Connect with us

Pittsburg, PA

McCorkle: 2024 Pittsburgh Steelers Mock Draft (Version 1.0)

Published

on

McCorkle: 2024 Pittsburgh Steelers Mock Draft (Version 1.0)


Following the first week of free agency, and with a number of trades having taken place to shuffle around the Pittsburgh Steelers’ 2024 selections, this is my first attempt of the season at an every-round mock draft for the team.

Let me know your thoughts in the comments below. This will probably be the last mock that I do until the days leading up to the draft.

ROUND ONE – 20TH OVERALL: AMARIUS MIMS/OT GEORGIA – 6076, 340 LBS.

Analysis: This may not be the most creative, with many other mocks linking him to the Steelers, but it makes too much sense to pass up. He would add an enormous frame to the offensive line and could play on the right side, allowing Broderick Jones to flip back to the left. The Steelers have two new quarterbacks who are dual threats with their arms and legs, and they figure to lean heavily on the two-headed monster of Najee Harris and Jaylen Warren in 2024. Shore up the offensive line at all costs to protect the new quarterbacks and propel the rushing attack to further success.

Mims may not be a completely polished prospect, having only started eight games, but his tape in those games suggests he could be the next great offensive tackle in the NFL. This, along with my second-round pick below, would give the Steelers a chance at having one of the best offensive lines in the league.

Advertisement

Amarius Mims Scouting Report

ROUND TWO – 51ST OVERALL: ZACH FRAZIER/C WEST VIRGINIA – 6025, 313 LBS.

Analysis: Drafting offensive linemen with the top two picks may feel like overkill, but the Steelers are in dire need of a center. The options in the free agency market have dried up, and that could leave James Daniels or Nate Herbig playing out of position if they don’t find another option. Powers-Johnson is almost certainly going to be gone by this pick, so you turn to the next-best option in Frazier.

He has everything you want in a center: the competitive toughness, play strength, balance, and football IQ to be a successful leader of the unit. His highly successful high school wrestling career gave him a unique understanding of body control and leverage that will serve him well in the NFL. Grab Mims and Frazier, and the Steelers’ offensive line is cooking with gas.

Zach Frazier Scouting Report

ROUND THREE – 84TH OVERALL: MALACHI CORLEY/WR WESTERN KENTUCKY – 5110, 215 LBS.

Analysis: The Steelers traded away Diontae Johnson and released Allen Robinson II, and just like that, the WR position shot to the top of the team’s needs. Thankfully, it is one of the deeper receiver classes in recent memory. They already have the big playmaker who can stretch the field in George Pickens., but they lost their possession receiver who excels at getting open and creating yards after the catch. Enter WKU’s Corley.

Advertisement

He is from a smaller program out of Conference USA, but he has 22 touchdowns and over 2,000 yards in the last two seasons. He excels after the catch with good play strength and short-area quickness and was used around the line of scrimmage a lot as a catch-short, run-long weapon.

Malachi Corley Scouting Report

ROUND THREE – 98TH OVERALL: MAX MELTON/CB RUTGERS – 5111, 187 LBS.

Analysis: This is where the Kenny Pickett trade really comes in handy, moving up 22 spots back up into the third round where a slot corner would be the best use of the team’s resources. Currently they have no logical option to play in the slot other than S DeShon Elliott, but he will be playing strong safety more than anything. Melton would be a great pickup as he could become a great player in the slot and provide a meaningful impact on special teams while he develops.

He had an incredible showing at the 2024 NFL Scouting Combine with a 40.5-inch vertical jump, an 11’4″ broad jump, and a 4.39-second 40-yard dash time. He blocked four or five punts in college and was a gunner under head coach Greg Schiano at Rutgers. He played primarily in the slot, so his experience there is exactly what the team needs. He may have tested his way out of range for this pick, but there are so many corners in this draft that he could fall right into the Steelers’ lap.

Max Melton Scouting Report

Advertisement

ROUND FOUR – 119TH OVERALL: MCKINNLEY JACKSON/DL TEXAS A&M – 6014, 326 LBS.

Analysis: It isn’t the greatest draft class for defensive line talent, but the Steelers have a huge depth problem up front on defense, and one or two players will need to be added via the draft. Jackson doesn’t have the length to play all along the line, but he could be a valuable run-stuffer to use on early downs. He played a lot of 0-tech and 3-tech in college and has surprising quickness for his size to provide some juice as a pass rusher. He was also a two-time team captain.

McKinnley Jackson Scouting Report

ROUND SIX – 178TH OVERALL: JAHEIM BELL/TE FLORIDA STATE – 6020, 241 LBS.

Analysis: Bell is listed as a tight end, but he was much more than that at both South Carolina and Florida State. He played a little h-back, tight end, receiver, and even running back. When I asked him at the combine about potentially playing fullback, he said some teams have indeed talked to him about that possibility. He has the right frame for it, and could provide the team with more usage than just being a fullback in certain packages. He is a weapon with the ball in his hands and can make difficult catches in traffic. His blocking improved greatly over his time in college and was actually pretty good in his final season.

He tested very well at the combine, but his size will leave him off some teams’ boards as a tight end. The Steelers figure to utilize the fullback position in Arthur Smith’s offense, and I would bet they were one of the teams that discussed it with him. They had a formal meeting with him at the combine, which is pretty notable given that they barely met with any other Senior Bowl players there.

Jaheim Bell Scouting Report

Advertisement

ROUND SIX – 195TH OVERALL: ERIC WATTS/DL UCONN – 6055, 274 LBS.

Analysis: With the final pick of the Steelers draft, it makes sense to grab a guy with all of the correct measurables to develop into an eventual defensive end. In Alex Kozora’s “what the Steelers look for” study on drafting defensive ends, Watts checks every box other than his weight. He would need to add 15-20 pounds, but he would not be playing in his first year or two anyway. At the combine, he said he had some informal meetings with the Steelers, and he also said that some teams have asked him to put on a little weight if they draft him. He told me that would be no problem to add some weight to his frame. If he can, his testing numbers at the combine are something to marvel at.





Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pittsburg, PA

Eastern hellbender’s absence from Pennsylvania’s waterways is warning sign

Published

on

Eastern hellbender’s absence from Pennsylvania’s waterways is warning sign


Eastern hellbender’s absence from Pennsylvania’s waterways is warning sign – CBS Pittsburgh

Watch CBS News


Despite being the official state amphibian, hellbenders aren’t exactly overflowing in Pennsylvania’s waterways these days.

Advertisement

Be the first to know

Get browser notifications for breaking news, live events, and exclusive reporting.




Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Pittsburg, PA

Marie Watt I-Beam Quilts At Carnegie Art Museum In Pittsburgh

Published

on

Marie Watt I-Beam Quilts At Carnegie Art Museum In Pittsburgh


Marie Watt’s latest installation comes with a soundtrack. Visitors won’t hear it in the gallery, but listen close, and you can read it.

That’s right. Read it.

Advertisement

“Auntie, auntie”

“Sister, sister.”

Sound familiar?

“Mother, mother.”

“Brother, brother.”

Advertisement

Watt (Seneca Nation; b. 1967, Seattle) refers to this as “twinning language” and took as one starting point to her presentation at Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Museum of Art Marvin Gaye’s 1971 smash hit “What’s Going On?”

“That song calls out ‘mother, mother,’ ‘brother, brother,’ and I thought, well, in a Seneca way and in an indigenous way, that call continues and it includes ‘auntie, auntie,’ and ‘grandmother, grandmother,’ and ‘uncle, uncle,’ and it includes ‘sky, sky,’ and ‘water, water,’ and ‘deer, deer,’ and ‘bobcat, bobcat,’” Watt told Forbes.com “This intersection between Marvin Gaye thinking about our relatedness and an indigenous way thinking about our relatedness, which is to say that we’re all connected, and we’re all related.”

Hear it now?

“When Marvin Gaye doubles those words, I started thinking, when he’s calling ‘mother, mother,’ it’s about making this urgent call go further in space, but it also is connected intimately to this history of call and response,” Watt continues. “In an indigenous way, I’ve started thinking of it as a way of calling back to our ancestors and calling forward to future generations.”

Advertisement

Watt sourced the words through collaborations with the museum’s educators, the Pittsburgh Poetry Collective, and invitations to community members of all ages. Her simple prompt was, “what’s going on?”

The words appear on steel I-Beam fragments salvaged around Pittsburgh–historic and reigning steel manufacturing capital of the world.

“(Watt) started thinking about words that we associate with what steel means today in this region,” Liz Park, Richard Armstrong Curator of Contemporary Art at the Carnegie Museum of Art, told Forbes.com. “She had an incredible list of words that are associative and inspired and informed by research and she referred to the words as a bank of words, which again, I thought was a very beautiful way of building language around the material that she’s collecting because these words are also material in the same way the I-Beams are material.”

Soot, soot.

Pride, pride.

Advertisement

Labor, labor.

Carbon, carbon.

Blast, blast.

Words selected, community members were invited to write them on the beams to be subsequently be welded on.

One of the hundreds of I-beams incorporated into Watt’s two sculptures was cast in glass, another industrial material Pittsburgh has long excelled at manufacturing. The artist found casting glass more finicky than expected.

Advertisement

What was supposed to read “Ghost Ghost” instead reads “Host Ghost” as a result of a crack in the glass beam forcing it to be cut.

“It is so perfect in so many ways; the word ‘host’ is so much a part of my ethos as an artist,” Watt explains. “When I do a collaborative project, I set the table and what is created is made by everybody.”

As TV painter Bob Ross used to say, no mistakes, just “happy accidents.”

I-Beam Quilts

It’s doubtful anyone other than the artist will initially view her room filling steel sculptures as quilts. I-Beam quilts. Watt’s use of quilts and blankets is what she’s best known for.

“I don’t know if they chose me or if I chose (them), and I guess that speaks to the way that I like to work with materials,” Watt said of her predilection for perceiving the world through the prism of quilts and blankets. “My initial interest in working with blankets came from how I see them functioning in my family and community. We give away blankets to honor people for being witness to important life events, but I quickly realized as I started working with salvage blankets from thrift stores and tag sales and things that people would give me knowing that was a base material for me, that we’re received in these objects, we depart the world in these objects, and we’re constantly imprinting on them.”

Watt’s “Blanket Story” sculptures–stacks of neatly folded blankets, each with a unique story to tell, sometimes rising nearly 20 feet–fill the most prestigious art museums from coast-to-coast.

“I think they have a life and energy of their own and I want to be a good listener,” Watt said. “Blankets were the beginning of this deep interest I have in listening to materials and working with materials that are often organic in nature, and that connect to our stories.”

Like steel.

Advertisement

Helping inspire the commission in Pittsburgh, and an offshoot of Watt’s “Blanket Stories,” are her Skywalker/Skyscraper sculptures featuring blankets wrapped around an erect I-Beam. She was drawn to the I-Beam’s interwoven history with generations of Haudenosaunee ironworkers, known as “Skywalkers,” who built many of the iconic landmarks in the Manhattan skyline and other urban infrastructure.

“When I visited Marie in her studio, the thing I was struck by is how she surrounds herself with materials, and she’s been collecting materials with intention, she doesn’t just source it from anywhere she wishes,” Park said. “She approaches that as an important part of her practice and process… literally, there were stacks of blankets (in her studio) that she described as a library of blankets.”

A library of blankets. A bank of words. I-Beams. All seemingly very different, but in Watt’s perspective, all materials.

“One thing I love about working with (I-Beams) on this scale and at this site is that I’ve become so keenly aware of the history that’s embedded in this fabric–this material,” Watt explained. “This material has been touched by so many different people and when we see it without text, it oftentimes presents as cold and structural and engineered, we forget about the human hand and the stories connected to that material.”

Just like–you guessed it–quilts and blankets.

Advertisement

Marie Watt Takes America

“Marie Watt: LAND STITCHES WATER SKY” at the Carnegie Museum of Art through September 22, 2024, is one of three major, solo exhibitions of the artist’s work on view across the country presently. It joins “Storywork: The Prints of Marie Watt, from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation,” (through May 18, 2024) at Print Center New York, the artist’s first traveling retrospective and the first reflecting on the role of printmaking in her interdisciplinary work, and “Marie Watt: SKY DANCES LIGHT” at the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, TX (through October 20, 2024) featuring sculptural works composed of thousands of tin cones sewn on mesh netting creating abstract cloud-like forms hanging from the ceiling.

That degree of institutional attention is rare for a living artist. Exceedingly rare for a living female artist. Nearly unprecedented for a living, female, Indigenous artist.

“I’m making up for lost time,” Watt said of the attention. “I’ve always been making this work, so what is present to other people or institutions is not necessarily what I see or experience.”

Advertisement

The kind of 20-year-in-the-making “overnight success” typical in the arts or music. Despite a pedigree no less esteemed than receiving her Master of Fine Arts degree from Yale University, only recently has Watt felt like her career stands on solid ground.

“This sounds strange even when I say it out loud, but I think it took turning 50 where I told myself that it looks like this is what I’m going to do when I grow up,” she said laughing. “I don’t know why I felt like this career of being an artist was something that somebody could suddenly pull the rug out from under me and then I would have to go back to another type of day job.”

As long as Watt has materials, she’ll continue finding unique ways of sharing stories through them, and a career. Lucky for us, there is no shortage of quilts, and words, and steel waiting for her.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Pittsburg, PA

What to do to help save plants hit by unexpected frost in Pittsburgh area

Published

on

What to do to help save plants hit by unexpected frost in Pittsburgh area


PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — With a frost hitting parts of the Pittsburgh area this morning, what can you do right now to save the plants you might’ve planted over the past couple of weeks? 

KDKA’s John Shumway spoke with an expert and found that if you took no action, there is a glimmer of hope out there.

When your livelihood depends on the crops you are raising, you take frost very seriously. 

Rob Shenot of Shenot Farms in Wexford says that if you took no action, the best thing you can do is to hope that things don’t turn out as bad as you thought they were going to. 

Advertisement

While the chance to cover your plants may have passed, Shenot says that setting up a fan to blow across the plants might help. 

“Just move some air around to keep the frost from settling on the the flower buds for instance,” Shenot said. “That might be an effective thing just to keep keep the air moving a little bit.”

As for what you need to worry about, Shenot says that tomato plants would be very vulnerable along with pepper plants and flowers, if they’re an annual. 

Shenot said that vegetable plants like kale, broccoli, or things in the cabbage family are going to be just fine. 

The good news is that the frost this morning isn’t going to be around long and the sun and rising temperatures will help. Then you will just have to wait and see if your plants recover.

Advertisement

In some cases, it will be obvious that the plant is dead as its leaves could turn black and shrivel.

In other cases, it may take a few days or weeks to be able to tell if the plant is going to recover.

One thing you might want to do once the temperature gets into the upper 40’s or close to 50 degrees is water the base of the plant. That might help with recovery. 

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending