an educator, is not an Oklahoma resident, and does not have children in Oklahoma schools.

  • Had Oklahoma taxpayers fund travel expenses for speaking engagements and media appearances with anti-LGBTQ groups Moms for Liberty and Heritage Foundation, as well as a premiere for an anti-abortion horror movie, meetings with bookers from Fox News in Washington, DC, and for media appearances on talk shows affiliated with the conspiracy-fueled Epoch Times. State law prohibits expensing out of state travel.

“Additional background

  • ACLU is tracking 54 anti-LGBTQ bills in Oklahoma, leading the nation for proposals targeting LGBTQ people this legislative session

  • The FBI reported that from 2018 to 2022, the number of hate crimes in schools nearly doubled. Research from GLAAD and the Center on Extremism counted 700+ anti-LGBTQ incidents of extremism including violence, assaults, murders, or vandalism last year.”





Source link

Continue Reading

Oklahoma

Oklahoma bill would shield poultry companies from lawsuits over chicken litter pollution

Published

on

Oklahoma bill would shield poultry companies from lawsuits over chicken litter pollution


As Oklahoma wraps up a nearly 20-year lawsuit against several large poultry companies over chicken litter pollution in its eastern waterways, state lawmakers have advanced a bill to remove liability from companies in the future, giving them what environmentalists have called a “license to pollute.” 

House Bill 4118, authored by State Rep. David Hardin, a Republican from Stilwell, would “insulate the poultry grower, integrator, and waste applicator from any private right of action” as long as they have an approved Nutrient Management Plan from the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry.

Poultry farm operators must submit a Nutrient Management Plan to the state demonstrating how they will safely remove and reuse chicken litter, which is often sold to area farms as fertilizer. 

Advertisement

But Hardin’s bill says that even if a poultry operator violated its Nutrient Management Plan, it would still avoid liability. 

“I can’t think of another industry that has this type of immunity,” said Matt Wright, chairman of the Conservation Coalition of Oklahoma, a nonprofit that opposes the bill it calls a “license to pollute.” “If an oil and gas company had a spill but said they at least had a plan that tried to avoid the spill, they can still be held liable.” 

The bill received unanimous approval by the Oklahoma House Committee on Agriculture last week and was advanced by the full House on Monday.

In 2005, then-Attorney General Drew Edmondson sued several large poultry companies, including Tyson Foods, Cargill, Cal-Maine Foods and Simmons Foods, for causing increased levels of phosphorus, E. coli and nitrogen in the Illinois River Watershed.

Advertisement

A federal judge ruled in favor of the state last year, but the case is still unresolved after a court-ordered mediation between the state and the companies broke down. 

Since the lawsuit was filed, Oklahoma’s poultry industry has continued to grow, topping 200 million birds a year, according to licensing records from the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry.

Hardin, the bill’s author, said he wanted to protect poultry farmers from similar lawsuits in the future. 

“We have stringent rules through the Department of Agriculture to protect our environment, and Nutrient Management Plans are really precise on the amount of litter that you can spread or if you can spread it all,” Hardin told Investigate Midwest during an interview in his Capitol office. 

Advertisement

“This bill doesn’t mean that somebody can’t come in and bring some sort of action, but you bring it against the state. We set the rules and (the companies follow) the rules that we set and then they get stuck in lawsuits over rules we set. All I’m saying is if you’re going to sue, sue the state.” 

Hardin’s bill originally had language making the protection from litigation retroactive, but it was removed before its hearing in the full House. 

Even if the language had remained, it likely would not have impacted current lawsuits as the state’s Constitution bars the state Legislature from imposing new laws that end ongoing lawsuits.

Oklahoma Attorney General Gentner Drummond, who has continued the federal lawsuit against Tyson and other poultry producers, asked the judge last year to impose new standards on the poultry companies. Drummond’s office declined to comment on Hardin’s bill and its potential impact on the case. 

Advertisement

State Rep. Arturo Alonso-Sandoval, a Democrat from Oklahoma City, voted in favor of the bill during its committee hearing. But he later told Investigate Midwest he wouldn’t support the bill moving forward after learning more details. 

“The more I think about (this bill), the more I think we have a responsibility to take care of our constituents, not these large corporations,” Alonso-Sandoval said. “Besides, we’ve had a history of environmental problems, so why risk going back to where we were before?” 

Alonso-Sandoval voted against the bill during its hearing before the full House, joining the rest of the Democratic caucus in opposition. 

Democratic lawmakers spent nearly 45 minutes questioning Hardin on his bill during Monday’s hearing, including State Rep. Mickey Dollens who said he believed the bill was an act of “deregulating” an industry that has caused pollution problems in the state for years. 

“It is reprehensible and quite disgusting that we are debating a bill that prioritizes big ag and corporate lobbyists over our citizens and their drinking water,” said Dollens, who is a Demcorat from Oklahoma City.

Advertisement

However, House Bill 4118 was approved by the House’s Republican majority with a vote of 68 to 28. The bill now moves to the State Senate for consideration. 

Poultry litter waste in eastern Oklahoma

The growing poultry industry in eastern Oklahoma is largely made up of industrial farms that raise several hundred thousand birds at a time. A building with 100,000 chickens can produce 750 tons of litter a year.

Most of that litter is sold to area farmers as fertilizer.

“Animal manure and poultry litter contain all 16 essential plant nutrients as well as organic matter. … thus, manure can be a valuable asset to a poultry operation if its nutrients and organic matter are recycled through land application properly,” according to Oklahoma State University’s current guide on Nutrient Management Plans. However, “(p)oultry litter may cause surface and groundwater pollution if mismanaged or over-applied.”

Advertisement

The state’s 2005 lawsuit claimed chicken litter in eastern Oklahoma was being over-applied and ending up in streams and rivers. Rising phosphorus had decreased oxygen in the water, which was killing fish and increasing filtration costs for the more than one dozen towns that relied on the Illinois River Watershed for drinking water. 

Over the last several years, more chicken litter has been shipped out of state, and some measures have been taken to protect waterways, such as vegetative buffer strips between a crop field and a nearby stream. 

Lawmakers in support of the bill argued that declining phosphorus rates are proof that Nutrient Management Plans are working. 

“We are making extreme progress every day cleaning up our waterways,” State Rep. Jim Grego, R-Wilburton, said in support of the bill before Monday’s vote. “This bill here, all it does is protect farmers.” 

Grego and other lawmakers referenced a 2019 report from the Oklahoma Conservation Commission that said the state was a leader in the number of waterways removed from the federal list of impaired waterbodies. 

Advertisement

But while phosphorus rates have decreased, some remain well above state standards. 

Last year, a water quality report found maximum phosphorus rates higher than the state standard of 0.037 milligrams per liter in 13 eastern Oklahoma waterways. In the Illinois River, near the town of Watts, the maximum phosphorus rate recorded was 1.153 milligrams per liter, and as high as 0.438 milligrams per liter near Tahlequah. 

Wright, president of the Conservation Coalition of Oklahoma, said the poultry industry is an important economic sector for the state but he worried further pollution could hurt other industries, including tourism. 

“In the eastern part of the state, you have the Illinois River and the Mountain Fork (River), both of which rely heavily on tourism,” Wright said. “If there is a huge fish kill or people start getting sick, it will have a huge impact on (the tourism) industry.” 

Violators of Nutrient Management Plans would still be protected

Hardin’s claim that a Nutrient Management Plan should be enough to protect poultry companies from legal action is the same argument Tyson Foods made last year when the company sought a motion to dismiss the state’s lawsuit. 

Advertisement

“These plans, which set forth the time, location, and amount of poultry litter that may be applied to each parcel of land, have now ensured that, for well over a decade, the state has consented to and even controlled all poultry-litter applications,” Tyson attorneys wrote in the motion to dismiss.  

Marvin Childers, president of the Poultry Federation, a lobbying group many Oklahoma poultry companies direct the media to for comment, said his organization is tracking HB 4118, but didn’t offer an opinion on the measure. 

“It has a long way to go in the legislative process,” Childers said in an emailed statement to Investigate Midwest. 

While poultry companies, like Tyson, say they should be protected from litigation if they are following state-approved plans, Hardin’s bill includes language that could also protect both poultry companies and the farmers they contract with if they stray from those plans. 

Advertisement

The bill states, “Land application of poultry litter in compliance with a current Nutrient Management Plan shall not be the basis for criminal or civil liability in Oklahoma, … nor shall an administrative violation be the basis for a criminal or civil action.”

Asked what constitutes an “administrative violation,” Lee Benson, a spokesperson for the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry, said it is any violation the agency deals with.

Asked about that language, Hardin said if a poultry farmer violated state rules the company would likely terminate its contract. 

During Monday’s House debate, Hardin claimed the bill would not protect violators. 

“If you are not in compliance (with the Nutrient Management Plan), this bill does not cover you,” Hardin said. 

Advertisement

Recent state laws help the poultry industry

Despite the state’s lawsuit against poultry companies and water pollution rates above state standards, the Oklahoma Legislature and the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture continuously have made it easier for poultry operators to open new farms and avoid pushback from neighbors. 

Ten years ago, the state made it easier for industrial poultry farms to open closer to homes and water sources by offering an alternative registration system. 

Last year, the Legislature passed a new law that dismisses protests against a poultry farm’s application for a water use permit, if the protest is “based solely on the industry or entity applying to use the water.” 

Some Oklahomans have protested new water use permits and filed lawsuits against the state, arguing not enough research was done before giving new farms access to groundwater.

Advertisement

This year, an earlier version of Hardin’s bill sought to deregulate the poultry industry even further as it removed bans on poultry litter creating “an environmental or a public health hazard.” That draft also removed the state ban on the “discharge of poultry waste to waters of the state.” 

Hardin removed that language before last week’s committee hearing, focusing specifically on the litigation aspect. 

“I thought that might be a little bit too far, so I said let’s pull it back,” Hardin said about the changes he made to the bill. 

Hardin has also faced criticism about his wife’s involvement in the poultry industry. She formerly consulted with Simmons Foods to write Nutrient Management Plans for its chicken farmers, but Hardin said she stopped working for the company once he began running poultry-related bills a few years ago. Hardin’s 2022 financial disclosure reported his wife’s work with Simmons Foods, but his 2024 disclosure no longer showed her work with the poultry company. Simmons Foods did not respond to a request for comment on Hardin’s wife. 

“I’m not going to be Terry O’Donnell,” Hardin told two Democratic lawmakers after last week’s committee meeting on his bill. 

Advertisement

O’Donnell, a former state representative, was indicted by an Oklahoma County grand jury in 2021 after he introduced a bill that removed the ban on spouses of lawmakers from serving as agents of a vehicle registration center, or tag agency. Months after the bill passed, O’Donnell’s wife took over a tag agency in Catoosa. The case was later dropped. 

Hardin said his wife’s former work gave him unique insight into what’s involved with the disposal of chicken litter. 

“I’ve seen what all you have to go through to create these Nutrient Management Plans and you have to go through all this training,” said Hardin, who added he believes the state’s requirements for poultry farmers are sufficient. “But if a poultry farmer has actually followed the Nutrient Management Plan then you’ll need to bring that lawsuit to the Department of Agriculture.”

Investigate Midwest is an independent, nonprofit newsroom. Our mission is to serve the public interest by exposing dangerous and costly practices of influential agricultural corporations and institutions through in-depth and data-driven investigative journalism. Visit us online at www.investigatemidwest.org



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending