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Rhode Island & Connecticut's 704 MW Revolution Wind achieves first 'steel in the water'

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Rhode Island & Connecticut's 704 MW Revolution Wind achieves first 'steel in the water'


The 704-megawatt (M) Revolution Wind, Rhode Island and Connecticut’s first utility-scale offshore wind farm, just hit a major milestone.

Revolution Wind’s site is more than 15 miles south of Rhode Island and 32 miles southeast of Connecticut. The first multi-state offshore wind project is a 50/50 partnership between offshore wind giant Ørsted and New England energy provider Eversource.

“America’s offshore wind industry is scaling up, and the first steel in the water at Revolution Wind is a tremendous milestone for Rhode Island and Connecticut’s clean energy journey,” said David Hardy, group EVP and CEO Americas at Ørsted.

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During the offshore construction phase, a variety of vessels will be active at the site, including construction and transport barges, cable installation vessels, tugboats, supply and support vessels, and protected species observer monitor vessels. Simultaneously, onshore construction is underway on Revolution Wind’s transmission system in North Kingstown, Rhode Island.

In New London, Connecticut, the first turbine components have started to arrive at State Pier, the project’s staging and marshaling port, where they will be assembled by local union labor.

In Rhode Island, crews in Providence are readying for loadout of advanced foundation components built by local union labor at Ørsted and Eversource’s construction hub at ProvPort. Revolution Wind’s crew helicopters and Rhode Island-built crew transfer vessels are based out of Quonset Point.

When it comes online in 2025, Revolution Wind will generate 400 MW of clean power for Rhode Island and 304 MW for Connecticut. Combined, that’s enough clean power for more than 350,000 homes across both states. It will displace nearly 1 million metric tons of carbon emissions annually, the equivalent of taking more than 200,000 cars off the road.

Last weekend, the US offshore wind supply chain marked another major milestone with the christening of the ECO EDISON, the first-ever American-built, owned, and crewed offshore wind service operations vessel. Constructed by over 600 workers across shipyards in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Florida, with components sourced from 34 states, the ECO EDISON will play a crucial role in operating and maintaining Ørsted and Eversource’s offshore wind projects in the Northeast, including Revolution Wind.

Rhode Island has set a goal of achieving 100% clean electricity by 2030, and Connecticut has set a goal of 100% clean electricity by 2040.

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Read more: 2023 was a record year for wind power growth – in numbers


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FTC: We use income earning auto affiliate links. More.



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Rhode Island

Ocean State Job Lot Customers Donate 1,800 Bikes To Children Of Veterans

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Ocean State Job Lot Customers Donate 1,800 Bikes To Children Of Veterans


NORTH KINGSTOWN, RI — Ocean State Job Lot, with the help of its customers, donated 1,800 bicycles to children of military families across the northeast with the launch of its “Buy-Give-Get” program.

The initiative, which ran from May 14 to May 22, invited customers to buy a children’s bike for $100 at any Ocean State Job Lot store, give it back to the store, and get a $100 Crazy Deal Gift Card for future purchases.

“We’re deeply grateful to our loyal customers for their incredible support of our first-ever ‘Buy-Give-Get’ bikes program,” David Sarlitto, the executive director of Ocean State’s nonprofit arm, said. “Thanks to their generosity, we’re able to bring joy and the simple pleasure of riding a bike to children whose parents have sacrificed so much.”

An Ocean State spokesperson said the donated bikes will be distributed with the help of partners such as the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Disabled American Veterans, USA Veterans, and other veteran services. Significant events include donations at Vets Fest in Philadelphia and at Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington, D.C., where bikes will be given to the children of recovering veterans.

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Have a news tip? Email jimmy.bentley@patch.com.



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Rhode Island: 29 arrested for DUI over holiday weekend | ABC6

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Rhode Island: 29 arrested for DUI over holiday weekend | ABC6


PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WLNE) — The Rhode Island State Police have reported that 29 drivers were arrested for driving under the influence over the Memorial Day holiday weekend.

There were also 68 motor vehicle crashes during this period.

State police issued 619 citations for various traffic violations over the course of the weekend as well.

Many of these numbers are generally in line with those from the 2023 Memorial Day holiday.

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Truck drivers made to turn in registration as vehicles taken off road for safety

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Truck drivers made to turn in registration as vehicles taken off road for safety


OWNERS of compact mini trucks have been asked to turn in their registration after a statewide ban against them was passed.

Rhode Island became one of five US states to ban Kei trucks, also known as compact Japanese mini trucks, primarily used for farm work.

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Another U.S. state has banned Kei trucks from its roads

The state tried to allow drivers who registered them before 2021 to keep them, but the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) opposed it, according to CBS affiliate WPRI.

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Kei trucks weigh around 1,500 pounds and have small engines that aren’t capable of speeds over 75 mph.

Other states like Georgia, Pennsylvania, New York, and Maine banned them from being imported due to being “mechanically unfit” for American roads as they aren’t compliant with the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards.

Lawmakers argue their feeble structure, weak engines, and small size make them dangerous for drivers.

‘GRANDFATHERED’

According to the DMV, there are 30 Kei trucks in the country’s smallest state.

Senator Lou DiPalma said earlier this year one of his constituents tried to register the truck and was told it was possible.

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However, they were “taken aback” when they later got notices from the DMV asking them to turn in their registrations and keep their Keis off the road.

The DMV argues that the small, antique trucks aren’t safe and are dangerous to the passengers, other drivers, and pedestrians.

Other antique cars are allowed on the streets because they’re “grandfathered” because they met the safety standards of the United States when they were created, the DMV stated.

Federal law allows cars that are at least 25 years old to be legally imported into the states, but each state can decide if they can be driven on the roads.

Urgent driver warning after more than 1million vehicles pulled off road due to crucial safety feature malfunction

This sudden law didn’t sit well with DiPalma so he and Representative Michelle McGraw created legislation that allowed people who bought and registered Kei vehicles to continue using them.

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“What the bill seeks to do is grandfather everybody who has [a Kei vehicle] and has it registered. It would allow you to re-register if you had it prior to 2021,” DiPalma explained.

The DMV opposed the bill.

“The DMV has made efforts over the last several years to prevent any additional registration of these vehicles,” it wrote.

“There are, however, a handful that still remain registered, and the proposed bill would restrain the DMV’s ability to further eliminate unsafe vehicles from the public roadways of the state.”

Where are Kei trucks banned?

Kei trucks, also known as compact Japanese mini trucks, have started to be banned from certain U.S. states because they are dangerous to have on roads.

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The below states banned the mini trucks from being imported due to being “mechanically unfit” for American roads as they aren’t compliant with the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards.

  • Georgia
  • Pennsylvania
  • New York
  • Maine
  • Rhode Island

THERE’S HOPE

Drivers may be able to keep their Kei trucks by forming a Montana LLC because it has more forgiving vehicle registration laws, according to LLCTLC.

By forming the LCC, the truck owner can register their mini truck in Montana.

The new registration would make it street-legal again.

This not only rids the registration ban, but it also saves money because there is no sales tax on buying cars.

That also means that if you were in the market for a new Kei truck, Montana may have what you’re looking for.

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State officials attempted to create an alternative bill that allowed that allowed those who already have the truck and registration to keep it, but it was shot down by the DMV

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State officials attempted to create an alternative bill that allowed that allowed those who already have the truck and registration to keep it, but it was shot down by the DMVCredit: Alamy



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