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‘Run to Remember’ 5K honors those who gave the ultimate sacrifice

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‘Run to Remember’ 5K honors those who gave the ultimate sacrifice


AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) – Dozens of runners hit the trails on Monday in honor of the fallen in the Wear Blue Run to Remember 5k.

Each runner was assigned a veteran’s name so they could run in their honor.

Mahalia Marin is a veteran but also a part of the Student Veterans of America Association at Augusta University

“I’ve been deployed three times, I’m back here. There are many people who didn’t make it back. And we’re just here representing them. And so we speak their names, so we don’t forget,” said Marin.

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Coming home isn’t something everyone gets to do. So, on Memorial Day, they run in their honor and think about how each person paid the ultimate sacrifice.

“I actually just retired this past year. But this was one of my soldiers in Washington, one of my soldiers in San Antonio and also Germany. And the last soldier I was stationed with at Fort Stewart we deployed together to Iraq and got killed over there,” said Jamie Graham, a veteran.

During the run, 133 posters could be seen along the sidelines with names and photos of fallen members since 9/11 who served in the CSRA, once lived in the area, or were friends and family members of locals.

“I lost my father in active duty Army when I was six. He was deployed in Iraq in 2010. So it’s, it’s been very rough. But starting this organization at Augusta University has really helped to not only educate the community on what Goldstar families are but to also bring in local, other Goldstar families who go to Augusta University,” said Caitlyn Burner, founder and President of Augusta Goldstar Foundation.

Burner came to honor her dad. Burner’s boyfriend and his family also ran in her dad’s honor.

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“When I was running through it, I just used it as a point to just kind of go as hard as I can because we wouldn’t be here without any without their service. So I just use that as motivation just to do my best,” said Stephen Webster, Burner’s boyfriend.

They’re showing support for those you know and even those you don’t while remembering what this holiday is truly about.

“It’s pretty cool that people, people really do care. And they’re out here showing it and they’re running for fallen soldiers who they don’t even know,” said Burner.

For more information on Goldstar families and how to support them, click here.

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Augusta, GA

Augusta commission approves moving forward with review of city charter

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Augusta commission approves moving forward with review of city charter


AUGUSTA, Ga. (WJBF) – The consolidation bill is what Augusta government has followed since the 1990s, but the document could be in for an overhaul. 

“People want to see some change in this government and see in this community,” said Commissioner Sean Frantom. “I think this is a great step towards that and it’s going to happen.”

Commissioners giving the go-ahead to bring in experts from UGA to create a charter review commission, to study the charter and decide if it needs updating.  

“The question whether the charter needs to be changed is not a yes or no for me, it’s a let’s look at this charter see what needs to be changed let’s review it properly,” said Commissioner Jordan Johnson.  

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“I don’t know how my colleagues feel. I would like to change about everything that can be changed in it,” said Commissioner Catherine Smith McKnight.  

“I think it’s time a document that’s been around for a long time, so we need to look to see what we need to change,” said Commissioner Francine Scott. 

Right now, commissioners have the hiring and firing powers for department directors Frantom would like to change the charter to turn that authority over to a city manager. 

“When you look at how this government has ran in the last 28 years, it’s not been efficient. I think there will be the nay-sayers that we shouldn’t be a city manager form of government that’s the only form of government it should be,” said Frantom.  

The consolidation bill is the form of government Augusta has followed for years, but now city leaders are ready to decide if it should remain that way. 

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Augusta, GA

Oregon alum Wyndham Clark named to Olympic golf team

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Oregon alum Wyndham Clark named to Olympic golf team


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PORTLAND, Ore. (Portland Tribune) — Former Oregon golfer Wyndham Clark was named to the USA golf team roster ahead of the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris, the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee announced Tuesday.

While Olympians and Oregon have gone hand-in-hand historically, Clark becomes the first in the school’s 151-year history to earn their Olympic rings as a golfer.

Clark, currently ranked the No. 5 men’s golfer in the world, is joined by World No. 1 Scottie Scheffler, No. 3 Xander Schauffele, and No. 7 Collin Morikawa. Schauffele and Morikawa both represented the USA in the 2020 Tokyo Games, while Scheffler and Clark will both be making their debuts. 

Clark competed for Oregon in 2016 and 2017 after transferring to the university from Oklahoma State after three years. As a Duck, Clark was named All-Pac-12 First Team, Pac-12 Player of the Year, a 2017 Division I Jack Nicklaus National Player of the Year semifinalist and a 2017 Ben Hogan Award Finalist.

Clark finished third on the 2023 PGA Tour, winning the U.S. Open for his first ever major win. Since then, he’s added a win in the 2024 Pebble Beach Pro-Am as well as runner-up finishes in the Players Championship. 

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Read more at Portlandtribune.com

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Augusta, GA

George Perkins Sr., an architect of Augusta’s westward residential growth, dies at 95

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George Perkins Sr., an architect of Augusta’s westward residential growth, dies at 95


George E. Perkins Sr., the architect-builder whose construction of hundreds of west Augusta homes helped shape the city’s postwar growth toward suburban Columbia County, has died at 95.

Perkins died June 15. His wife of 75 years, the former Joyce Banks, died less than three months before.

If Perkins’ name doesn’t sound familiar, the names of his many development projects should. Neighborhoods such as Waverly and Monclair became parts of the city of Augusta through Perkins’ and his partners’ design and construction.

He estimated in his career to have built some 800 homes and offices.

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An Augusta native, Perkins grew up on Jenkins Street in Harrisburg, the son of barber O.W. Perkins and Beulah “Pat” Perkins, an interior decorator.

He began working for the Augusta architectural firm Eve and Stulb in January 1950, just weeks after two of his life’s milestones: graduating from Georgia Tech with an architecture degree and marrying his wife.

But it was his acceptance of a junior partnership in The Bailey Co. homebuilding and development firm in 1955 that would chart his professional trajectory. At the time, Bailey was developing Westwick, a neighborhood of several dozen homes off Walton Way near where it meets Aumond Road.

It’s a gift: Augusta Exchange Club awards $100K in grants to area nonprofits

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A September 1955 ad in The Augusta Chronicle advertised one of Westwick’s three-bedroom, two-bath homes for $18,750. A randomly selected house in the same neighborhood in 2024 showed an appraised value of more than $500,000.

In 1957, The Bailey Co. split, separating the building component of the organization into Perkins Construction Co.

The two companies spent the late 1950s and early 1960s erecting neighborhood after neighborhood of affordable homes from west of Aumond Road to the Richmond County line, pushing Augusta’s westward expansion to its literal limit.

Some subdivision names are seldom uttered today, such as Sheffield Place and Brynwood. Others are still with us, including Waverly and the ambitiously conceived Montclair, a 500-home development that took 11 years to complete. He also built adjoining subdivisions Crofton and, after creating the George Perkins Co. in 1973, Sugar Mill Woods.

A 5-acre tract Perkins bought in 1975 became the 25-building Professional Village in Martinez a decade later.

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Retirement did little to slow Perkins down. A backyard garden with flowers and vegetables became a water-featured showpiece that he maintained for years.

“I see many of my neighbors walking for exercise,” Perkins quipped to The Chronicle in 1999. “For me, gardening keeps me flexible, and flexibility is important for my golf game.” By age 40 he had gotten so hooked on golf that it squeezed out another of his hobbies, hunting.

Nothing, however, stood in the way of the devoted family man’s good works. Perkins’ stewardship at First Baptist Church and Warren Church was exemplary, connecting with teens through Bible studies and backpacking trips. He helped found Augusta’s chapter of Habitat for Humanity, designing and helping supervise the construction of its first house.

His proud membership in the Exchange Club of Augusta, for which he was a past president, lasted 67 years.

Perkins’ memorial service was held Tuesday in Storey Chapel at First Baptist Church, with Dr. Will Dyer officiating. Interment was in the church’s Cremation Garden.

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Memorial contributions can be made to First Baptist Church of Augusta, 3500 Walton Way Ext., Augusta, GA 30909; or to The Exchange Club of Augusta Charity Fund, P.O. Box 3884, Augusta, GA 30914-3884.



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