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Utah Royals FC Wraps Up Three Match Road Stint In North Carolina | Utah Royals

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Utah Royals FC Wraps Up Three Match Road Stint In North Carolina |  Utah Royals


HERRIMAN, Utah (Thursday, May 16, 2024) – Utah Royals FC (1-7-1, 4 pts, 14th NWSL) finishes its three-match road stint against North Carolina Courage (4-5-0, 12 pts, 6th NWSL) on Friday at Wakemed Soccer Park with kickoff slated for 8:00pm ET.

The Royals make their debut on Amazon Prime against North Carolina Courage after suffering a Sunday afternoon 3-1 loss to Chicago Red Stars where Cameron Tucker notched her first competitive professional goal. Receiving a pass from fellow BYU graduate, Michele Vasconcelos, Tucker cut inside, beating one player before unleashing a missile to the upper right corner of the Chicago goal from 25+ yards out. The goal scored in the 81st minute brought new life to the Royals, but the squad was ultimately unable to utilize the momentum, conceding a third goal in stoppage time, 90+7’.

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This is the second time that head coach Amy Rodriguez’s side will play an opponent they have faced before this season, the first being the Red Stars whom the Royals opened the season against. In the first meeting between the two sides, Utah triumphed behind Ally Sentnor’s incredible first professional goal and a header from Kate Del Fava, despite North Carolina recording a 2.3 xG. The Royals have quietly been improving while simultaneously playing their collective brand of soccer dictated by Rodriguez and her staff, maintaining possession and picking their moments to attack.

WATCH LIVE on AMAZON PRIME :: Utah Royals FC vs. North Carolina Courage | Wakemed Soccer Park | 6:00 p.m. MT |

LISTEN via KSL Sports Radio (102.7 FM / 1160 AM) starting at 5:00 p.m. MT

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The Courage currently sit in 6th in the NWSL standings, having suffered five losses this season, but recording no draws. North Carolina enters this match on the heels of a three-match road trip which saw them score one goal and concede six enroute to three straight losses. Returning home, they will look to leverage their friendly crowd to pull themselves out of the downward spiral.

Following Friday’s match in North Carolina, the Royals will return to America First Field on May 25 to take on Kansas City Current at 8:00 p.m. MT (tickets are available at https://www.rsl.com/utahroyals/tickets/single).

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North Carolina

To commemorate Memorial Day veterans demand Trump and NC Republicans stop threatening violence • NC Newsline

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To commemorate Memorial Day veterans demand Trump and NC Republicans stop threatening violence • NC Newsline


On Memorial Day I reflect on two deaths from the 9/11 wars, and what, from the comfort of my home as the chirping of the spring birds greets the dawn, I owe them. One was a Marine I only knew for an hour or so, and the other was a close friend of years and deployments.

The Marine died because he took a few seconds to push his men off of a rooftop first and didn’t jump down the stairwell to safety when he could have. He waited his turn, which as a leader, was to go last.

A bullet hit him in the back, just above the plate in his body armor, traveled through his chest, and exited the front. When I removed his body armor, the ugly little piece of metal fell into the hands of another Marine helping me work on him.

We tried the best we could, with what we had, but he died quickly and silently, in the shadows of a rooftop staircase in Iraq. He was from Georgia, and he is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

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My close friend died as a member of a special mission unit. At the time, the terrorist network run by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, who commanded al-Qaida in Iraq, was strapping bombs on special needs children and adults and walking them into crowded marketplaces, and a raid targeting those jihadists resulted in his death.

My friend and another SEAL were clearing a room that held a hidden bunker and a machine gun, awaiting their entry. Both men were killed instantly. I learned of his death from a mutual friend on a snowy day in northern Vermont, working as a lab technician while I applied to medical school. My friend was from New Hampshire and is also buried in Arlington.

Both of these men are with me now and will always be. Their sacrifice, of all they were and would ever be, took away from them all the fruits our nation have enjoyed. T-ball games on warm spring days, hot cocoa fireside in a snowstorm, and love, community, and family were all sacrificed in dank little buildings in Iraq.

Making sense of their deaths, for me, was only possible if I viewed their sacrifice as a gift. It makes sense that my friend gave his life for me. It made sense that the young Marine gave his life, quite literally, in my stead.

Or at least that’s how I try to see it.

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And while I can never repay what these men gave me, I can try to earn it by accepting the Sisyphean task of living a “good life.” Their gift was not free of obligation, or duty, and while it can never be repaid, it can be earned.

As I think through the meaning of Memorial Day, to honor all those who lost their lives in defense of America, I wonder what would these two men who live inside me feel about our democracy today?

On Friday, I am joining a coalition of veterans, including past leaders of the North Carolina National Guard, concerned about this issue. We are gathering at Greensboro’s Guilford Courthouse National Military Park.

Across the city, the state Republican Party is holding its annual gathering, which will include members of the Republican National Committee, like new co-chair former president Donald Trump’s daughter-in-law Lara Trump. In attendance at the GOP event are multiple individuals, who echo Trump’s doubts about the legitimacy of U.S. elections and his refusal to commit to accepting this year’s results.

The former president, who has displayed an unprecedented disrespect for military service over the years, has also repeatedly threatened violence if the election does not go his way.

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We are demanding that Republican leaders now in Greensboro use all their influence to force Donald Trump to renounce these awful and dangerous threats of violence, which have no place in a democracy. Trump must commit to a peaceful and non-violent election season.

We have a duty to our fallen brothers and sisters, whom we honor this weekend. They fought battles abroad so we can live in a country free of such threats. Who among us will not honor their sacrifice?



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N.C. residents sue to remove monument dedicated to ‘our faithful slaves’

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N.C. residents sue to remove monument dedicated to ‘our faithful slaves’


A group representing Black residents in a small North Carolina county has filed a federal lawsuit against local officials demanding that a 122-year-old monument outside a courthouse that honors “faithful slaves” be removed.

Since 1902, a 23-foot-tall statue of a Confederate soldier has stood outside the Tyrrell County Courthouse in Columbia, N.C. The zinc statue rests on a base featuring a bust of Robert E. Lee and the inscription: “IN APPRECIATION OF OUR FAITHFUL SLAVES.”



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State officials: No NC recreational flounder season in 2024

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State officials: No NC recreational flounder season in 2024



The N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries announced the recreational flounder season will not open this year “in order to preserve the southern flounder resource.”

Citing continuing pressures on the fishery, state officials announced Thursday that there will be no recreational flounder season in 2024.

The move comes after years of smaller and smaller windows for recreational fishermen to catch the popular fish, culminating in last year’s short two-week harvest window.

But officials said even that short fishing period was too much for the already depleted flounder fishery.

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“Estimates from 2023 indicate the recreational catch exceeded the quota allowed under a stock rebuilding plan that was included in Amendment 3 to the Southern Flounder Fishery Management Plan and adopted by the N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission,” stated a release from the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries.

Under current rules, exceeding a quota in one year means the following year’s allowable catch number must be reduced by the amount that exceeded the limit.

“After subtracting the recreational overage from 2023, the recreational quota remaining for 2024 is not large enough to allow for a season opening. The leftover quota will be used to account for the anticipated dead discards that will occur due to incidental catch and release,” states the release.

“The commission discussed holding a special meeting to consider alternatives to not holding a 2024 recreational season but ultimately did not move forward with that approach.” 

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The state’s move on Thursday continues a series of steps that regulators hope will help the struggling fishery rebound, although the moves have frustrated local anglers who never had to deal with a closed flounder season until 2019 and watch neighboring states adopt much less stringent rules.

NEW RULES COMING: Catch a flounder or red drum? NC recreational fishermen will soon have to report it

Among the responses to the restrictions on the fishery, which many recreational fishermen see as heavy handed, has been a lawsuit filed by the Coastal Conservation Association of North Carolina alleging the state has mismanaged its coastal fisheries, including flounder.

Pressures on the flounder fishery have been growing for decades, with recreational fishermen and commercial fishermen blaming each other for depleting near-shore flounder populations.

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Climate change is another concern among scientists, with warming sea temperatures potentially impacting the sex ratio of the fishery. Since juvenile flounders hang out in shallow, inland estuary waters, warmer water temperatures likely trigger more of the fish to be male. That also could be a growing problem because female flounders grow bigger than males, and thus are more highly sought than the smaller males.

For the past two years, recreational fishermen have caught more flounder than allowed under the recreational quota approved by the marine fisheries commission in the N.C. Southern Flounder Fishery Management Plan Amendment 3. The amendment, adopted in May 2022, called for a 72% reduction in the southern flounder harvest, with both commercial and recreational fisheries seeing dramatic cuts.

Reporter Gareth McGrath can be reached at GMcGrath@Gannett.com or @GarethMcGrathSN on X/Twitter. This story was produced with financial support from the Green South Foundation and the Prentice Foundation. The USA TODAY Network maintains full editorial control of the work. 



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