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Heathy snacks to fight off midnight cravings

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Heathy snacks to fight off midnight cravings


Heathy snacks to fight off midnight cravings – CBS Pittsburgh

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Dieticians say foods rich in magnesium, antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids get the seal of approval if you head to the kitchen late at night.

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Pittsburg, PA

The Pittsburgh Jazz Fest 1964 – Mary Lou Williams and more – on the Scene — WZUM Jazz Pittsburgh

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The Pittsburgh Jazz Fest 1964 – Mary Lou Williams and more – on the Scene  — WZUM Jazz Pittsburgh


September 1964 – the Beatles played the Pittsburgh Civic Arena for their first and only show in the Steel City. Months earlier, a very major first happened in that same location, with echoes reverberating from 60 years ago now .

The lineup for the 2024 Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival will be announced April 30th for the September event. The idea of a Jazz Festival in Pittsburgh started much earlier – concerts June 19th and 20th 1964 at the Pittsburgh Civic Arena – with planning led by Mary Lou Williams that went on for several years.

We’ve not yet found a printed program or compressive report of that notable weekend, but through columns and articles from the Post-Gazette, the Pittsburgh Press and the New Pittsburgh Courier, a fuller picture of the notable weekend comes in to view – plus, a few stellar photos by the legendary Teenie Harris!

It was a very Pittsburgh focused event with a global ambition. “Hometown” headliners – the Mary Lou Williams trio (Larry Gales – bass, Percy Brice – drums), vocalist Dakota Staton and Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers; The Walt Harper Quartet, the Harold Betters Quartet with Benny Benack. Add in the (40 piece) Pittsburgh Jazz Festival Orchestra, directed by Melba Liston.

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Other headliners included the Dave Brubeck Quartet, the Thelonious Monk Quartet (featuring Charlie Rouse), The Jimmy Smith Trio and a band led by trombonist Al Gray. Also, vocalists Joe Williams and Jimmy Rushing.

Also on the playbill, the Bernice Johnson Dancers and Comedian “Moms” Mabley. Plus Ruby Braff, Bud Freeman, Pee Wee Russell, Shorty Baker, Snookie Young, Percy Brice, and Ben Tucker.

A number of stories from the festival that caught our attention – a column by Carl Apone wrote about a “long awaited $20,000 improvement to the Civic Arena’s sound system” that would get its first real test from the Jazz Festival – to be followed by a concert by Nat King Cole for the Civic Light Opera season July 6, 1964. In that same column, Carl Apone noted that ticket sales were lagging just a week before the festival – sales of only $3,500 towards the $30,000 talent budget alone. Whatever happened next, total sales ended up at about $36,000. The “acid test” was the rehearsal for the Festival before doors opened on June 19, 1964 – for the biggest sound system in the region at the time.

Part of the positive net financials came from a cancellation – Sarah Vaughan was scheduled to attend – but cancelled shortly before the Festival. As noted in several articles , the $2,700 cancellation refund from the Sarah Vaughan booking was enough to swing the festival into a profit for the weekend. Making a profit helped lead to the return of the festival in 1965 with a 3 day event.

The sponsor of the event was the Catholic Youth Organization under the direction of the Rev. Michael Williams, with the encouragement of the leader of the Pittsburgh Diocese, Bishop John Wright. Governor William Scranton and former Governor David L. Lawrence served as honorary Chairmen. Mayor Joseph Barr issued a proclamation declaring “June is Jazz Month.”

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The producers of the Festival were Mary Lou Williams and legendary festival promoter George Wein.

We’ll talk about the festival, and play some of the music that relates to it on The Scene – Also, a revisit to a chat with adoptive Pittsburgh jazz artist and author Deanna Witkowski – currently finalizing work on her PhD in Jazz Studies at Pitt – she did research on the importance of Mary Lou Williams’ Pittsburgh connections in getting the festival started.

Thursday night at six, Friday and Saturday at noon, Sunday afternoon at 5 on WZUM.





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Pittsburg, PA

Operator of Pittsburgh-area casino fined $10,000 for letting in gambler on self-exclusion list

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Operator of Pittsburgh-area casino fined $10,000 for letting in gambler on self-exclusion list


Pennsylvania lawmaker to introduce legislation to tackle dark side of online gambling

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Pennsylvania lawmaker to introduce legislation to tackle dark side of online gambling

03:12

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WASHINGTON, Pa. (KDKA) — The operator of Hollywood Casino at The Meadows in Washington County has been fined $10,000 for letting someone gamble who was on a self-exclusion list, officials announced. 

The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board approved a consent agreement on Wednesday to fine Washington Trotting Association, LLC, which operates the casino.

The board said a person on the self-exclusion list was allowed inside to gamble at slot machines and cash checks at the casino. When someone puts themselves on the list, a casino operator has to deny gaming and cash-checking privileges, the board says.

If a person on the self-exclusion list is caught in a gaming facility, they can be charged with defiant trespass, which the board says happened in this case. 

In October, the Live! Casino in Westmoreland County was fined $30,000 for letting in someone who was underage and two people who were self-excluded from gambling. 

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The board says it offers self-exclusion programs to help people distance themselves from the temptation of gambling. It allows people to voluntarily ban themselves from casinos, internet-based gambling, video gaming terminals and fantasy sports wagering. 

Last year, Pennsylvania brought in a record $5.7 billion in revenue from gambling, and in March, the state’s monthly gaming revenue passed $500 million for the first time since legalized gambling began in 2006.



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Pittsburgh Regional Transit hears bus riders' needs, expects route changes early next year – Pittsburgh Union Progress

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Pittsburgh Regional Transit hears bus riders' needs, expects route changes early next year – Pittsburgh Union Progress


Pittsburgh Regional Transit’s bus line redesign process is finding what the agency suspected: Riding patterns have changed since the pandemic and the agency’s ability to grow will depend on meeting those needs.

The agency’s route planning division began a review of more than 90 bus routes last October and discussed the first round of its public outreach with its Planning & Stakeholder Relations Committee last week. The initial guidance indicates riders want more service to Pittsburgh International Airport and Oakland, better connections between local neighborhoods, service spread throughout the day rather than bunching it during rush hours, and improved frequency and reliability.

“What we’re hearing is people are going different places, not just to work,” Amy Silbermann, PRT’s chief development officer, said in an interview after the committee meeting. “There will be a different balance” of service when the agency begins to implement the plans early next year.

Derek Dauphin, director of planning and service development, said the agency’s challenge is meeting those needs initially without increasing the annual budget. Limited bus operators and lack of additional space at maintenance garages make a huge expansion with a lot of new vehicles difficult at this time.

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But by adjusting service in areas with less ridership — perhaps reducing hours during nonpeak travel times or on weekends — there are hours available to shift to other service to better meet riders’ needs, Dauphin said.

“What we’re finding is there are some hours we can acquire,” Dauphin said in an interview. “We think there are hours we can reallocate.”

One element that seems almost inevitable is that many changes will require riders to transfer to get to new locations, Dauphin said. Although the agency has eliminated transfer fees for noncash customers, he acknowledged that persuading riders to change vehicles could be a hard sell.

“We’re certain that it will be,” he said. “We assume a big part of the process will be marketing the changes and showing the people the value [of the adjusted service].”

If the early changes are successful at increasing ridership and the agency can build a fifth maintenance garage, it will be able to implement additional changes using the blueprint it is developing now.

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Although additional airport service is high on the list for riders, Dauphin said it is too soon to say whether that can be one of the early changes. The agency expects to refine what it heard from riders in the next few months and return to the public in September with recommended changes.



Ed Blazina

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Ed covers transportation at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, but he’s currently on strike. Email him at eblazina@unionprogress.com.

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