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Game Preview: Detroit Red Wings @ Pittsburgh Penguins 3/17/2024 – Lines, how to watch

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Game Preview: Detroit Red Wings @ Pittsburgh Penguins 3/17/2024 – Lines, how to watch


Who: Detroit Red Wings (34-27-6, 74 points, 5th place Atlantic Division) @ Pittsburgh Penguins (29-28-9, 67 points, 7th place Metropolitan Division)

When: 6 p.m. ET

How to Watch: Sportsnet Pittsburgh and Bally Sports Detroit in the local markets, NHL Network for the rest

Pens’ Path Ahead: The Pens head to New Jersey for a Tuesday night game, then get their first instance of two consecutive days without games since Feb 23-24. The road trip continues next Friday in Dallas and then ends in Colorado a week from today.

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Opponent Track: The Red Wings are probably the most volatile team in the NHL right now. They were unstoppable coming out of the All-Star break, going 7-2-0 that included a six-game winning streak. Vibes were through the roof when they smacked down the Capitals by an 8-3 final score on February 27th. Then the roller coaster went down and they lost seven straight games going into yesterday’s game against Buffalo. They’ve been booed off the ice at home and had teammates fighting in practice as times have gotten tough.

Season Series: Detroit took the first game 6-3 way back in mid-October and the two teams haven’t seen each other since. They play again on April 11th near the end of the season to close out the three-game series.

Getting to know the Red Wings

Projected lines (from practice on Friday)

FORWARDS

Alex DeBrincat – J.T. Compher – Patrick Kane

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David Perron – Joe Veleno – Lucas Raymond

Michael Rasmussen – Andrew Copp – Christian Fischer

Robby Fabbri – Austin Czarnik – Daniel Sprong

DEFENSEMEN

Shayne Gostisbehere / Moritz Seider

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Ben Chiarot / Jeff Petry

Olli Maatta / Justin Holl

Goalies: Alex Lyon, Ville Husso (James Reimer started yesterday)

Possible scratches: Jake Wallman, Jonatan Berggren, Dylan Larkin

IR: none

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—Sounds like Larkin is out with an injury through today, which is a break for the Pens to not see Detroit’s leading scorer.

—Wallman and Sprong are each dealing with minor injuries, it’s possible Wallman could be back for today.

Player stats

(via hockeydb, not including yesterday’s game)

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—Patrick Kane is something more of a hockey player and into a medical marvel at this point. He had the hip surgery that quickly ended the careers of players like Ryan Kesler, Ed Jovanovski and Nicklas Backstrom. Kane (plus medical technology) has raised the bar and is showing that the hip resurfacing isn’t the automatic career ender that is once was under the right circumstances.

—Daniel Sprong is having one of the more interesting career paths in recent memory. The Red Wings mark his fourth different team in the last five seasons. He’s good at scoring, bad at finding a niche anywhere — he’s only played in the 11-13 minute range on lower lines at every stop of the way. He’s productive, but still never found a comfortable fit with any coach or team he’s been at.

And now for the Penguins

Projected lines

FORWARDS

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Drew O’Connor – Sidney Crosby – Bryan Rust

Michael Bunting – Evgeni Malkin – Rickard Rakell

Reilly Smith – Lars Eller – Valtteri Puustinen

Emil Bemstrom – Noel Acciari – Jeff Carter

DEFENSEMEN

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Marcus Pettersson / Kris Letang

Ryan Graves / Erik Karlsson

John Ludvig / P.O. Joseph

Goalies: Alex Nedeljkovic (Tristan Jarry started yesterday)

Potential Scratches: Jesse Puljujarvi, John St. Ivany

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IR: Matt Nieto (knee surgery), Jansen Harkins (hand injury)



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Pittsburg, PA

Marie Watt I-Beam Quilts At Carnegie Art Museum In Pittsburgh

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Marie Watt I-Beam Quilts At Carnegie Art Museum In Pittsburgh


Marie Watt’s latest installation comes with a soundtrack. Visitors won’t hear it in the gallery, but listen close, and you can read it.

That’s right. Read it.

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“Auntie, auntie”

“Sister, sister.”

Sound familiar?

“Mother, mother.”

“Brother, brother.”

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Watt (Seneca Nation; b. 1967, Seattle) refers to this as “twinning language” and took as one starting point to her presentation at Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Museum of Art Marvin Gaye’s 1971 smash hit “What’s Going On?”

“That song calls out ‘mother, mother,’ ‘brother, brother,’ and I thought, well, in a Seneca way and in an indigenous way, that call continues and it includes ‘auntie, auntie,’ and ‘grandmother, grandmother,’ and ‘uncle, uncle,’ and it includes ‘sky, sky,’ and ‘water, water,’ and ‘deer, deer,’ and ‘bobcat, bobcat,’” Watt told Forbes.com “This intersection between Marvin Gaye thinking about our relatedness and an indigenous way thinking about our relatedness, which is to say that we’re all connected, and we’re all related.”

Hear it now?

“When Marvin Gaye doubles those words, I started thinking, when he’s calling ‘mother, mother,’ it’s about making this urgent call go further in space, but it also is connected intimately to this history of call and response,” Watt continues. “In an indigenous way, I’ve started thinking of it as a way of calling back to our ancestors and calling forward to future generations.”

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Watt sourced the words through collaborations with the museum’s educators, the Pittsburgh Poetry Collective, and invitations to community members of all ages. Her simple prompt was, “what’s going on?”

The words appear on steel I-Beam fragments salvaged around Pittsburgh–historic and reigning steel manufacturing capital of the world.

“(Watt) started thinking about words that we associate with what steel means today in this region,” Liz Park, Richard Armstrong Curator of Contemporary Art at the Carnegie Museum of Art, told Forbes.com. “She had an incredible list of words that are associative and inspired and informed by research and she referred to the words as a bank of words, which again, I thought was a very beautiful way of building language around the material that she’s collecting because these words are also material in the same way the I-Beams are material.”

Soot, soot.

Pride, pride.

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Labor, labor.

Carbon, carbon.

Blast, blast.

Words selected, community members were invited to write them on the beams to be subsequently be welded on.

One of the hundreds of I-beams incorporated into Watt’s two sculptures was cast in glass, another industrial material Pittsburgh has long excelled at manufacturing. The artist found casting glass more finicky than expected.

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What was supposed to read “Ghost Ghost” instead reads “Host Ghost” as a result of a crack in the glass beam forcing it to be cut.

“It is so perfect in so many ways; the word ‘host’ is so much a part of my ethos as an artist,” Watt explains. “When I do a collaborative project, I set the table and what is created is made by everybody.”

As TV painter Bob Ross used to say, no mistakes, just “happy accidents.”

I-Beam Quilts

It’s doubtful anyone other than the artist will initially view her room filling steel sculptures as quilts. I-Beam quilts. Watt’s use of quilts and blankets is what she’s best known for.

“I don’t know if they chose me or if I chose (them), and I guess that speaks to the way that I like to work with materials,” Watt said of her predilection for perceiving the world through the prism of quilts and blankets. “My initial interest in working with blankets came from how I see them functioning in my family and community. We give away blankets to honor people for being witness to important life events, but I quickly realized as I started working with salvage blankets from thrift stores and tag sales and things that people would give me knowing that was a base material for me, that we’re received in these objects, we depart the world in these objects, and we’re constantly imprinting on them.”

Watt’s “Blanket Story” sculptures–stacks of neatly folded blankets, each with a unique story to tell, sometimes rising nearly 20 feet–fill the most prestigious art museums from coast-to-coast.

“I think they have a life and energy of their own and I want to be a good listener,” Watt said. “Blankets were the beginning of this deep interest I have in listening to materials and working with materials that are often organic in nature, and that connect to our stories.”

Like steel.

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Helping inspire the commission in Pittsburgh, and an offshoot of Watt’s “Blanket Stories,” are her Skywalker/Skyscraper sculptures featuring blankets wrapped around an erect I-Beam. She was drawn to the I-Beam’s interwoven history with generations of Haudenosaunee ironworkers, known as “Skywalkers,” who built many of the iconic landmarks in the Manhattan skyline and other urban infrastructure.

“When I visited Marie in her studio, the thing I was struck by is how she surrounds herself with materials, and she’s been collecting materials with intention, she doesn’t just source it from anywhere she wishes,” Park said. “She approaches that as an important part of her practice and process… literally, there were stacks of blankets (in her studio) that she described as a library of blankets.”

A library of blankets. A bank of words. I-Beams. All seemingly very different, but in Watt’s perspective, all materials.

“One thing I love about working with (I-Beams) on this scale and at this site is that I’ve become so keenly aware of the history that’s embedded in this fabric–this material,” Watt explained. “This material has been touched by so many different people and when we see it without text, it oftentimes presents as cold and structural and engineered, we forget about the human hand and the stories connected to that material.”

Just like–you guessed it–quilts and blankets.

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Marie Watt Takes America

“Marie Watt: LAND STITCHES WATER SKY” at the Carnegie Museum of Art through September 22, 2024, is one of three major, solo exhibitions of the artist’s work on view across the country presently. It joins “Storywork: The Prints of Marie Watt, from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation,” (through May 18, 2024) at Print Center New York, the artist’s first traveling retrospective and the first reflecting on the role of printmaking in her interdisciplinary work, and “Marie Watt: SKY DANCES LIGHT” at the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, TX (through October 20, 2024) featuring sculptural works composed of thousands of tin cones sewn on mesh netting creating abstract cloud-like forms hanging from the ceiling.

That degree of institutional attention is rare for a living artist. Exceedingly rare for a living female artist. Nearly unprecedented for a living, female, Indigenous artist.

“I’m making up for lost time,” Watt said of the attention. “I’ve always been making this work, so what is present to other people or institutions is not necessarily what I see or experience.”

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The kind of 20-year-in-the-making “overnight success” typical in the arts or music. Despite a pedigree no less esteemed than receiving her Master of Fine Arts degree from Yale University, only recently has Watt felt like her career stands on solid ground.

“This sounds strange even when I say it out loud, but I think it took turning 50 where I told myself that it looks like this is what I’m going to do when I grow up,” she said laughing. “I don’t know why I felt like this career of being an artist was something that somebody could suddenly pull the rug out from under me and then I would have to go back to another type of day job.”

As long as Watt has materials, she’ll continue finding unique ways of sharing stories through them, and a career. Lucky for us, there is no shortage of quilts, and words, and steel waiting for her.



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What to do to help save plants hit by unexpected frost in Pittsburgh area

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What to do to help save plants hit by unexpected frost in Pittsburgh area


PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — With a frost hitting parts of the Pittsburgh area this morning, what can you do right now to save the plants you might’ve planted over the past couple of weeks? 

KDKA’s John Shumway spoke with an expert and found that if you took no action, there is a glimmer of hope out there.

When your livelihood depends on the crops you are raising, you take frost very seriously. 

Rob Shenot of Shenot Farms in Wexford says that if you took no action, the best thing you can do is to hope that things don’t turn out as bad as you thought they were going to. 

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While the chance to cover your plants may have passed, Shenot says that setting up a fan to blow across the plants might help. 

“Just move some air around to keep the frost from settling on the the flower buds for instance,” Shenot said. “That might be an effective thing just to keep keep the air moving a little bit.”

As for what you need to worry about, Shenot says that tomato plants would be very vulnerable along with pepper plants and flowers, if they’re an annual. 

Shenot said that vegetable plants like kale, broccoli, or things in the cabbage family are going to be just fine. 

The good news is that the frost this morning isn’t going to be around long and the sun and rising temperatures will help. Then you will just have to wait and see if your plants recover.

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In some cases, it will be obvious that the plant is dead as its leaves could turn black and shrivel.

In other cases, it may take a few days or weeks to be able to tell if the plant is going to recover.

One thing you might want to do once the temperature gets into the upper 40’s or close to 50 degrees is water the base of the plant. That might help with recovery. 

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Syracuse’s comeback falls short in 7-5 loss to Pittsburgh

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Syracuse’s comeback falls short in 7-5 loss to Pittsburgh


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Trailing by six in the second inning, Syracuse wasn’t fazed by its disastrous start to the game. Mackenzie Foster and Kelly Breen hit singles and the Orange then loaded the bases after Rebecca Clyde walked.

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Pitt starter Olivia Stefanoni continued her struggles, walking Madelyn Lopez, which brought Foster home to score SU’s first run. With one of the best opportunities to close the gap, Angel Jasso, who had seven hits across the series, stepped up again for Syracuse with a two-run single. The Orange cut their deficit to 6-3, but they couldn’t make up for their slow start throughout the rest of the game.

In the final game of its three-game series against Pittsburgh on Sunday, Syracuse’s (21-20, 5-13 ACC) comeback effort fell short in its 7-5 loss to Pittsburgh (15-29, 6-12 ACC). After losing the series, Syracuse is the No. 12 seed in the conference standings—two sports behind ACC Tournament eligibility. Meanwhile, Pittsburgh now possesses the No. 10 seed and is in place to qualify for the ACC Tournament as the final team in.

Saturday’s matchup showcased Syracuse’s phenomenal offensive prowess, as the team blasted three homers and 16 hits. Though in the final game of the series — after the teams split the first two contests — the Panthers opened fire in the first inning.



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As Kat Rodriguez stole second, Cami Thompson — who hit homers Friday and Saturday — hit another long ball to give Pittsburgh a two-run lead. Then, Desirae Martinez hit a solo homer to center field, extending Pitt’s lead.

KK Esparza kept the Panthers’ momentum going with a single up the middle, prompting the Orange to sub Lindsey Hendrix into the circle. Despite the pitching change, Pitt’s Rachael Fuerst blasted a homer on Hendrix’s first pitch, establishing a 5-0 lead with just one out.

The Panthers’ threat didn’t end there. Ana Hernandez then hit Pitt’s fourth home run in the first inning. Syracuse eventually got the third out thanks to Kelly Breen, who retired Macy Hamilton with a clean throw to first base.

After SU didn’t score in the top of the frame, Pittsburgh extended its lead to 7-0 in the bottom of the second. After Hendrix conceded a walk, Kylie Griggs stole second despite getting caught in a pickle. Amanda Ramirez then sent Griggs home on a single to right center field.

Though that was the last time the Panthers scored, allowing Syracuse to cut into its deficit. The Orange had two decent chances to score in the third and sixth innings, but they couldn’t capitalize.

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Syracuse remained scoreless until the final inning. Posner opened up the frame with a single to the left side. Madison Knight, who pitched the later 2.1 innings of the game, ripped a homer, bringing Syracuse’s deficit to 7-5. Though Pitt pitcher Peyton Schemmer settled down, ending SU’s comeback effort to seal a crucial series win for the Panthers.



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