Connect with us

Vermont

St. Albans city leaders discuss solutions to repeat crimes

Published

on

St. Albans city leaders discuss solutions to repeat crimes


ST. ALBANS, Vt. (WCAX) – Officials in the city of St. Albans are putting out a call to all residents who have noticed a string of crimes happening in the community.

“We had a situation here. Somebody broke in and took all the money out of the register. That was a lot for me because you know that was like a vulnerable thing for me. Like hey, somebody is in my place,” said business owner of Hangry The Donut Bar Erica McClain.

McClain has owned a business and lived in St. Albans, off and on, for the past ten years.

Recently, she’s noticed what she calls a slow uptick of crime on Main St. and in the neighborhood. She says she believes many of the people committing the crimes have struggles of their own, people just need to be more careful.

Advertisement

“I mean you got to lock your doors, you can’t have your cars open or your home doors unlocked just because, just in general you know, when people wanna do something bad, they are going to do it,” McClain said.

For the past several months, city officials report an unusual amount of low level crimes, like attempted burglaries, car break-ins, and house break-ins, on a weekly basis.

According to the police, the crimes are being committed by the same group of individuals. Sometimes five retail thefts a day, by the same person. Police bumped up their patrols on Main St., but now the crimes have ventured out into the surrounding community. City Manager Dominic Cloud says, the people committing the crimes are suffering with substance use disorder.

“In St. Albans there’s half a dozen folks who are struggling with addiction. They are fueling their addiction, robbing from the community. What’s missing there is that accountability mechanism that forces someone to get their life together,” Cloud explained.

City of St. Albans Police Chief Maurice Lamothe says the department could receive as many as 25 calls a week related to these misdemeanor crimes. But because the crimes only require a citation to go to court. Sometimes with no arrest, holding repeat offenders accountable is tough.

Advertisement

“The courts hands are somewhat tied. In the state statute, because you can only ask so much bail. Bail is designed so that the state meaning the court believes that you are a risk of flight and not to come to court. That’s when they can set bail. For these people that are repeat offenders in our area. They are not any flight of risk. They may not go to court, but they are not going to flee the area,” Lamothe said.

The city will hold a public safety forum, on June 17, at City Hall.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Vermont

Police identify man killed and trooper who pulled trigger in officer-involved shooting

Published

on

Police identify man killed and trooper who pulled trigger in officer-involved shooting


ORANGE, Vt. (WCAX) – Police have released the name of the man killed and the identity of the trooper who pulled the trigger in Wednesday’s officer-involved shooting in Orange.

Vermont State Police identified the man who was shot and killed as Jason Lowry, 41, and the trooper who fired the gun as Adam Roaldi, a five-year veteran of the state police.

Vermont State Police Trooper Adam Roaldi is seen in this official portrait taken at VSP Headquarters in Waterbury.(VERMONT STATE POLICE | Courtesy: Vt. State Police)

Police also provided new information about the welfare check the trooper was responding to before the shooting happened.

Police say Roaldi went to 87 Spencer Street at the request of a local family services agency in a matter related to a minor. They say after dealing with that, the trooper noticed Lowry who appeared to be unconscious in a car in the driveway. They say the trooper thought Lowry might be overdosing and called for an ambulance.

Advertisement

After waking him up and ordering him out of the car, police say there was a struggle over a sawed-off shotgun. That’s when police say the trooper fired his service weapon several times, hitting Lowry in the neck and torso, killing him.

Police say the incident was caught on body camera video.

Once the state police investigation is complete, it will be turned over to the attorney general’s office and the county prosecutor for independent investigations into the use of force.

Trooper Roaldi has been placed on paid relief from duty.

Police say they later learned Lowry had an active arrest warrant for fentanyl trafficking and they found drug items in the car.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Vermont

Sen. Peter Welch discusses the one-year anniversary of the flooding

Published

on

Sen. Peter Welch discusses the one-year anniversary of the flooding


A new report from the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee finds that flooding could cost the U.S. between $180 and $496 billion dollars annually in losses. Sen. Peter Welch cites that economic burden as one of the main reasons why he’s fighting for additional flood recovering and resiliency funding.

Welch joined Vermont Edition host Mikaela Lefrak to discuss the one year anniversary of the summer 2023 flooding, former President Donald Trump’s recent convictions, nonprofit theater funding and more

This segment of the conversation on flood resiliency has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Let’s start our conversation around flood resiliency, as the one year anniversary of the summer 2023 flooding is right around the corner. You are a member of the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee. Just this week, it shared a new report that shows that flooding could cause as much as $496 billion in losses each year in the United States. That is a massive number. Where did those losses come from?

Advertisement

We had our huge flood [in Vermont] just a year ago. Today, Florida is underwater in many, many places. What’s really, really tough is that this is going to keep flooding. And what we’re seeing in Vermont, of course, is the awareness that we have to build back in a more resilient fashion. So this is absolutely a product of climate change, and it just is a reminder of the urgency of addressing that issue.

In this report, it noted some of the the sources of those losses — the need for infrastructure upgrades for resiliency, commercial impacts, decreased tax revenue and more. I’m sure you’ve witnessed many of these here in Vermont in the past year. Can you tell us a little bit more about what you’ve seen on the ground?

The flood was a year ago and [we] immediately found, in the flood, it was all hands on deck, and neighbors helped neighbors dig out the mud and muck. Towns reacted and people did their best to get back on their feet. But now, a year later, I just recently went to Barre, I went to Johnson, I went to Hardwick. If it was your farm, if it was your business, if it was your home, you’re still suffering. And FEMA is tremendous in the immediate aftermath. They come in en force and really provide immediate emergency assistance. But a year down the road, there’s infrastructure problems — like in Johnson with their pump station, [or] like in Hardwick, where public resources were demolished along the bike path.

And this is where it gets tough with FEMA. Because at this point, you need folks who have flexibility, and you need FEMA officials who can make quick decisions, and also the money that is necessary. The best money is the one that goes through the disaster relief program through the CBDG program. But the bottom line is, it’s flexible. And you’ve got to have local leadership. So that’s what I’m working on with my colleagues, particularly [Sen.] Brian Schatz from Hawaii. And of course, they suffered that terrible fire around the time we had our terrible flood.

So that is going to be something that I think we’ve got to get to Vermont — the flexible funds in these towns that are going to help the farmers, that are going to help the town officials deal with infrastructure, and hopefully homeowners who are either going to get a buyout or hopefully get back in their home.

Advertisement

Have you been satisfied with FEMA’s flood response in Vermont over the past year?

I have been. They came in and I thought did a tremendous job. They were very responsive in their administration. But here’s what I’ve noticed: FEMA does not have the capacity for the long-term rebuilding of a community. They have the capacity for an immediate, short-term response to the disaster. And that’s where I think we’ve got to step back and reform the processes.

And what I’ve seen is that the leadership that is going to address what’s going on in Barre or in Johnson or in Ludlow — that has to be local, and they’ve got to be given flexibility. Because those folks are totally invested in the well-being of their community. And this is where FEMA needs some adjustment, because the FEMA folks now who are attending to these issues, they come and they go. There’s a lot of turnover, and they don’t have the flexibility. And that’s why these disaster relief funds, where there is flexibility, and where there can be local leadership, I think is so essential for the long-term recovery of communities.

Last week, you introduced the Rural Recovery Act, a bill that would essentially create a new program at the U.S. Department of Agriculture to provide rural development offices with more immediate funding for emergency recovery. This was co-sponsored by Sen. Bernie Sanders and Sen. Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire. What exactly would a bill like this change for Vermonters if another flood were to hit?

Essentially, it would create that flexibility I’ve just been talking about and empower the local leaders to provide their response. You know what I’ve seen with the floods that we had last year in July, and what we had going back to [Tropical Storm] Irene [in 2011], was that it was local select boards that got out the Rolodex and started calling up people in the community to come out with their backhoes or their front end loaders or do whatever it was, and get whatever equipment was needed to respond. Well, that flexibility, you need to have down the road. The immediate response is absolutely urgent and essential. But there are things that require long term effort, because it’s rebuilding. And this legislation would essentially create the flexibility and the resources for those rural communities that don’t have that administrative infrastructure to deal with the massive impact of a big flood. Sen. Shaheen is a great ally on this, and Bernie [Sanders] and I will be working on this along with [Rep.] Becca [Balint].

Advertisement

Broadcast live on Thursday, June 13, 2024, at noon; rebroadcast at 7 p.m.

Have questions, comments, or tips? Send us a message or check us out on Instagram.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Vermont

‘Feed a Family’ makes a pitstop in southern Vermont

Published

on

‘Feed a Family’ makes a pitstop in southern Vermont


If you’re unfamiliar with our Feed a Family event, we typically hold this event twice a year with one drive in the winter and another for summer. The summer version of Feed a Family is arguably the most important of the year. Families have kids off from school and are looking to make ends meet, not just at the dinner table but with everyday essentials. The point of our Feed a Family drive is to fight hunger in our local communities by teaming up with gracious hosts, kind sponsors, and very helpful non-profits to tackle it all.

This first round of our Feed a Family event is taking place in Rutland, Vermont at the local Hannaford along South Main Street. Joining us down at Hannaford today to help collect non-perishables, cash donations, sanitary products, etc. were Oliver Subaru in Rutland and Rutland Appliances. They are the two main sponsors for this leg of our Feed a Family event. Curtis VanEps, the General Manager for Oliver Subaru told us that fundraising events like this Feed a Family are the exact events their dealership loves to get involved with. The reason? It “feeds” back into Oliver Subaru’s mission of serving the community and helping out in anyway they can.

Robert Maguire of Rutland Appliances shared those same sentiments and added that Rutland Appliances are very excited to be first-time sponsors of this event. Robert noted that he and some of his employees were very excited to be presented with the opportunity to giveback and did just that by making some donations of their own.

Lastly, all of the donated items and cash donations will go directly to BROC Community Action. They are an organization that helps the underserved communities of Rutland and Bennington Counties. BROC has food shelves to help fight hunger locally but Tom Donahue, the Executive Director of BROC says that they also offer other resources and services when you have fallen on unfortunate times.

Advertisement

Again, all proceeds donated today will be getting used as early as tomorrow. The need is great in southern Vermont and we’re hoping you’ll make a donation of your own. We will be in Rutland at the local Hannaford until 7PM tonight. Stop by, say hello, and make a donation!



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending