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Texas Tech women’s basketball offensive turnaround not enough vs. Texas: 3 takeaways

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Texas Tech women’s basketball offensive turnaround not enough vs. Texas: 3 takeaways


Texas Tech women’s basketball had an offensive turnaround but couldn’t convert that into a win against rival Texas. The Longhorns won the 112th meeting in the series, 77-72, Wednesday at the Moody Center in Austin.

UT swept the regular-season series after getting a 74-47 victory Jan. 3 in Lubbock. There are no scheduled meetings going forward as the Longhorns prepare to move to the SEC.

SERIES HIGHLIGHTS: Top 5 games against Texas for Texas Tech women’s basketball fans

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The Lady Raiders return to action Saturday at home against Cincinnati, which lost 95-87 to Oklahoma on Tuesday.

Texas Tech nearly matches total vs. Baylor in first half

Sparked by a 3-point onslaught, the Lady Raiders scored almost as many points in the first half Wednesday as they did in their previous game. Baylor throttled Tech 61-32 on Sunday, and Tech had 31 points at halftime against UT.

The Lady Raiders began 6 of 12 from beyond the arc and surpassed their season average of makes (6.3) before the break. Tech ended 12 of 25 (48.0%). It entered shooting 31.3% from deep.

The Lady Raiders snapped a streak of five games failing to reach 30 points in the first half.

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For the game, Tech had its highest-scoring output since a 71-65 win over TCU on Jan. 27.

Bailey Maupin, Jasmine Shavers bounce back as well

Maupin scored 12 points in the first half, nearly matching her total from the past two games (15). She had nine points against Baylor and reached double-figure scoring once in the previous five contests.

Maupin finished with 22 points, the second-most she’s scored since a 19-point game Dec. 30 at Houston. She tallied 24 points against UCF on Feb. 10. Wednesday was her fourth 20-plus point game of the season.

Although not as long of a rough patch, Jasmine Shavers managed five points on 2 of 14 shooting Sunday. She notched a team-high 27 points against UT, including 17 in the second half.

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Jada Wynn, who returned Sunday after missing three games with a concussion, finished with 10 points. She was part of the early 3-point barrage and shot 3 of 4 from deep for the game.

Texas Tech losing skid continues

The Lady Raiders have lost six games in a row. They’ve played the past five without Elina Arike and the past three without Jordyn Merritt.

Tech’s worst skid last season was four games. The year before the Lady Raiders had a seven-game losing streak.

Cincinnati will look for the season sweep Saturday after downing Tech 74-56 at home Feb. 3.



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Austin, TX

Texas Longhorns’ Kadin Shedrick Makes Decision for Next Season

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Texas Longhorns’ Kadin Shedrick Makes Decision for Next Season


AUSTIN — The Texas Longhorns are in desperate need of a roster additions, but coach Rodney Terry secured his first significant pledge of the offseason on Saturday.

Per reports from CBS college basketball insider Jon Rothstein, Texas forward Kadin Shedrick will return to the Longhorns next season to use his additional year of eligibility. Shedrick transferred in from Virginia last offseason and played a key frontcourt role for Texas, but battled injury issues throughout the season.

He wrapped up his first season in Austin with a career-high 7.7 points, 3.0 rebounds and 1.1 blocks. With Texas’ All-Big 12 First-Team forward Dylan Disu missing the first nine games of the season, Shedrick had to carry a significant load and impressed, even scoring a season-best 27 points against Louisville at Madison Square Garden in November. Once conference play came around, he received fewer minutes but still flashed solid shot-blocking impact and low-block scoring ability.

The Longhorn have already lost Disu, Max Abmas, Brock Cunningham and Ithiel Horton to eligibility while reserve pieces Gavin Perryman, Alex Anamekwe and Chris Johnson have all transferred. Dillon Mitchell and Tyrese Hunter have still yet to make an announcement on their decision for next season.

Texas will remain active in the portal, but for now, the team can find comfort in knowing that a reliable big like Shedrick is here to stay for another season.



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Austin, TX

Clinical Psychologist Austin Johnson Expands Executive Coaching Nationwide

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Clinical Psychologist Austin Johnson Expands Executive Coaching Nationwide


Austin Johnson, Ph.D., a seasoned clinical psychologist, is leading a nationwide expansion of his coaching practice, transforming the landscape of corporate well-being.

 Austin Johnson, Ph.D., a seasoned clinical psychologist, is leading a nationwide expansion of his coaching practice, transforming the landscape of corporate well-being. Through his brainchild, Executive Counseling, Johnson blends psychological expertise with insights from cultural anthropology to redefine how people approach leadership and work-life stability. 

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Johnson has helped clients from multi-million dollar companies, entrepreneurs, small businesses, and Fortune 500 companies. “The beauty of online coaching is that it allows me to connect with clients no matter where they are,” Johnson explains. “I’m excited to bring my approach to executives in every corner of the nation.

A Refreshing Approach to Executive Coaching

Traditional management consulting firms have long dominated the corporate industry, but Johnson’s approach stands out. “I focus on helping my clients enjoy their work more,” he explains. “Unlike a business coach whose job is to help you make more money, my job is to help you find fulfillment and stability in your professional life.

This philosophy is rooted in Johnson’s interdisciplinary background, which allows him to approach coaching and consulting from a fresh perspective. By focusing on work-life stability and bridging empathy gaps, he helps his clients navigate leadership better. 

Johnson’s clients have experienced transformative growth both personally and professionally. Eugene T., a client, credits Johnson with helping to identify and embrace fresh prospects for growth and leadership.

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The fact that I can access his guidance from anywhere has been a game-changer for me and my business,” says Eugene T. “Dr. Johnson has helped me recognize growth and leadership opportunities that I didn’t even realize existed. He’s helped me improve my ability to communicate my value and to pursue projects that have led to monetization and recognition as a thought leader.

Addressing the Cultural Underpinnings of Workplace Issues

One key factor that sets Johnson apart is his focus on addressing the cultural roots of workplace issues, particularly burnout. With burnout affecting C-suite executives at a higher rate than middle management or front-line employees, Johnson emphasizes improving job satisfaction by providing high-level support for teams and peer-level support for leaders.

To accomplish these goals, Johnson applies psychological principles, cultural anthropology concepts, and existential psychotherapy to help clients and readers rethink old paradigms. He shares these freely through his newsletter. “By making these resources available online, I’m able to reach a wider audience and help more people than ever before,” Johnson says.

Johnson also highlights the importance of modulating energy between work and personal life in creative yet practical ways. In a recent collaboration with author and men’s fashion expert Jeff Lack, the two explored ways that something as simple as dressing more intentionally to the occasion at hand, be it work or home, can help achieve a greater balance in the long run. 

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Lack and Johnson agreed that dressing for the occasion will make people feel more mentally connected. “Your work will suffer if you are still in your PJs trying to work at midday or don’t change when you get home or for family or meal time. Clean, fresh, appropriate clothing will set you in the scene, even if adjusting out of your head takes some time,” Lack explains. 

The Future of Executive Coaching

The potential for a shift in the executive coaching industry is imminent. “Austin Johnson’s approach is unique,” says an anonymous industry expert. “While it remains to be seen how his methods will translate on a larger scale, there’s no denying that he’s tapping into a growing desire for more empathetic coaching practices.

Reflecting on his mission, he shares, “If I can help people find joy and meaning in their work, I know I’m making a difference. Expanding my online coaching services makes me one step closer to achieving that goal.”

Johnson is poised to make an even greater impact by expanding his online coaching services. As more executives experience the power of his holistic, culturally-informed approach, people will likely see a positive difference in how they think about leadership and success. 

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Contact Info:
Name: Austin Johnson
Email: Send Email
Organization: Executive Counseling, LLC
Website: https://www.executivecounseling.org/

Source: Baden Bower

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Austin, TX

Texas' diversity, equity and inclusion ban has led to more than 100 job cuts at state universities

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Texas' diversity, equity and inclusion ban has led to more than 100 job cuts at state universities


AUSTIN, Texas — A ban on diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives in higher education has led to more than 100 job cuts across university campuses in Texas, a hit echoed or anticipated in numerous other states where lawmakers are rolling out similar policies during an important election year.

Universities throughout Texas rushed to make changes after Republican Gov. Greg Abbott signed the law last year. On April 2, the president of the 52,000-student University of Texas at Austin — one of the largest college campuses in the U.S. — sent an email saying the school was shuttering the Division of Campus and Community Engagement and eliminating jobs in order to comply with the ban, which went into effect on Jan. 1.

More than 60 University of Texas at Austin staff members were terminated as a result of the law, according to the Texas Conference of the American Association of University Professors. The group said it compiled the list based on affected employees who had reached out and that the number could be greater. University officials declined to confirm the number of positions eliminated.

Officials at other schools, in response to inquiries from The Associated Press, indicated that a total of 36 positions were eliminated between Texas A&M University in College Station; Texas Tech University in Lubbock; Texas State University in San Marcos; The University of Houston; Sam Houston State University in Huntsville; and Sul Ross State University in Alpine. Officials said no one was let go; people were assigned to new jobs, some resigned and vacant positions were closed.

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Earlier this week, University of Texas at Dallas officials announced that approximately 20 associate jobs would be eliminated in compliance with the law. University officials declined to comment on how many of those positions are currently filled.

Texas House of Representatives Speaker Dade Phelan, a Republican, applauded the University of Texas actions in a post on the social media platform X. “It is a victory for common sense and proof that the Legislature’s actions are working,” Phelan wrote.

Texas is among five states that have recently passed legislation targeting DEI programs. At least 20 others are considering it.

Florida was the first to implement a ban, last year, with the vocal backing of then-Republican presidential candidate Gov. Ron DeSantis, who often derides DEI and similar diversity efforts as “woke” policies of the left. In response to the law, the University of Florida last month announced more than a dozen terminations.

Universities of Wisconsin regents reached a deal with Republican lawmakers in December to limit DEI positions at the system’s two dozen campuses in exchange for getting funds for staff raises and construction projects. The deal imposed a hiring freeze on diversity positions through 2026, and shifted more than 40 diversity-related positions to focus on “student success.”

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Republican legislators who oppose DEI programs say they are discriminatory and promote left-wing ideology. Some are counting on the issue to resonate with voters during this election year. Democratic DEI supporters say the programs are necessary to ensure that institutions meet the needs of increasingly diverse student populations. Lawmakers from the party have filed about two dozen bills in 11 states that would require or promote DEI initiatives.

Texas’ anti-DEI law, which Abbott enthusiastically signed last year, prohibits training and activities conducted “in reference to race, color, ethnicity, gender identity, or sexual orientation.” Additionally, the law, also known by its legislative title, SB17, forbids staff members from making hiring decisions that are influenced by race, sex, color or ethnicity, and prohibits promoting “differential” or “preferential” treatment or “special” benefits for people based on these categories.

SB17 states that the ban doesn’t apply to academic course instruction and scholarly research. That’s why professor Aquasia Shaw was so surprised to hear last week that her supervisor was not going to renew her contract. Shaw said she was not given a reason for the termination, but considering the timing, she suspects it’s the new law.

Shaw taught courses on the intersection of sociology, sports and cultural studies in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Education at the University of Texas at Austin. Her faculty page on the university’s website states her focus as “sociology of sport and cultural studies, sport management and diversity, inclusion and social justice.” A course she taught this semester was titled Race and Sports in African American Life. But she said she had not been involved in any DEI initiatives outside of her teaching.

“I was under the impression that teaching and research was protected so … I am trying to grapple with the idea and in denial that this can’t be the reason I was targeted,” she said.

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In March, Republican state Sen. Brandon Creighton, who authored SB17, sent a letter to public university boards of regents across the state, inviting them to testify in May about the changes that have been made to achieve compliance. He included a warning that renaming programs, rather than changing their intent, would not be sufficient.

Creighton’s office did not respond to an emailed request for comment.

The law’s impact was felt in Texas even before it went into effect. In anticipation, University of Texas at Austin officials last year changed the school’s Division of Diversity and Community Engagement to the Division of Campus and Community Engagement. The name change didn’t save it — it was closed this month. School officials said some of the division’s projects would be relocated, while others would be shut down. They did not provide specifics.

Shaw said she was the only person of color in her department. She said she saw on X that other university employees had been let go and began connecting with them. At least 10 of the other terminated faculty and staff members whom she contacted are also from minority groups, she said.

The loss of her job was a big blow to Shaw, who had already scheduled classes for this summer and fall. She said her superiors had previously told her they hoped to renew her contract.

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“I am so disheartened to see that exactly what I was concerned about ended up happening anyway,” Shaw said.



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