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Pregnant New York special education teacher found dead in classroom: 'Gift for teaching'

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An upstate New York special education teacher tragically died in her classroom, along with her unborn baby, the school announced.

A news release from Kendall Elementary School stated that 29-year-old Courtney Fannon was found unresponsive in her empty classroom after school hours on Friday, March 8.

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Despite life-saving measures, both Fannon and her unborn baby were declared dead at 6:30 p.m.

A cause of death has not been released.

FATHER AND SON PAY TRIBUTE TO LATE MOTHER’S MEMORY BY COACHING IN BASKETBALL STATE SEMIFINALS

Courtney Fannon, 29, was found unresponsive in her special education classroom at Kendall Elementary School in Kendall, New York. (Kendall Central School)

According to a GoFundMe page, Fannon was pregnant with her daughter, Hadley Jaye, and was about four weeks away from her expected arrival.

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“For those who did not have the wonderful opportunity to meet or get to know Courtney, there is an endless amount of positive and good things that can only be said about her,” the GoFundMe stated. “She was loving, genuine and organized in a way that always placed her students ahead of herself, ultimately changing the lives of her students and caregivers, always for the positive.”

“As we mourn, we also ask that you hold your loved ones just a little tighter over the next few days, you never know if you will have a tomorrow with them,” the post read.

Kendall Elementary School in Kendall, New York.

Kendall Elementary School said that counselors would be available for students following the death of Fannon. (Google Maps)

The school said that Fannon had a “passion” for teaching special needs students and always had a friendly smile on her face.

“Courtney was a special education teacher who served her students with passion and joy each day,” the school said. “When she wasn’t in her classroom sharing her love and gift for teaching with her students, she could be found walking our halls with a smile and a friendly hello.”

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Mental health counselors will be available to support students, the school said.

The GoFundMe has raised more than $70,000 as of Thursday afternoon.

Fox News has reached out to Kendall Elementary School for comment.

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Boston, MA

Climate activists block rush-hour traffic in Boston – Boston News, Weather, Sports | WHDH 7News

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Climate activists block rush-hour traffic in Boston – Boston News, Weather, Sports | WHDH 7News


BOSTON (WHDH) – Climate protesters blocked rush hour traffic in Boston on Friday as they marched toward South Station as part of a demonstration aimed at raising awareness about the impact fossil fuels have on the environment.

Dozens of protesters blocked traffic on Seaport Boulevard while carrying a banner that read “No New Fossil Fuel Infrastructure.”

Video from Sky7-HD showed the 50 or 60 protesters crowding into the right lane of the roadway.

No additional information was immediately available.

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This is a developing news story; stay with 7NEWS on-air and online for the latest details.

(Copyright (c) 2024 Sunbeam Television. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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Pittsburg, PA

Eastern hellbender’s absence from Pennsylvania’s waterways is warning sign

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Eastern hellbender’s absence from Pennsylvania’s waterways is warning sign


Eastern hellbender’s absence from Pennsylvania’s waterways is warning sign – CBS Pittsburgh

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Despite being the official state amphibian, hellbenders aren’t exactly overflowing in Pennsylvania’s waterways these days.

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Connecticut

UConn Renames Campus Building For Longtime Partner, Aerospace Giant

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UConn Renames Campus Building For Longtime Partner, Aerospace Giant


STORRS, CT — The University of Connecticut has named a campus building after Pratt & Whitney.

The dedication took place Friday with leaders from the UConn College of Engineering and Pratt & Whitney. It marked “a new milestone in innovation and collaboration,” officials said.

The renaming of the building, formerly known as the United Technologies Engineering Building, served as a “timely reminder of the interconnectedness of academia and industry,” officials said., while adding, “By bridging the gap between theory and practice, UConn and Pratt & Whitney are paving the way for transformative discoveries and advancements that will shape the future of engineering and beyond.”

UConn President Radenka Maric added, “The prevalence of the aerospace industry has been a constant in Connecticut. We come full circle today, recognizing Pratt & Whitney as one of the state’s longest established aerospace companies, and for its ties to UConn College of Engineering and the UConn mechanical engineering teams.

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More details are available on the UConn Today news website.

Part of Pratt & Whitney’s recent commitment to the UConn College of Engineering includes the Pratt & Whitney Scholars Program, a $1.25 million investment to serve underrepresented minorities. Those scholars were recognized in a Vergnano Institute for Inclusion showcase later Friday.

The partnership was also recently recognized by the Connecticut Office of Workforce Strategy. The Vergnano Institute and Pratt & Whitney earned an honorable mention for the inaugural Governor’s Workforce Partnership Awards and were recognized last week.



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