Connect with us

Georgia

Rice, longtime coach and Ga. Tech AD, dies at 97

Published

on

Rice, longtime coach and Ga. Tech AD, dies at 97


ATLANTA — Homer Rice, who as athletic director hired some of Georgia Tech’s most successful coaches and implemented the school’s Total Person Program, has died. He was 97.

Rice died Monday, according to the school.

Rice was Georgia Tech’s athletic director from 1980-97. Among his notable hires were basketball coach Bobby Cremins, football coaches Bobby Ross and George O’Leary and baseball coaches Jim Morris and Danny Hall. Georgia Tech won a share of the 1990 national football championship and its first Atlantic Coast Conference basketball championship in 1985 while advancing to the Final Four in 1990.

The Yellow Jackets won 16 ACC championships in five sports during Rice’s time leading the athletic department.

Advertisement

Rice was a high school, college and NFL football coach before beginning his career as an administrator. He coached the NFL’s Cincinnati Bengals in 1979-79 before beginning his time at Georgia Tech.

Rice was a college assistant at Kentucky (1962-65) and Oklahoma (1966) and was the coach at Cincinnati (1967-68) before leaving to serve six years as North Carolina’s athletic director. He was hired in 1976 as athletic director and football coach at Rice in Texas and held those positions for two years.

Rice’s Total Person Program is regarded as the model for the NCAA’s Life Skills Program. The Homer Rice Award is presented annually to a FBS athletic director in recognition for significant contributions to college athletics.

“Homer has reminded us throughout his career that the ultimate goal of intercollegiate athletics is to help student-athletes grow fully as people,” Georgia Tech president Ángel Cabrera said in a statement released by the school. “At a time of profound changes in athletics, Homer’s message and legacy of excellence is more important than ever.”

ACC commissioner Jim Phillips said in a statement Rice’s Total Person Program “was ahead of its time and paved the way for NCAA programming by preparing student-athletes for life beyond collegiate athletics. Each of the seven pillars of the Total Person program continue to resonate with not only myself, but every one of Dr. Rice’s peers, colleagues, and former student-athletes.”

Phillips said Rice, a native of Bellevue, Kentucky, “was incredibly influential in the development of student-athletes, not only at North Carolina and Georgia Tech, but throughout college athletics.”

Advertisement

Former ACC commissioner and UNC athletic director John Swofford said Rice, AD at UNC when he graduated in 1971, was his inspiration to pursue a career in athletic administration.

“He was my mentor then, and has been throughout my adult life,” Swofford said in a statement. “I had the privilege of serving for 17 years as an A.D. with him in the ACC while he was at Georgia Tech and I was at UNC. Simply put, he was the best Athletic Director that I ever observed during my half century in college sports. He was the best leader, the most organized, the best motivator, the best innovator. He was full of integrity, decency and class.”

Rice taught a leadership class at Georgia Tech until recent years and wrote a number of books on leadership success.

Georgia Tech dedicated a statue of Rice outside of Bobby Dodd Stadium in 2021. Dodd and John Heisman are the only other in Georgia Tech athletics to be commemorated with a statue.

Rice’s wife of 64 years, Phyllis, died in 2013. He married his second wife, Karen, in 2015.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Georgia

New law could help third party, independent presidential candidates get on the Georgia ballot

Published

on

New law could help third party, independent presidential candidates get on the Georgia ballot


Thanks to a new law, SB 189, it could be easier for third-party and independent presidential candidates to appear on Georgia ballots.

And since Georgia’s last presidential race was decided by less than 12,000 votes, the presence of those candidates could shape whether President Joe Biden or former President Donald Trump win in November.

On this week’s episode of WABE’s “Plugged In,” politics reporters Sam Gringlas and Rahul Bali discuss SB 189 and some of the candidates that could be joining Biden and Trump on the Georgia ballot.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Georgia

Georgia Tech coach Brent Key 'nothing I hate more' than Georgia football

Published

on

Georgia Tech coach Brent Key 'nothing I hate more' than Georgia football


Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets head coach Brent Key has brought Georgia Tech back to respectability. In 2023, the Yellow Jackets went 7-6 and won a bowl game for the first time since 2016, which was the last time that Georgia Tech defeated Georgia.

Key and Georgia Tech challenged Georgia in 2023. The Yellow Jackets lost 31-23 and were close to getting a chance to tie up the game.

“There’s nothing I hate more in the world,” said Key when asked about Georgia football at a recent alumni event. “It’s probably the only thing I actually hate. When I say hate, like, truly despise everything about it. I really do.”

Not only did Georgia Tech fall to Georgia on the field, but the Bulldogs also took a key member of Georgia Tech’s coaching staff this offseason. Key, who played college football for Georgia Tech, clearly has not gotten over Georgia’s eight-point win over the Yellow Jackets in Atlanta last year.

Advertisement

“Three minutes and 31 seconds with three timeouts left, we’re down by eight. Muff the onside kick, get (UGA) to third-and-3, they run a toss sweep out of the bunch formation to the boundary,” said Key. “(Georgia Tech linebacker) Kyle Efford is about two inches away from making the tackle.”

“I think about it every day,” continued Key. “(Efford) thinks about it every day. We talk about it every day.”

There’s no doubt that Georgia Tech has Black Friday circled on its calendar. The Yellow Jackets always have the goal of beating Georgia. Georgia Tech’s improvement does not mean much if the Yellow Jackets can’t conquer their biggest rival.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Georgia

21-year-old Georgia woman breaks fishing record that had been untouched for nearly half a century

Published

on

21-year-old Georgia woman breaks fishing record that had been untouched for nearly half a century


Sawfish spinning, dying off coast of Florida

Advertisement


Endangered sawfish spinning, dying off coast of Florida

04:07

Advertisement

A 21-year-old woman in Georgia just broke a nearly half-century-old fishing record. The Georgia Department of Natural Resources announced the new saltwater fish record on June 5. 

According to the department, St. Mary’s resident Lauren Harden caught a crevalle jack that weighed a whopping 33 pounds, 10.72 ounces. She caught the fish on May 24 on Cumberland Island, the largest and southernmost of the state’s barrier islands. According to Georgia Aquarium, crevalle jack are large, silvery fish that are often found in large schools in open water, usually over the continental shelf. 

“It is an important food fish and is also popular with sport fishermen because of its strength, speed and fighting spirit,” the Georgia Aquarium says. 

240605hardenjackcrevalle.jpg
Lauren Harden, 21, broke a nearly 50-year-old fishing record in Georgia in May 2024 after she managed to catch a more than 33-pound crevalle jack.

Georgia Department of Natural Resources

Advertisement


The fish Harden captured, however, was not even half the weight the animals can grow to. The aquarium says that the fish, which are known for their steep foreheads and tendency to “grunt or croak when caught by fishermen,” can reach up to 70 pounds. 

The previous record for catching the fish was set in 1981 by Ann Allen. Her fish weighed 30 pounds and 6 ounces. The current record for males is a 38-pound, 8-ounce crevalle jack that was caught by Lex Bazemore in August 2001. 

“We are excited to congratulate Ms. Harden on this extraordinary achievement,” said Tyler Jones, the public information officer for the Department of Natural Resources’ Coastal Resources Division. “Records like this inspire other anglers and showcase the diverse and thriving marine life in Georgia’s coastal waters.”

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending