Connect with us

Arkansas

Four people rescued after boats capsize in Arkansas River below Pueblo City Park

Published

on

Four people rescued after boats capsize in Arkansas River below Pueblo City Park


Four people were rescued by the Pueblo Fire Department after their boats capsized in the Arkansas River just below City Park on Saturday.

The fire department was called to the scene by a bystander, according to department spokesperson Tim Trujillo, and launched a rescue raft and swift water rescue team, recovering all four individuals safely.

All four people were adults and all were wearing life jackets, Trujillo said. High water flows caused their inflatable boats to capsize.

Trujillo stated that the public is asked to avoid that area of the river for the next several weeks due to dangerous water conditions.

Advertisement

Colorado Parks and Wildlife has also urged the public to avoid the Arkansas River below the Lake Pueblo State Park Dam because of dangerous conditions.

Recent spring runoff and heavy rain have caused river currents in the area to fluctuate dramatically, causing dangerous water surges.

The city of Pueblo on Friday also temporarily closed a section of the Arkansas River trail below City Park due to “increased water flow and high water.” The trail closure ranges from Carlile Avenue to north past Reservoir Drive.

“We want to inform the public of the closure,” Steven Meier, director of Pueblo Parks and Recreation, said in a news release, “as well as remind everyone that this is the time of year that the river is flowing high and to always be cautious.”

Advertisement

More local news: What to expect from Pueblo gas prices as Colorado adopts reformulated gasoline

Questions, comments, or story tips? Contact Justin at jreutterma@gannett.com. Follow him on X, formerly known as Twitter, @jayreutter1. Support local news, subscribe to the Pueblo Chieftain at subscribe.chieftain.com.



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Arkansas

Petition drive Saturday in Magnolia seeks voter support for Arkansas constitutional amendments and acts

Published

on

Petition drive Saturday in Magnolia seeks voter support for Arkansas constitutional amendments and acts


























Petition drive Saturday in Magnolia seeks voter support for Arkansas constitutional amendments and acts | Local News | magnoliareporter.com

We recognize you are attempting to access this website from a country belonging to the European Economic Area (EEA) including the EU which
enforces the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and therefore access cannot be granted at this time.

Advertisement

For any issues, contact news@magnoliareporter.com.



Source link

Continue Reading

Arkansas

LSU Lawsuit Raises Question About Arkansas Coaches

Published

on

LSU Lawsuit Raises Question About Arkansas Coaches


FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. – The lawsuit filed by Les Miles against LSU over wins vacated as a result of NCAA violations from back during his run as Tigers’ head coach has brought forth rather interesting realizations.

The first is that there are coaches out there to whom the College Football Hall of Fame matters enough to spend money on lawyers while simultaneously dragging their names back through the mud for the outside shot they’ll get voted in. The second is how simple the criteria for getting considered happens to be and what a low bar it is.

To qualify, coaches must have a .600 average winning percentage and serve as head coach in at least 100 games. Basically, if someone can make it through each of his regular seasons going 6-6 in the regular season and win the bowl game against a Group of Five school over while possibly extending that regular season record to seven wins a few times, that mark can easily be hit during the eighth season.

So, with the bar so low, the question becomes whether any Arkansas coaches meet the standard during the modern era. Modern is a loose definition, so let’s say all schools are fully integrated with their football programs, conference television rights are a thing, and spread formations have found their way into the game.

Advertisement
Arkansas coach Ken Hatfield on the field prior to facing the Miami Hurricanes at the Orange Bowl.

Arkansas Razorbacks head coach Ken Hatfield on the field prior to facing the Miami Hurricanes at the Orange Bowl. / RVR Photos-USA TODAY Sports

The most natural marking point in Razorbacks history takes place right after the departure of Lou Holtz. His successor, Ken Hatfield, faced Andre Ware and the famed run and shoot offense that once hung 95 points on SMU and coached games that appeared on Raycom, the Southwest Conference’s version of Jefferson Pilot.

Hatfield looked like a shoe-in for the Hall of Fame when he left Arkansas after winning over 75% of his games. He was headed for Clemson, which had recently won a national championship.

He won 70% of his games with the Tigers after being tasked to clean up the NCAA sanctions mess left behind by Danny Ford. Yet, the fans there were unwilling to support him, so he left in 1993 still highly qualified for the honor.

Afterward, he sentenced himself to time at Rice where coaching careers go to die. At first he was such a good coach that being the second fiddle college in Houston wasn’t enough to hurt him.

In an odd twist worthy of a spot in the College Football Hall of Fame itself, Hatfield won the championship in an Arkansas-less SWC despite a 5-6 overall record. Unfortunately, his Owls weren’t eligible to accept the bowl bid that typically comes with being a major conference champion because of the losing record.

Advertisement

After a pair of 7-4 seasons in 1996 and 1997, his overall record was134-84-4, well above the .600 mark. Unfortunately, Hatfield stuck around another eight seasons, only one of which featured a winning record, taking him out of Hall of Fame eligibility.

NOT ELIGIBLE

Arkansas fans might be surprised to know Jack Crowe, perhaps the biggest blemish on the Frank Broyles record on the college football side of things other than being why Hatfield left, finished his career with nearly the exact same winning percentage as Hatfield.

He finished 3-8 in his first season after Broyles talked him out of going to Clemson with Hatfield. The following year was his best at 6-6, which was good enough for runner-up in the SWC.

Then came the breaking point. He opened his third season with a shocking loss to Division I-AA Citadel in the Hogs’ debut as a member of the SEC. Crowe was 14-20 at that point, dating back to his days as head coach at Livingston.

Advertisement

Eight years later he got a third chance a head coach at Jacksonville State. It looked like more of the same as he began 14-18 in his first three seasons, but the Gamecocks stuck with him through a move to the Ohio Valley Conference.

It paid off big time as he went 73-39, including an upset of Houston Nutt’s Ole Miss Rebels in Vaught-Hemingway Stadium in 2010.

NOT ELIGIBLE

Had Ford stuck around at Arkansas much longer, he would have possibly knocked himself out of eligibility. Fortunately, he built a huge winning percentage while racking up infractions at Clemson.

He went 26-30-1 with Hogs despite bringing the Hogs their first SEC West championship on the strength of Madre Hill’s legs. It was Ford’s players Houston Nutt would use to put Arkansas legitimately in national championship contention for the first and only time in the modern era.

Advertisement

In 2017 he became a member of the College Football Hall of Fame as the youngest coach ever to win a national championship at age 33, but no one will ever think of him as an Arkansas Razorbacks coach when they look back on the success that landed him there.

ALREADY IN

Houston Nutt is by far the most successful Razorbacks coach of the SEC era. He came a Clint Stoerner stumble while running out the clock against No. 1 Tennessee on the road from potentially competing for the first ever BCS national championship and went to six consecutive bowl games back when that truly meant something.

Overall, he went to eight bowl games, including a Citrus, two Cottons and a Capital One while also winning the SEC West twice. He also is the only coach besides Bobby Petrino to have double-digit wins in the SEC era.

He likely would have been a shoe-in for the College Football Hall of Fame off his 75-48 record at Arkansas alone had he not stuck around at Ole Miss afterward for one season too long. In the two seasons after dealing with pushy parents and Broyles forcing him to hire Gus Malzahn against his wishes nudged him toward Oxford, where he led the Rebels to back-to-back Top 20 finishes and a pair of 9-4 records.

Advertisement

However, things began falling apart in 2010. Ole Miss dropped to 4-8, which would have been the perfect time to exit as key relationships within the Rebels community began to fray.

Had he bailed at that point, Nutt would have been a perfect .600 and easily a nominee after 18 years as a head coach. Unfortunately, his time at Arkansas taught him a rebound is always around the corner after following a 4-7 season in Fayetteville with 10 wins.

It didn’t materialize though as he went 2-10 before being unceremoniously fired and inexplicably never given another opportunity to head a team despite only being 53.

NOT ELIGIBLE

Bobby Petrino is the only coach at Arkansas to win 11 games in the SEC era. He’s also the only coach to have multiple double-digit wins and a Top 5 finish since the Hogs moved to the SEC.

Advertisement

That alone should be enough to land him in the College Football Hall of Fame even though a picture of him in a neck brace following a motorcycle accident will remain his most iconic image. Whether it was Arkansas, Louisville, Western Kentucky or Missouri State, he finished his time at each school with a winning record.

He has since opted for the offensive coordinator route, a job that in the SEC pays more than a lot of head coaching opportunities without a lot of the headaches and the potential of ruining his College Football Hall of Fame eligibility. So long as he keeps following that route, his .659 winning percentage will stay intact.

PRIME CANDIDATE

While Bielema’s tenure is remembered as a bit of a turbulent mess bookended by losing seasons and featuring massive letdowns and an embarrassing scene where a player stole from a department store despite being there to get bowl game gifts, Bielema put together just enough winning seasons to still have an outside shot of qualifying.

It took a Hunter Henry heave miracle against Ole Miss celebrated on April 25 each year since to do it, but Bielema went 7-6, 8-5 and 7-6 from 2014-16 before being fired so Arkansas could hire Chad Morris following a 4-8 season.

Advertisement

At the time, that was considered an unacceptable level of football following nearly a decade of high level success. After spending years doing the least possible to make sure the Razorbacks had to continue paying his buyout, he finally landed at Illinois where he has since gone 18-19.

Bielema currently sits at a .599 winning percentage, which puts him below required line. Too many years at Arkansas and Illinois have since wiped out the wins at Wisconsin.

Whether he would be nominated should he get the required amount of wins is questionable. He is better known for his footwear, creating an environment that not even Sam Pittman would stomach as his assistant, and making the high school coaches of Texas furious, than his prowess as a head coach.

Even his success at Wisconsin is attributed more to the guidance of Barry Alvarez than Bielema’s genius. He is the only Badgers coach to lose consecutive Rose Bowl games, including a shocking loss to Mountain West champions TCU in 2011.

NOT ELIGIBLE

Advertisement

These two coaches are grouped together because they come from the darkest period of Arkansas history in the modern era outside of Crowe’s tenure. Morris quite literally ran the program into the ground with an average of two wins per season as the meat in a four-year stretch of Razorbacks history that culminated in 11 wins.

Part of those 11 wins over four years includes the beginning of a losing tenure under Pittman. While he put together a pair of winning seasons in his second and third years, things have been on a downward trend since a victory in the Capital One Bowl over Penn State capped a 9-win season in Year 2.

Pittman currently has a 23-25 record and is the only coach in the modern era to be given a fourth season at Arkansas with a losing record. An unexpected huge turnaround this year could help him eventually get to enough seasons and wins to go in as a head coach, but right now the odds are stacked against him.

NOT ELIGIBLE

Despite eight coaches being given a shot to lead the Razorbacks as official head coaches, only one looks as if he will earn the chance to be considered for the College Football Hall of Fame and be viewed somewhat as a Razorback. While his tenure at Louisville might overshadow what Petrino with the Hogs, the iconic neck brace photo and Top 5 finish with the Hogs just prior to his time being unexpectedly shortened at Arkansas may be enough for people to think of him as a Razorback should it happen.

Advertisement

HOGS FEED:

• Razorbacks lose first key piece of offseason

• SEC mascot quiz: With Texas, Oklahoma added, do you know the names of all the league’s mascots?

• Whether Pittman rips or praises his team could be clue of what to expect

• Subscribe and follow us on YouTube
• Follow allHOGS on X and Facebook

Advertisement





Source link

Continue Reading

Arkansas

Arkansas tax cut proposals sail through committees on first day of special session • Arkansas Advocate

Published

on

Arkansas tax cut proposals sail through committees on first day of special session • Arkansas Advocate


Two committees of Arkansas lawmakers approved measures to decrease income taxes and increase the homestead tax credit on Monday, the first day of the Legislature’s second special session in nine months.

Both the House and Senate Revenue and Tax committees passed, with no dissent, identical bills that seek to cut the top corporate income tax rate from 4.8% to 4.3% and the top individual income tax rate from 4.4% to 3.9%, retroactive to Jan. 1 of this year.

These cuts would reduce the state’s general revenue by a cumulative $483.5 million in fiscal year 2025, which begins July 1, and by $322.2 million each fiscal year afterward, according to the state Department of Finance and Administration’s fiscal impact report on Senate Bill 1 and House Bill 1001.

The committees also passed Senate Bill 3 and House Bill 1002, which propose increasing the homestead property tax credit from $425 to $500. Lawmakers previously increased the tax credit from $375 to $425 during the 2023 legislative session.

Advertisement

Both SB1 and HB1001 have emergency clauses, meaning they would go into effect immediately upon Gov. Sarah Huckabee Sanders’ signature. If they become law, corporate income tax rates will have decreased by 2.8% and individual income tax rates by 1% since April of last year.

The Arkansas special session tax cuts explained

In April 2023, state lawmakers approved more than $100 million in cuts to the top individual and corporate tax rates. During September’s special session, legislators lowered the top individual and top corporate income tax rates from 4.7% to 4.4% and from 5.1% to 4.8%, respectively. They also created a one-time, non-refundable $150 tax credit for those earning up to about $90,000.

The tax cut bills will require $290 million in general revenue to be set aside in a reserve fund on July 2 in case the money is needed to make up for the decrease in state general revenue due to the tax cuts.

No one spoke for or against the homestead tax credit increase before either committee, and the Senate committee passed the proposal with no debate.

Advertisement

The credit is available to property owners on the property that is their primary residence, reducing their real property tax liability, which is paid at the county level.

The homestead bills propose that on or before Jan. 30 of each year, the state’s chief fiscal officer will report the balance of the Property Tax Relief Trust Fund, whether the fund could support an increase of the homestead property tax credit, and if so, how much of an increase the fund could support.

The trust fund had $255.6 million in it at the end of the 2023 calendar year, Paul Gehring, the finance department’s assistant commissioner of revenue policy and legal, told the House committee Monday.

GET THE MORNING HEADLINES DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX

Advertisement

Tax cut discussion

Advertisement

Democratic lawmakers have criticized the proposed income tax cuts for primarily affecting wealthy Arkansans. Republicans, who hold supermajorities in both chambers of the Legislature, have said the cuts will keep money in the pockets of working people.

Nicholas Horton, founder and CEO of the conservative group Opportunity Arkansas, spoke in favor of the tax cuts before the House committee. Horton said the government “takes more than it needs,” echoing Rep. Les Eaves, R-Searcy, the House sponsor of both bills.

“Arkansas can’t continue to see $700, $800, $900 million surpluses and not think that we’re over-collecting from our citizens,” Eaves said.

Sen. Tyler Dees, R-Siloam Springs, said he hoped lower taxes would give people more resources to band together during disasters, such as the tornadoes that swept through his Northwest Arkansas district in May.

High death rates, unchanging poverty level puts Arkansas among worst states for child well-being

Advertisement

“What I’ve seen in the last three weeks is the speed of the private industries and individual citizens to give directly to those impacted instantly,” Dees said. “…I believe the best impact that we can have for those in need is to give dollars back to individual citizens so they can give back to their community.”

Keesa Smith-Brantley, executive director of Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, said private entities do help people in difficult times, but not uniformly throughout the state, leaving some regions “severely neglected.”

Smith-Brantley spoke against the tax cut bills before both committees. She referenced the latest KIDS COUNT Data Book, released earlier this month, which shows that most areas of child well-being in Arkansas have been getting worse.

Arkansas’ position at 45th in overall child well-being is down two slots from its ranking the last two years, and the state has ranked as one of the country’s 10 worst states for overall child well-being nine times in the last decade.

Cutting taxes reduces the state’s ability to fund initiatives that would improve child well-being, such as early childhood education and health care for pregnant and postpartum Arkansans, Smith-Brantley said.

Advertisement

In response to questions from senators, Smith-Brantley noted that some state agencies that serve children and families have received stagnant or less funding over time in the state budget. The Division of Youth Services within the Department of Human Services received a 0.01% funding increase in the state budget that passed during this year’s fiscal session, but “that amount of funding doesn’t actually keep up with inflation,” she said.

“I know that you care about the children of our state and you want them to thrive, and to do so, some of the critical areas in our state need investment,” she told the Senate committee.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending