Connect with us

Maryland

Dogs coming down with unusual illness in multiple states, including Maryland

Published

on

Dogs coming down with unusual illness in multiple states, including Maryland


It’s dangerous and could be deadly. Now, a virus affecting dogs across the country is in Maryland. Veterinary laboratories in several states are investigating an unusual respiratory illness in dogs, and encouraging people to take basic precautions



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Maryland

Catholic Men’s Fellowship of Maryland returns March 9 – Catholic Review

Published

on

Catholic Men’s Fellowship of Maryland returns March 9 – Catholic Review


jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
$(‘#facebook-before-240875’).sharrre({
share: {
facebook: true
},
urlCurl: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/plugins/genesis-simple-share/assets/js/sharrre/sharrre.php’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
disableCount: true,
buttons: { },
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘facebook’);
}
});
$(‘#twitter-before-240875’).sharrre({
share: {
twitter: true
},
urlCurl: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/plugins/genesis-simple-share/assets/js/sharrre/sharrre.php’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
disableCount: true,
buttons: { twitter: { via: ‘CatholicReview’ } },
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘twitter’);
}
});
$(‘#pinterest-before-240875’).sharrre({
share: {
pinterest: true
},
urlCurl: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/plugins/genesis-simple-share/assets/js/sharrre/sharrre.php’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
disableCount: true,
buttons: { pinterest: { media: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/02/BARRY-Barbara-6-2019-ge.jpg’, description: ‘Sister Barbara Barry, O.S.F., dies at 89’ } },
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘pinterest’);
}
});
$(‘#linkedin-before-240875’).sharrre({
share: {
linkedin: true
},
urlCurl: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/plugins/genesis-simple-share/assets/js/sharrre/sharrre.php’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
disableCount: true,
buttons: { },
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘linkedin’);
}
});

});

A funeral Mass for Franciscan Sister Barbara Barry will be offered March 8 at St. Francis Convent in St. Francis, Wis. Sister Barbara (formerly known as Sister Agnes) died Jan. 27. She was 89.

jQuery(document).ready(function($) {
$(‘#facebook-after-240875’).sharrre({
share: {
facebook: true
},
urlCurl: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/plugins/genesis-simple-share/assets/js/sharrre/sharrre.php’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
disableCount: true,
buttons: { },
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘facebook’);
}
});
$(‘#twitter-after-240875’).sharrre({
share: {
twitter: true
},
urlCurl: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/plugins/genesis-simple-share/assets/js/sharrre/sharrre.php’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
disableCount: true,
buttons: { twitter: { via: ‘CatholicReview’ } },
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘twitter’);
}
});
$(‘#pinterest-after-240875’).sharrre({
share: {
pinterest: true
},
urlCurl: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/plugins/genesis-simple-share/assets/js/sharrre/sharrre.php’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
disableCount: true,
buttons: { pinterest: { media: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/02/BARRY-Barbara-6-2019-ge.jpg’, description: ‘Sister Barbara Barry, O.S.F., dies at 89’ } },
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘pinterest’);
}
});
$(‘#linkedin-after-240875’).sharrre({
share: {
linkedin: true
},
urlCurl: ‘https://catholicreview.org/wp-content/plugins/genesis-simple-share/assets/js/sharrre/sharrre.php’,
enableHover: false,
enableTracking: true,
disableCount: true,
buttons: { },
click: function(api, options){
api.simulateClick();
api.openPopup(‘linkedin’);
}
});

Advertisement

});

Continue Reading Sister Barbara Barry, O.S.F., dies at 89



Source link

Continue Reading

Maryland

Maryland Legislature considers online privacy bill. AG says resources needed to enforce.

Published

on

Maryland Legislature considers online privacy bill. AG says resources needed to enforce.


A sponsor of legislation that is now being considered by the Maryland General Assembly and designed to protect residents’ privacy online called the current data environment in the United States “almost like the Wild Wild West.”

The bill, backed by state Sen. Arthur Ellis, D-Charles, and others, requires only personal data that is “reasonably necessary” be collected for a specific product or service as requested by a consumer. That “data” can sometimes be as personal as someone’s own fingerprint or face.

In 2022, the American facial recognition software company Clearview AI settled a lawsuit, agreeing to limit sales of its facial recognition database after allegations it acquired people’s photos without their consent. “Data” can also include other sensitive items like race, one’s location, even one’s religion.

Over a dozen U.S. states from Connecticut to California have enacted comprehensive privacy laws in recent years. A primary sponsor of the Maryland Online Data Privacy Act of 2024, state Sen. Dawn Gile, D-Anne Arundel, gave a reason why: “Congress has failed to act.”

Advertisement

The Maryland bill, in most cases (excepting the disclosure of a trade secret), gives an individual the right to know what data about themself is being collected. It allows an individual access to their personal information and provides a right to know of any third parties to whom that data has been disclosed. The bill, as drafted, also allows an individual to correct any inaccuracies in the data that is held, have that data deleted, and opt out of the sale or further use of that data.

As the legislation is considered in the Maryland Senate Finance Committee, more than a couple members are looking to pass the bill to provide privacy protections for the state’s residents instead of waiting on Washington, D.C., where Ellis says there is a case of “passing the buck.”

“We, as a state, we can and we should (take responsibility) until the national standards keep up,” said Ellis, pointing to the federal government’s inaction. “It will influence how these companies do business across the U.S.”

Advertisement

More: Gov. Moore takes action on artificial intelligence; here’s what’s in new executive order

Maryland Attorney General calls for more enforcement resources

Maryland Attorney General Anthony Brown, a former U.S. congressman, has seen this story with online data privacy legislation before. Not because bills have failed in recent years (they have), but because he introduced similar legislation over 20 years ago that ended up as law.

In 2001, about a decade into the commercialization of the internet, the first-term state delegate then representing Prince George’s County sponsored House Bill 14, which established a unit in the Office of the Attorney General to “protect the privacy of individuals’ personal information and to protect the public from unlawful conduct or practices in electronic transactions.” Between the two chambers, the bill passed with 184 legislators in favor and only one legislator against.

“We created a unit,” said Brown, of the 2001 Maryland law he backed, during a Feb. 28, 2024 phone interview, “but the Legislature never funded the unit.”

Advertisement

Over 20 years after his bill’s passage, Brown says the online landscape has “changed dramatically,” as he referenced several new technologies, including deepfakes, and called it a “much more complex landscape.”

“But the issues remain the same,” said the former state delegate, of data privacy. And the now-attorney general, starting his second year, is aiming to not repeat what happened from his tenure in the General Assembly.

“As my office is currently configured and staffed and equipped, I cannot enforce the provisions of the online data privacy (bill),” said Brown, calling for additional resources for the office, a refrain he has utilized dating back to the day he was sworn over a year ago in January.

He said new personnel forensic investigators, data analytics experts, mediators would be required to enforce a new law. “I need people who are experienced in this area,” Brown said. “Yeah, I’ll need a few lawyers, but I need a lot of non-lawyers to do the work as well.”

More: Anthony Brown sworn in as attorney general, brings big asks to Annapolis

Advertisement

Maryland bill, as introduced, received a B-, privacy groups say

Michele Gilman, a professor at the University of Baltimore School of Law, called the legislation substantively a “great bill,” but expressed disappointment in a lack of a “private right of action.”

“The advantage of a private right of action,” she said, “is it would allow people to vindicate their rights on their own with or without the support of the attorney general.”

During a Feb. 28 interview on the Senate floor, the bill’s primary sponsor, Gile, said the “main opposition” to the legislation was a private right of action, a provision not included in the bill as introduced. “That was kind of a balance that we ended up trying to strike this year,” she said, calling that specific opposition, including from companies, a “resounding chorus.”

Gile, an attorney, indicated her thought that there was “some merit” to concern raised by some about frivolous lawsuits.

According to the grades included in a “State of Privacy” report by a pair of privacy advocacy groups that ranked the 14 other states’ comprehensive privacy laws, the Maryland bill, as introduced without a private right of action, received a B-. California (the only state with a private right of action in law) received a B+ and was the only other state to receive a grade above a C+.

Advertisement

Gilman, who directs a law clinic representing low-income Marylanders at the University of Baltimore, indicated she and student attorneys would be able to bring cases to help enforce the statute, if there was a private right of action.

“The way it’s drafted now,” said Gilman, “we won’t be able to play that role.”

More: Maryland’s new Artificial Intelligence advisor starts as legislator calls for privacy law

Republican senator says he does not see bill as a ‘partisan issue.’

State Sen. Justin Ready, R-Carroll/Frederick, a member of the Finance Committee that heard testimony about the bill, said the Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division is “probably the appropriate place” for enforcement.

Advertisement

Ready, the minority whip, said he does not view the legislation as “a partisan issue.”

“We don’t want people’s data being sold and trafficked without their consent,” he said, during a Feb. 29 interview on the Senate floor.

Sometimes that “data,” like online shopping habits and search history, can be used for purposes that some people may prefer (i.e. targeted advertisements). The legislation applies to companies that collect over data of at least 35,000 consumers or at least 10,000 consumers, if the firm makes a fifth of its revenue from selling data. Ready called the legislation a “complex, big bill.”

“We live in an interconnected world, so figuring out where’s that line, where’s that balance,” he said, “we’re trying to find that.”

Advertisement

More: Russia called out for actions in Ukraine by Rep. Andy Harris, Maryland US senators

Privacy bills needs to pass both chambers to reach governor

Ellis, the bill sponsor who called the current data environment “almost like the Wild Wild West,” said Maryland has a lot of wealth in the state and puts a lot of money into the digital economy.

A 2023 report on the State of the Tech Workforce from the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA) supports that, showing over 14,000 tech firms with payroll in Maryland. The report indicated that the technology sector made up 8.9% of Maryland’s overall economy.

The United States Air Force veteran Ellis compared Maryland and the U.S. to Europe, where a data privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), went into effect in 2018.

Advertisement

 “The European Union does a much better job in holding firms accountable and responsible,” said Ellis, during a Feb. 28 interview on the ground floor of the nation’s oldest state capitol in continuous legislative use, “We’re still laissez-faire, anything goes in this country.”

The Senate Finance Committee is expected to vote on the measure this week, according to a bill sponsor. A companion bill in the House also had a committee hearing in February. Both bills need to pass in their respective chambers in order for the legislation to reach the governor’s desk.

More: Maryland bill seeks to streamline application process for items like licenses, permits

Dwight A. Weingarten is an investigative reporter, covering the Maryland State House and state issues. He can be reached at dweingarten@gannett.com or on Twitter at @DwightWeingart2.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Maryland

Maryland’s second-half collapse yields a loss to Indiana on senior day

Published

on

Maryland’s second-half collapse yields a loss to Indiana on senior day


An afternoon that began with a celebration of the Maryland men’s basketball team’s seniors ended in misery following a second-half collapse that led to an 83-78 loss to Indiana on Sunday.

In losing for the fourth time in five games, Maryland (15-15, 7-12 Big Ten) failed to protect a 16-point lead with less than 18 minutes to play. Uncharacteristically porous defense allowed the Hoosiers to storm back and move in front for good at 66-64 on Trey Galloway’s putback with 8:20 to play. The Terps’ deficit was as wide as 11 in the final minutes.

Although the Terps trimmed their margin to 77-72 on Jahmir Young’s three-pointer with 1:56 to play, Indiana (16-13, 8-10) settled the outcome by making four consecutive free throws down the stretch in front of a stunned Xfinity Center crowd.

The loss meant the Terps couldn’t send out Young, Donta Scott, Jahari Long and Jordan Geronimo with a win on senior day. “It sucks,” second-year coach Kevin Willard said.

Advertisement

The top scoring defense in the Big Ten let the Hoosiers shoot 73.1 percent as they racked up 50 points in the second half and 56.4 percent overall. Indiana came into the weekend averaging 72.9 points, which ranked them 12th out of 14 teams in the Big Ten.

Young led the Terps with 22 points to go with five rebounds and four assists in his final regular season home game with his hometown school. The Upper Marlboro native committed a costly turnover shortly after his late three-pointer, a poor pass that turned into a layup by Xavier Johnson and pushed the Hoosiers’ lead back to seven in the final minute.

Transition defense was spotty for Maryland, which yielded 20 fast-break points and struggled to slow Indiana freshman forward Mackenzie Mgbako. He scored a season-high 24 points and consistently beat Maryland defenders down the court.

“It comes down to who’s making shots and who’s getting stops,” Scott said. “I feel like we didn’t get enough stops in transition. [The coaches] really stressed they get out in transition, but they made shots, and we fell short of making shots at the end of the game.”

Hoyas’ 15-point lead over Xavier fades away in yet another loss

Advertisement

Scott went 4 for 10 from beyond the arc on his way to 15 points. Earlier this season, the fifth-year senior became the program’s all-time leader in games played. Junior forward Julian Reese added 13 points and 11 rebounds.

Sunday’s disheartening result has Maryland on track to play on the first day of the five-day Big Ten tournament as one of the conference’s bottom four finishers. With their aspirations of an at-large berth to the NCAA tournament extinguished, the Terps’ only path to a second straight bid is to win the Big Ten tournament, which tips off March 13 in Minneapolis. The Terps’ regular season finale is next Sunday at Penn State.

“Our turnovers didn’t put us in a position to get back fast enough,” Young said. “… They put an emphasis [on running] the floor. They get three guys up and try to get easy ones. That definitely hurt us in the second half.”

An NCAA policy change on NIL could have a major impact on recruiting

The Terps had claimed their largest lead, 51-35, on the strength of five quick points from Long and a three-point play by Young with 17:51 to play. Indiana responded with 16 of the next 20 points to flip the momentum.

Advertisement

Before the opening tip, Young, Scott, Long and Geronimo and their family members walked to midcourt for a ceremony that included Willard presenting each player with a framed jersey. The ovation was particularly robust for Young, the Terps’ scoring leader. He played at DeMatha and spent his first three college seasons at Charlotte before spending two years with the Terps.

“It’s only my second year here, so to have a special bond with two guys [Young and Scott] you’ve only been with for two years — Donta could have left; Jahmir could have left last year,” Willard said. “They both stuck around. They’ve put a lot into this program. … As a coach, I’m extremely appreciative of their effort, their hard work, their attitude — and they’re both terrific young men.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending