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Delaware Valley Regional boys basketball can’t complete game of catch-up in H/W/S semis

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Delaware Valley Regional boys basketball can’t complete game of catch-up in H/W/S semis


Delaware Valley Regional’s boys basketball team was playing a game of catch-up all Saturday afternoon.

And the Terriers couldn’t complete the game before the final buzzer.

Second-seeded Delaware Valley conceded the opening basket and trailed the remainder of the way as third-seeded Hunterdon Central earned a 45-41 victory in the Hunterdon/Warren/Sussex semifinals at Wallkill Valley.

Hunterdon Central (15-7) advances to meet fifth-seeded Vernon, which upset top-seeded Phillipsburg, in the county final 5 p.m. Friday at Centenary University.

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“I don’t think we came out matching their energy and intensity from the start,” Terriers coach Mike DePaolo said. “They jump out to an [8-3] lead, and you could just tell they were playing with a little more fire underneath them than us … Every point matters in games like this. We did battle. We dug in, got stops and made plays. But ultimately, Central made a just a few more winning plays than we did.”

The Terriers (16-7) refused to go quietly.

Hunterdon Central senior Matthew Schwartz drilled a midcourt 3-pointer as the buzzer sounded to send his team into the fourth quarter with a 39-32 lead. Red Devils coach Tristen DeFazio was yelling, “No,” as Schwartz released the shot, because with 2 seconds on the clock, the senior had a chance to get closer to the basket. It didn’t matter.

“I was kind of in the moment,” Schwartz said. “… Sometimes miracles can happen, and I guess that’s what happened, I don’t know.”

Unfortunately, for the Red Devils, their 39-32 lead became a 38-32 advantage due to a discrepancy uncovered in the scorebook between quarters. The Terriers had Central with one fewer point in the third quarter, and since Del Val was providing the “official” book as the home team, the score was changed.

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Del Val senior Haze Puttlitz tallied the first four points of the fourth quarter to trim Central’s margin to 38-36 with 7:16 on the clock.

“We had to grind it out,” DeFazio said. “All week we talked about how this game was going to be a bloodbath. They were going to come back. They’re a great basketball team.”

Schwartz scored a layup in transition and junior Cameron Diogene finished a strong drive to the basket to put the Red Devils ahead 42-36 with 3:09 left.

Del Val senior Francis Denvir swished a 3-pointer to make it a one-possession contest, 42-39, with 2:20 to play. The Terriers got the ball back after an offensive foul by Central, but Denvir was off the mark with a 3 and the rebound went out of bounds off Del Val.

Diogene made a pair of free throws to give Central breathing room. Terriers junior Eric Klemmer trimmed the deficit to 44-41 on a bucket with 12.8 seconds remaining, but that’s as close as it got.

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Central got off to a fast start thanks to junior forward Weston Shirk, who scored 10 of the team’s first 18 points as the Red Devils opened an 18-11 lead.

“We go as he goes,” DeFazio said of Shirk. “We’ve said that all year. To quote the great Kelly Williams from TCNJ, there’s something about throwing it into your big man that just settles you down. When he gets us going early and he’s settling us down on the inside, everything else just opens up.”

Del Val adapted and limited Shirk to just two points in the second half.

“We weren’t in position to start. He was able to get position deep on us and flash to the ball,” DePaolo said. “When we went back to the board, just to show how he’s diving to the block and how they’re trying to run stuff for him, our guys made adjustments. Credit to them that they were able to get steals and limit his touches inside.”

Denvir, who entered averaging 18.9 points per game, paced the Terriers with 15 points. Puttlitz added 14.

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Schwartz had a game-high 18 points for Central. Shirk finished with 12.

Saturday marked the Terriers’ first loss to Hunterdon County opposition this winter. Del Val had previously beaten Voorhees (twice), North Hunterdon (twice) and South Hunterdon (in the H/W/S quarterfinals).

The next chance for tournament success for Del Val is the Central Group 2 bracket.

“Last time we got here was 2019,” DePaolo said. “… We just talked about not letting opportunities like this slip away. As we turn our attention to states, we just have to remind ourselves of that. It’s a brand-new season, everyone is 0-0. We’ve got to take advantage of the opportunity there.”

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Kyle Craig may be reached at kcraig@lehighvalleylive.com.



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Delaware

Delaware, New Jersey, Illinois lead multistate coalition supporting PA gun safety law – State of Delaware News

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Delaware, New Jersey, Illinois lead multistate coalition supporting PA gun safety law – State of Delaware News
















Delaware, New Jersey, Illinois lead multistate coalition supporting PA gun safety law – State of Delaware News
















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Navy blue background featuring the Delaware state seal in the center

Attorney General Kathy Jennings today co-led a coalition of 18 attorneys general filing an amicus brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit. The coalition urged the court to revisit an opinion striking down a Pennsylvania law prohibiting individuals under the age of 21 from carrying concealed weapons in public and imposing additional restrictions during declared states of emergency. Delaware, New Jersey, and Illinois were the lead states on the brief.

In the brief, AG Jennings asks the full court to review a recent opinion in Lara v. Commissioner of the Pennsylvania State Police, a lawsuit challenging a Pennsylvania law that restricts the issuance of concealed carry weapons permits to people ages 21 and up.

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“Some things are just a matter of common sense,” said AG Jennings. “Deep red and deep blue states alike have laws that govern concealed carry or other access to firearms for people under 21. The panel ruling in this case is inconsistent with more than a century of legal precedent and, if allowed to stand, will set back the states’ ability to curtail gun violence at a time when guns are the leading cause of death for children.”

The court’s opinion, if not corrected, will raise questions about the constitutionality of similar statutes in more than 30 other states with age restrictions on firearms access. The coalition explained in the brief that those statutes are constitutional because they are consistent with our country’s historical tradition because similar laws have existed for over 150 years. Jennings and the attorneys general argued that the opinion should be revisited because the court’s reasoning, if adopted elsewhere, could threaten the states’ ability to defend and enforce all manner of firearms regulations.

The brief is the most recent step in Attorney General Jennings’ work to address gun violence throughout Delaware and across the nation. Gun violence in Delaware has fallen by 20% since the pandemic, and violent crime has reached an all-time low, due in part to a variety of enforcement initiatives — including gang prosecutions, law enforcement intelligence sharing programs, gun trafficking indictments, new bail laws aimed at violent offenders, and a high conviction rate against gun offenders.

Jennings is an outspoken advocate for permit-to-purchase legislation, which is currently awaiting consideration in Delaware’s General Assembly. She has also supported gun safety laws that ban assault weapons and high capacity magazines, ban unserialized “ghost guns,” limit handgun access to adults over 21, and enable the State to hold gun dealers accountable for negligent business practices that enable gun violence.

Joining Jennings in filing the amicus brief are the attorneys general of California, Colorado, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

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Graphic that represents delaware news on a mobile phone

Keep up to date by receiving a daily digest email, around noon, of current news release posts from state agencies on news.delaware.gov.

Here you can subscribe to future news updates.

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Navy blue background featuring the Delaware state seal in the center

Attorney General Kathy Jennings today co-led a coalition of 18 attorneys general filing an amicus brief with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit. The coalition urged the court to revisit an opinion striking down a Pennsylvania law prohibiting individuals under the age of 21 from carrying concealed weapons in public and imposing additional restrictions during declared states of emergency. Delaware, New Jersey, and Illinois were the lead states on the brief.

In the brief, AG Jennings asks the full court to review a recent opinion in Lara v. Commissioner of the Pennsylvania State Police, a lawsuit challenging a Pennsylvania law that restricts the issuance of concealed carry weapons permits to people ages 21 and up.

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“Some things are just a matter of common sense,” said AG Jennings. “Deep red and deep blue states alike have laws that govern concealed carry or other access to firearms for people under 21. The panel ruling in this case is inconsistent with more than a century of legal precedent and, if allowed to stand, will set back the states’ ability to curtail gun violence at a time when guns are the leading cause of death for children.”

The court’s opinion, if not corrected, will raise questions about the constitutionality of similar statutes in more than 30 other states with age restrictions on firearms access. The coalition explained in the brief that those statutes are constitutional because they are consistent with our country’s historical tradition because similar laws have existed for over 150 years. Jennings and the attorneys general argued that the opinion should be revisited because the court’s reasoning, if adopted elsewhere, could threaten the states’ ability to defend and enforce all manner of firearms regulations.

The brief is the most recent step in Attorney General Jennings’ work to address gun violence throughout Delaware and across the nation. Gun violence in Delaware has fallen by 20% since the pandemic, and violent crime has reached an all-time low, due in part to a variety of enforcement initiatives — including gang prosecutions, law enforcement intelligence sharing programs, gun trafficking indictments, new bail laws aimed at violent offenders, and a high conviction rate against gun offenders.

Jennings is an outspoken advocate for permit-to-purchase legislation, which is currently awaiting consideration in Delaware’s General Assembly. She has also supported gun safety laws that ban assault weapons and high capacity magazines, ban unserialized “ghost guns,” limit handgun access to adults over 21, and enable the State to hold gun dealers accountable for negligent business practices that enable gun violence.

Joining Jennings in filing the amicus brief are the attorneys general of California, Colorado, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

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Graphic that represents delaware news on a mobile phone

Keep up to date by receiving a daily digest email, around noon, of current news release posts from state agencies on news.delaware.gov.

Here you can subscribe to future news updates.

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Current employees and retirees could see less generous state benefits

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Current employees and retirees could see less generous state benefits


From Philly and the Pa. suburbs to South Jersey and Delaware, what would you like WHYY News to cover? Let us know!

This story was supported by a statehouse coverage grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.


Delaware is considering sweeping changes to the health benefits for current and retired state employees to counter significant unfunded liabilities.

The Retiree Healthcare Benefits Advisory subcommittee, chaired by Lt. Gov. Bethany Hall-Long, presented final recommendations for future hires and including current retirees to the Legislative Joint Health Committee earlier this week. The State Employee Benefits Committee also met to consider options to soften the blow of a 27% premium rate hike for current state employees.

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The liability for Other Post-Employment Benefits, which are largely health benefits other than pensions, is $8.9 billion — of which $8.4 billion is unfunded. Officials said the net unfunded liability could grow to as much as $20.7 billion by 2042 if it’s not addressed.

The RHAS subcommittee was created in 2023 after an attempt by the state employee benefits committee to move 25,000 retirees to a Medicare Advantage Plan through Highmark Delaware. Some people who were upset by the planned change formed the advocacy group RiseDelaware and successfully sued the state to block the implementation.

Superior Court Judge Calvin Scott temporarily stayed the state’s decision in October 2022, saying, “This court cannot agree with the sentiment that the need for prior authorization for over 1,000 procedures and the use of only in-network doctors is the same level of benefits retirees obtained with the current policy.”

The subcommittee made several recommendations, including not utilizing a Medicare Advantage plan. It also proposed increasing OPEB pre-funding from 0.36% of payroll to 0.5%, then increasing it by an additional 0.25% of payroll each fiscal year until it reaches 10%. It also urged lawmakers to continue contributing 1% of the general fund from the prior year to the OPEB fund.

It also put forward changes to the length of service and the percentages paid by the state accordingly for Medicare-eligible retirees’ health care premiums hired on or after Jan. 1, 2025.

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Delaware Retiree Healthcare Benefits Advisory subcommittee Chair Lt. Gov. Bethany Hall-Long presents the committee’s recommendations to the Legislative Joint Health Committee. (Sarah Mueller/WHYY)

“I want Delaware to be the place people live, work, raise their families. And we want good state employees … because it’s our roads, it’s our schools. It’s our health system — every facet of daily life,” Hall-Long said. “Business is affected by how efficient our culture of excellence [is] in our status and our culture of excellence is only going to be as good as our employees. We need to make sure that we have the funding in place.”



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Taylor Swift inspired workshop at University of Delaware helping students learn data analytics

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Taylor Swift inspired workshop at University of Delaware helping students learn data analytics


Data Enchanted is the clever title of a University of Delaware workshop series on data analytics and, if it sounds intimidating, Assistant Economics Professor Dr. Kathryn Bender gets that.

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“The friendship bracelets. Yes!” she said. It is a favorite of Taylor Swift fans.

“You’re just sitting there putting a bead on a string and it also makes meeting new people and talking to people a little bit easier,” said Dr. Bender who came up with the theme.

Beyond a bedazzled doorway is where the magic of data happens.

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“Are you ready for your life to be changed?” said the professor to the students.

Zach Seymour is a data mentor.

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“We’re really there as auxiliaries to help along the students,” he said. Data mentors wear an introduction tee-shirt with a twist to the Taylor song Anti Hero. Seymour says what is happening here is important for entering the workforce.

MORE TAYLOR SWIFT HEADLINES:

“It just gives somebody a real understanding of what they learn in class that they don’t really get just through doing homework and exams,” he said.

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And the Taylor tie?

“Taylor Swift songs specifically data from Spotify. So looking at some variables we have made, like how playable it is for a car ride, time signature or length of the song,” said Seymour.

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Emma Aucker says she had never done data analysis.

“It’s not something just like raw data. It is like oh, it is her streaming data or something like that. So it is more approachable if you are new to things,” said Aucker. She is excited about learning to use the data analytics tool Stata.

“It’s a way to clean your data, organize your data and manage your data,” she said. The knowledge gained here is for everyone.

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However, Aucker does not want bad blood with super fans so she has a confession.

“I do not self-identify as a Swifty because I feel like that’s a little insulting to Swifties. I am very much a Taylor Swift appreciator but I do not think I have their level of commitment,” she laughed. The workshop is eight sessions and awards each student a certificate of completion.



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