Connect with us

Alabama

University of Alabama says campus is ready for GOP presidential debate

Published

on

University of Alabama says campus is ready for GOP presidential debate


The University of Alabama says a great deal of preparation has taken place before hosting the state’s first-ever Republican presidential primary debate on Wednesday.

Chad Tindol, UA’s chief administration officer, on Monday discussed preparations for the debate and the impact the event will have on campus, which will also wrap up fall classes this week.

“It’s a great honor to be hosting the (GOP debate) here at the University of Alabama,” Tindol said during a news conference.

More: How to watch Tuscaloosa Republican presidential debate: Start time, channel, moderators

Advertisement

“As a public institution, we don’t take positions on candidates, we don’t take positions on public controversies and issues, but what we do at our best is to serve as a forum for those types of events,” he said.

The debate will begin at 7 p.m. in UA’s Frank Moody Music Building, 810 Second Ave. This will mark the GOP’s fourth debate among candidates seeking the party’s nomination in the 2024 presidential race. Previous debates were held in Wisconsin, California and Florida.

The hosts for the Tuscaloosa debate will be the Republican National Committee and the NewsNation Network. Megyn Kelly of Sirius XM, Elizabeth Vargas of NewsNation, and Eliana Johnson, editor-in-chief of the Washington Free Beacon, will moderate the debate.

Tindoll said a lot of logistical planning has gone into preparation for the debate since this event marks the first time UA has hosted a presidential debate. But he pointed out that UA has had plenty of experience in the past hosting big events, such as Alabama football games.

Advertisement

“This is a new event for us. We’ve certainly hosted presidents, vice presidents and Supreme Court justices but we’ve never had a debate,” Tindoll said.

Tindoll said thousands of UA employees have assisted with the debate planning, including UA’s facilities, parking, logistics and security teams.

Due to the size, about 1,000-seat capacity, of the Frank N. Moody Music Building’s Concert Hall all seating was by invitation only. However, Tindoll said some of those invitations have been reserved for UA students.

Tindoll said Second Avenue will be closed for the debate and will likely reopen on Thursday.

Advertisement

UA is also hosting the Super 7 Alabama High School Athletic Association football championships this week, with the 7A title game between Thompson and Central of Phenix City kicking off at the same time as the GOP debate. The game will be held at Bryant-Denny Stadium, about a mile from the Moody Music Building. 

The Super 7 playoff games continue through Friday.

Tindoll also pointed out that UA is preparing for fall graduation on Dec. 16. UA expects to award nearly 1,800 degrees.

Fall classes end Friday at UA and exam week begins Dec. 11.

Reach Jasmine Hollie at JHollie@gannett.com.

Advertisement



Source link

Alabama

Alabama man jailed in ‘the freezer’ died of homicide due to hypothermia, records show

Published

on

Alabama man jailed in ‘the freezer’ died of homicide due to hypothermia, records show


An Alabama inmate with “serious mental and psychiatric needs” was placed in a concrete drunk tank known as “the freezer” before he later died from hypothermia in a death now ruled a homicide, state records show.

Anthony Don Mitchell died Jan. 26, 2023, while in the custody of the Walker County Sheriff’s Department after “spending fourteen days incarcerated under horrendous conditions” at the Walker County Jail, according to an amended complaint filed in a lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Alabama.

The jail is in the city of Jasper about 40 miles northwest of Birmingham.

According to the 53-page suit filed by his mother, Margaret Mitchell, corrections officers at the jail purposely exposed her 33-year-old son to freezing temperatures in the tank over a 24-period.

Advertisement

The suit, filed last February, also” claims they denied Mitchell medication, medical treatment and access to water or a toilet.

Mitchell’s death certificate, obtained by USA TODAY, shows he died as a result of hypothermia as well as “sepsis resulting from infections injuries obtained during incarceration and medical neglect.”

On Monday, Walker County Coroner Joey Vick told USA TODAY Mitchell’s death has been ruled a homicide.

“Tony’s death was wrongful, the result of horrific, malicious abuse and mountains of deliberate indifference, “Jon Goldfarb, an attorney representing Mitchell’s family, wrote in the suit.

Advertisement

As of Monday, no criminal charges had been filed against any off the defendants, Goldfarb told USA TODAY.

Sheriff, officers and nurses named defendants

The suit names defendants including Walker County Sheriff Nick Smith, jail Administrator Justin White, more than a dozen jail correction officers, a nurse practitioner, a nurse and an investigator.

Randy McNeill, an attorney representing the sheriff and the corrections officers told USA TODAY he could not comment on the case “because of the ongoing investigation.”

Attorneys for the remaining defendants could not immediately be reached, but according to a motion filed in response to the compliant, the sheriff’s office and its affiliated parties deny the allegations.

“The defendants do not think they did anything wrong,” Goldfarb told USA TODAY Monday via email.

Advertisement

Flight death: American Airlines passenger dies after medical emergency on Charlotte-bound flight

‘Portals to heaven and portals to hell’

According to the lawsuit, Mitchell lived “in complete isolation’ and suffered from “serious medical and psychiatric needs including but not limited to severe drug addiction, psychosis, and malnourishment.”

At the time of his death, Mitchell was being held at the jail after being arrested during a welfare check, when shots were fired at deputies as they were called to Mitchell’s home for what family members believed to be “a mental break down.”

On the day he was taken to jail, a cousin called 911 for help, the suit continues, because Mitchell was in serious need of psychiatric help, “spouting delusions about portals to heaven and portals to hell.”

When deputies arrived at the home, the suit reads, Mitchell brandished a handgun, fired one shot towards officers then fled into nearby woods.

Advertisement

A black spray painted face

When deputies found Mitchell in the woods, his face was covered with a black substance, the suit continues.

When he arrived at the jail, Mitchell’s cousin noticed his face and asked corrections Officer Arthur Armstrong, one of the defendants named in the suit, what happened.

Armstrong, the suit says, told the cousin Mitchell spray painted his own face black “because he was planning to enter a portal to hell located inside his house.”

Armstrong told Mitchell’s cousin they would set Mitchell’s bail “high enough that he would not be able to bond out,” and assured him Mitchell would receive medical evaluation and treatment in jail, the lawsuit reads.

Advertisement

“Armstrong told him, ‘We’re going to detox him and then we’ll see how much of his brain is left,’ or words to that effect,” the lawsuit reads.

Golf-cart bride death: Driver accused of killing bride in golf cart crash on wedding day is now free on bond

‘The freezer’

For the duration of his stay at the jail, Mitchell was kept in cell BK5, the “drunk tank,” according to the suit, either mostly or completely naked on a bare concrete floor.

According to the amended complaint, during the night of Jan. 25 to Jan. 26, “corrections officers intentionally caused extremely cold air to blow through the roof vents” in to his cell using the jail’s climate control system.

The outside temperature that night was in the low 30s, the suit claims, so if “it was simply outside air blowing into the cells, that air was frigid,” the attorney wrote.

Advertisement

“BK5, referred to by some longtime corrections staff and inmates as “the freezer” because of the ability of corrections staff to subject inmates to frigid temperatures there, would have been the coldest cell in the booking area, the suite reads. “Inmates housed there report being able to see their breath because it was so cold and that their digits would turn numb.”

At various points during a check, two corrections officers are captured on video “clowning and laughing as Tony lies motionless and naked on the bare cement floor in the open cell behind them, obviously in severe medical distress and in need of immediate emergency medical treatment.”

Deputies, the complaint continues, “did not call an ambulance for him despite his obvious need for emergency medical treatment.”

Amusement park melee: 15-year-old shot outside Six Flags by police after gunfire exchange, Georgia officials say

Advertisement

72 degrees Fahrenheit

When Mitchell was taken to a hospital in the backseat of a sheriff’s vehicle, his internal body temperature “was at most 72 degrees Fahrenheit when he arrived, according to the suit.

The emergency room doctor who treated Mitchell, and spent more than three hours trying to resuscitate him, wrote the following note in Mitchell’s medical records:

“I am not sure what circumstances the patient was held in incarceration, but it is difficult to understand a rectal temperature of 72°F… while someone is incarcerated in jail. The cause of his hypothermia is not clear…I do believe that hypothermia was the ultimate cause of his death.”

Natalie Neysa Alund is a senior reporter for USA TODAY. Reach her at nalund@usatoday.com and follow her on X @nataliealund.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Alabama

Alabama Security Trained To Stop Court Storming: VIDEO

Published

on

Alabama Security Trained To Stop Court Storming: VIDEO


Alabama is apparently willing to go to great lengths to stop court storming.

The Crimson Tide lost to Tennessee over the weekend in what was a major SEC conference game. Going into the matchup, there was speculation about whether or not Alabama students would storm the court if the team successfully knocked off the fourth-ranked Volunteers.

Advertisement

It didn’t happen because Tennessee controlled and beat the Tide, but what would have occurred if Alabama had one? Turns out security was training like they were Navy SEALs or Army Rangers about to do a hit.

The SEC Network shared absolutely hilarious footage of security training to quickly get on the court and get a rope up to prevent a court storming.

Watch the awesome video below, and let me know your reactions at David.Hookstead@outkick.com.

I love every single thing about this video. The government should have called these guys to get bin Laden instead of SEAL Team 6. Look at the energy, passion, commitment to the job, speed and intensity.

Advertisement

Are these people security guards making probably $10 an hour or Army Rangers getting ready to roll a target? Practice makes perfect, and Alabama legit had security getting in reps to stop court storming.

I hate court storming. It’s a loser mentality and it shouldn’t be promoted. You’re just telling the world you don’t expect to win whenever you do it.

However, having security train to stop it is beyond dumb. What’s going to happen if students just go under the rope? Is security going to start tossing tear gas onto the court? Flash-bangs?

Again, court storming shouldn’t be promoted because this is America and we don’t tolerate loser mentalities in this country. However, the idea that security is going to very literally hold the line against thousands of students is hilarious.

Advertisement

It reminds me of when that Ole Miss security guard JACKED UP a female fan who ran onto the field during a storming.

Speed, surprise and violence of action. The three core pillars for any direct action unit……and security at Alabama basketball games. It’s too bad Alabama got beat because I need to know what would have happened like I need air in my lungs. Let me know what you think about this absurdity at David.Hookstead@Outkick.com.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Alabama

No. 13 Alabama Women’s Tennis Downs Kentucky 6-1 – University of Alabama Athletics

Published

on

No. 13 Alabama Women’s Tennis Downs Kentucky 6-1 – University of Alabama Athletics


TUSCALOOSA, Ala. – The No. 13 Alabama women’s tennis team defeated the Kentucky Wildcats, 6-1, at the Alabama Tennis Stadium Sunday, improving the Crimson Tide to 11-1 on the season.

Alabama (11-1, 2-0 SEC) won back-to-back doubles matches for the opening point against Kentucky (6-5, 0-2 SEC). The Crimson Tide’s Ola Pitak and Klara Milicevic defeated Zoe Hammond and Ellie Myers, 6-2, on court three. UA secured the doubles point after Anne Marie Hiser and Loudmilla Bencheikh defeated Lidia Gonzalez and Ellie Eades, 6-2, on court one.

Anne Marie Hiser defeated Kentucky’s Ellie Eades (6-0, 6-2) at the No. 3 spot in straight sets to give UA a two-point lead. Alabama would surrender a point to Kentucky before claiming the next four matches to collect a 6-1 win over the Wildcats. Petra Sedlackova downed Lidia Gonzalez in a straight-set victory (6-3, 6-2) at the No. 2 spot, while Loudmilla Bencheikh clinched the victory for the Tide, on court one, with a hard-fought straight-set victory, defeating Lizzy Stevens (7-5, 7-6 (7-4)).

Ola Pitak would give UA its fifth point, defeating Zoe Hammond in a third-set tiebreaker (6-7, 7-5, 10-7). Alabama’s Anna Parkhomenko concluded action with a victory over Kentucky’s Ellie Myers (3-6, 6-2, 6-3).

Advertisement

“We started out very slow, in singles, but I liked the fact that the girls showed resiliency. We lost a couple of first sets and came back and won the second and third set. Ola (Pitak) did a great job and Anna (Parkhomenko) did a good job after losing the first set, just showing hard work, and gutting the match out in three sets. So, I’m very proud of them.”

Up Next

  • Alabama will take on Arkansas, Friday, March 8, at the Alabama Tennis Stadium with match-play scheduled to begin at 5 p.m. CT

Results

Doubles competition:

  1. No. 37 Anne Marie Hiser/Loudmilla Bencheikh (UA) def. Lidia Gonzalez and Ellie Eades (UK) 6-2
  2. Anna Parkhomenko/Petra Sedlackova (UA) vs. No. 43 Makayla Mills/Lizzy Stevens (UK) 3-4, unfinished
  3. Ola Pitak/Klara Milicevic (UA) def. Zoe Hammond/Ellie Myers (UK) 6-2

Order of Finish (3,1)

Singles competition

  1. No. 31 Loudmilla Bencheikh (UA) def. Lizzy Stevens (UK) 7-5, 7-6 (7-4)
  2. No. 79 Petra Sedlackova (UA) def. Lidia Gonzalez (UK) 6-3, 6-1
  3. Anne Marie Hiser (UA) def. Ellie Eades (UK) 6-0, 6-2
  4. Ola Pitak (UA) def. Zoe Hammond (UK) 6-7, 7-5, 10-7
  5. Julia Zhu (UK) def. Klara Milicevic (UA) 6-3, 6-2
  6. Anna Parkhomenko (UA) def. Ellie Myers (UK) 3-6, 6-2, 6-3

Order of Finish (3,5,2,1,4,6)

Get all the latest information on the team by following AlabamaWTN on X, Instagram, and Facebook. General athletic news can be found at UA_Athletics on X and Instagram and AlabamaAthletics on Facebook.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending