Connect with us

Dallas, TX

FC Dallas vs Sporting KC: Lineup notes 📝

Published

on

FC Dallas vs Sporting KC: Lineup notes 📝


FC Dallas looks to advance to the semifinal round in the 2024 US Open Cup tonight as they take on Sporting Kansas City.

The winner will advance to host USL Championship side Indy Eleven at the end of August.

Both clubs have their lineups in, so let’s break them down.

Peter Luccin used a heavily rotated lineup on Sunday against SKC and has flipped back to what is going to be as close to a first-rate lineup as he can get right now.

Advertisement

In goal, Maarten Paes will once again be between the posts. The defensive group in front of him sees Sebastien Ibeagha return (after being out on Sunday for a yellow card accumulation suspension) next to Nkosi Tafari and Marco Farfan.

The midfield is drastically different from Sunday night. Asier Illarramendi and Sebastian Lletget start in the middle, with Bernard Kamungo and Paul Arriola on the wings.

Up top, Petar Musa gets the start with Tsiki Ntsabeleng and Logan Farrington behind him.

I think we’ll likely see Sam Junqua at some point. The same might be said for Nolan Norris, Eugene Ansah and Herbert Endeley.

Suspended: none
Out: Geovane Jesus (Right knee), Alan Velasco (Left knee), Paxton Pomykal (knee), Jesus Ferreira (hamstring), Patrickson Delgado (knee), Liam Fraser (upper leg)
Questionable: none
On Loan: Isaiah Parker
International Duty: none

Advertisement

That looks fairly like the first choice for SKC, as well.

📅 Date: Wednesday, July 10, 2024
⚽️ Kickoff: 8:00 PM
🏟 Venue: Children’s Mercy Park
📺 Streaming: MLS Season Pass
💬 Gameday Social: #FCDvSKC
☀️ Weather: 88, sunny

Join us on our Notes to discuss it.



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Dallas, TX

Despite red flags at Dallas County youth lockup, board looked the other way

Published

on

Despite red flags at Dallas County youth lockup, board looked the other way


The resignation of Dallas County’s embattled juvenile department director may finally force the Juvenile Board to reckon with shocking complaints about the treatment of youths in lockup.

A majority of the board appeared asleep at the wheel despite mounting allegations about teens being kept in their cells or in solitary confinement longer than appropriate.

Darryl Beatty resigned as executive director of the juvenile department after state regulators opened a second investigation into the juvenile detention center at the Henry Wade Juvenile Justice Center. State officials told us they went in for a surprise inspection this month following “[r]ecent reports, from various sources, alleging new instances of supervisory neglect.” The final report from a separate neglect investigation the state launched last summer is pending.

The Juvenile Board shouldn’t just wait for the results. The board clearly needs to conduct a broader review into the operations of the Dallas County Juvenile Department.

Advertisement

Opinion

Get smart opinions on the topics North Texans care about.

By law, it is the county’s Juvenile Board and not the Commissioners Court that oversees the juvenile department and its detention facilities. The Commissioners Court provides funding from its budget.

Yet the Juvenile Board so far has betrayed an astounding lack of curiosity about what’s going on in the county’s juvenile justice system.

Last year, the board pushed back against attempts by the Commissioners Court to obtain anonymized “observation sheets” that would show how long youths have been kept in their cells day to day, after a controversial third-party report found the Dallas County juvenile justice system is more punitive than those in other counties. A judge ruled that county commissioners were not entitled to the observation sheets.

Advertisement

Then came a state inquiry into allegations of neglect, soon after a June 2023 investigation by this newspaper highlighted concerns by multiple parents and staff whistleblowers who said children were being kept in their cells for up to 23 hours a day. Some of them also complained about unsanitary conditions in the cells and lack of access to medical care.

At the time, this newspaper reported a revealing exchange among members of the Juvenile Board about the isolation allegations. County Judge Clay Lewis Jenkins and Commissioner Andrew Sommerman — the two members of the Commissioners Court who sit in the Juvenile Board and who’ve requested access to observation sheets — were chastised by family court Judge Andrea Plumlee for using the term “isolation.” Another board member, Juvenile Judge Andrea Martin, said, “We don’t just put kids behind doors when they shouldn’t be.”

The Texas Juvenile Justice Department disagreed. While the agency has yet to issue a final report on its 2023 investigation, it said in September that some children in Dallas County detention were held in isolation for disciplinary reasons for as long as five days, which is more than double the state limit of 48 hours.

The state hasn’t yet said whether teens have routinely been kept in their cells most of the day for reasons other than safety or discipline.

TJJD told the Juvenile Board that there were record-keeping gaps at the Henry Wade facility, with staff at the detention center unable to produce some observation sheets. That alone should have set off alarm bells for board members.

Advertisement

The state approved the juvenile department’s improvement plan, but now the public has questions about what actual improvements took place. An investigation by WFAA-TV last month exposed complaints similar to those illuminated by The Dallas Morning News’ reporting a year ago. Dallas pastors rallied to demand better treatment for the youth in county lockups, though Beatty categorically denied allegations of mistreatment.

Then came the unannounced inspection last week and Beatty’s resignation. Beatty didn’t respond to a text message from us.

Commissioner John Wiley Price, who sat on the Juvenile Board until early 2023 and who defended Beatty from the Commissioners Court dais, said the right thing had happened with the Juvenile Board reporting allegations to state regulators and allowing the state investigations to play out. He noted that Beatty had dealt with high staff vacancy rates but acknowledged concerns with his performance. Price said Beatty had seemed paralyzed in the past six months and unable to move the juvenile department forward.

Juvenile Judge Cheryl Shannon, chair of the Juvenile Board, also rejected our criticism of the body’s handling of concerns about Beatty’s department.

“The media has chosen to present the Board as taking no action regarding the concerns raised about the Dallas County Juvenile Detention Center,” she wrote in an email. “This assertion is absolutely incorrect. Since the inception of concerns raised in early 2023, the majority of the Board agreed that the proper independent investigative authority is the Texas Juvenile Justice Department (TJJD).”

Advertisement

She said the board agreed that TJJD has the expertise required to investigate the detention center and that the process has worked “exactly as it is designed to work.”

That explanation rings hollow to us. The Juvenile Board is not powerless to investigate, and the abundance and severity of the complaints should have sparked an internal review. The state law that created the Juvenile Board plainly authorizes it to “make any special studies or investigations it considers necessary to improve the operations” of the juvenile department and county institutions under its jurisdiction.

Managing a juvenile department is a difficult and delicate task. Many minors in lockup are there because they have been accused of violence. Some of them also struggle with mental illness. Juvenile detention centers must balance safety with the need to offer schooling and recreational activities to youths in their custody.

No system run by human beings is perfect. But the difficulty of the job is no excuse to overlook so many red flags. The message from the Juvenile Board and the juvenile department all along has been, in essence, “nothing to see here.”

We await the report from the first state investigation into neglect allegations, which TJJD spokeswoman Barbara Kessler said is under legal review. An executive summary is expected in August.

Advertisement

Kessler said investigators spent months gathering evidence, conducting interviews and reviewing about 18,000 daily observation sheets. They put together a report that’s nearly 100 pages.

Nothing to see here, Juvenile Board?

    Residents can help shape the future of North Texas mobility
    A July cool spell hits Dallas, and it’s like the lottery

We welcome your thoughts in a letter to the editor. See the guidelines and submit your letter here. If you have problems with the form, you can submit via email at letters@dallasnews.com



Source link

Continue Reading

Dallas, TX

Micah Parsons predicts these Cowboys players will have breakout years

Published

on

Micah Parsons predicts these Cowboys players will have breakout years


Tomorrow the Dallas Cowboys will hold their first training camp practice of the year at Oxnard. As usual, there is no shortage of intrigue and drama around the star as the team embarks on the 2024 NFL season.

At the moment the biggest headlines are regarding the contracts of the three most-important players on the team. The Cowboys’ top priority is apparently negotiating a new deal for superstar wide receiver CeeDee Lamb, who is holding out of training camp. Then there’s franchise quarterback Dak Prescott, whose cap hit is over $55 million this year.

Finally there’s pass rusher MIcah Parsons, who still has two years left on his rookie deal but will eventually sign a contract making him the highest-paid defender in the league and the sooner they get on that, the better.

To some extent having to pay all three of them is a good problem for the Dallas front office to have. However, a top-heavy roster can only get you so far – as this team has discovered the hard way three years in a row with early playoff exits. To get to the next level, the Cowboys need more role players to step up and do their part.

Advertisement

For what it’s worth, Parsons thinks that’s exactly what’s going to happen. He’s predicting a lot of breakout years in 2024, per Todd Archer at ESPN.

“The mindset I have is we have seven All-Pros or however the count may be. It might be more, it might be less, we got at least three guys I know can be All-Pro. I think a lot of guys are going to have breakout years. I think that plays into it too. When you talk about all these guys, it just leads to saying, ‘Hey, when are the other guys going to step up and be better for the team?”

The greatest needs the Cowboys have right now are these: they could use somebody other than Lamb and Brandin Cooks to step up at wide receiver, they desperately need rookie left tackle Tyler Guyton to hit the ground running, someone has to step up and replace Johnathan Hankins and now would be a great time to find any hidden stars at running back.

That’s a lot of needs at this point in the NFL’s calendar year, but the team has been somewhat slow on the draw to address them. Expect team owner Jerry Jones to be put to the fire when he has his usual pre-training camp press conference on Saturday.

— Enjoy More Cowboys News from Cowboys on SI —

Camp News: 5 stories to watch when Dallas Cowboys open training camp

Advertisement

Feeling the Frustration:Stephen Jones gets why fans are upset. Does it matter? 

Cowgirls: Meet Kelcey Wetterberg: Dallas Cowboys Cheerleader

Cowgirls: Meet Sophy Laufer: Star of Dallas Cowboys Cheerleader Netflix doc

Making A Name: Which Dallas Cowboys running back will breakout in 2024?



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Dallas, TX

By the Numbers: How FC Dallas looks after 25 games

Published

on

By the Numbers: How FC Dallas looks after 25 games


It has been a busy few weeks for FC Dallas since we last looked at the season stats. FC Dallas has played six more games since we’ve been able to dive into some key stats fully. During that stretch, the club went 3-2-1 and got themselves within two points of a playoff spot.

Because of the six-game difference, we’ll see plenty of large jumps in the stats, but some have stood out during this time.

FC Dallas is averaging around two goals per game since Peter Luccin took over in early June. That is a drastic change in the one goal a game under Nico Estevez.

A big reason for that is that Petar Musa is scoring goals like crazy these days, with 13 on the season. If he can continue this pace when the league resumes play in late August, he has a shot at breaking the club’s all-time season mark (18 set by Kenny Cooper and Jesus Ferreira).

Advertisement

It may not be the biggest spike after six games, but total xG isn’t the best stat to get worked up over in soccer anyway. FC Dallas is third from the bottom in MLS, with Austin and New England sitting below them (a decent distance between them, though).



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending