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Massachusetts Outmigration Up By 1,100 Percent Since 2013

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Massachusetts Outmigration Up By 1,100 Percent Since 2013


Massachusetts and Rhode Island are among the top 15 states for outmigration. That means folks are heading for the exits, and in most cases, taking their money with them.

According to Yahoo Finance, the population of Massachusetts declined by 0.1 percent between 2021 and 2022, ranking the state at 13th in the top 15 “fastest declining” states in the U.S. Rhode Island ranked ninth as the Ocean State’s population dropped from 1,096,958 in 2021 to 1,093,734 in 2022, a 0.3 percent decline.

Fox Business says, “Massachusetts is in danger of losing nearly $1 billion in annual revenue over the coming years as high state taxes trigger an exodus of wealthy residents.”

The network reports, “Since 2013, migration out of Massachusetts has seen an ‘alarming’ 1,100% increase to more than 39,000 people, according to new findings published by Boston University’s Questrom School of Business.”

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Massachusetts Outmigration Up By 1,100 Percent Since 2013

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BU’s study summarizes that “Massachusetts’ competitive advantage to attract, retain, and grow its population and workforce is slipping.” The report says, “Outmigration from the Commonwealth is accelerating at an alarming rate” and that “the decision by individuals and families to move from one state to another is multifactional.”

The university’s study attributes the sharp increase in outmigration to such factors as “level of income tax, housing and healthcare cost.” It says, “Increased mobility, choice, and remote work are adding to outbound migration.”

“The financial impact in lost adjusted gross income and income tax revenue is in the billions of dollars,” according to the report.

Fox Business says, “The Bay State has already lost $821 million in income tax revenue since 2011.”

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Florida and New Hampshire are the top destinations for people fleeing Massachusetts. Other popular destinations include Maine, North Carolina, and Texas. Fox says, “About half of the residents who left Massachusetts remained in New England.”

Read the Boston University’s Questrom School of Business report on the impacts of outmigration on the Commonwealth here.

LOOK: The 25 least expensive states to live in

Gallery Credit: Aubrey Jane McClaine

LOOK: This is where homes are selling the fastest right now

Stacker compiled a list of the metros where houses are selling the fastest, according to data from Redfin.

Gallery Credit: Stacker Staff





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Massachusetts

Massachusetts on verge of becoming second-to-last state to outlaw 'revenge porn'

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Massachusetts on verge of becoming second-to-last state to outlaw 'revenge porn'


BOSTON — A bill aimed at outlawing “revenge porn” has been approved by lawmakers in the Massachusetts House and Senate and shipped to Democratic Gov. Maura Healey, a move advocates say was long overdue.

If signed by Healey, the bill — which bars the sharing of explicit images or videos without the consent of those depicted in the videos — would leave South Carolina as the only state not to have a law specifically banning revenge porn.

Supports say the bill, which landed on Healey’s desk Thursday, would align Massachusetts with the other 48 states that have clear prohibitions on disseminating sexually explicit images and videos without the subject’s consent. It is a form of abuse that advocates say has grown increasingly common in the digital age, subjecting people to social and emotional harm often inflicted by former romantic partners.

The bill would make disseminating nude or partially nude photos of another person without their permission criminal harassment. Offenders would face up to two and a half years in prison and a fine of $10,000. On subsequent offenses, the punishment would increase to up to 10 years in prison and a fine of $15,000.

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“No person’s life should devolve into chaos because a private photo was shared without their permission, and no person should fear coercion or be threatened with the sharing of such a photo,” Senate President Karen Spilka said.

The bill explicitly states that even though a person might consent to the initial creation of an explicit image or video that doesn’t mean they are also agreeing that it can be distributed without their additional consent in the future.

The advent of artificial intelligence and deepfake technology in the creation of revenge porn has added to the concerns of lawmakers. Supporters said the bill opens the door to legislation further addressing the implications of the emerging technology.

Karissa Hand, an aide to Healey, said the governor, who was previously the state’s attorney general, “has long supported legislation to ban revenge porn and hold accountable those who would engage in abusive, coercive and deeply harmful behavior” and looks forward to reviewing any legislation that reaches her desk.

The legislation establishes a definition for coercive control to account for non-physical forms of abuse such as isolation, threatening harm toward a family member or pet, controlling or monitoring activities, damaging property, publishing sensitive information, and repeated legal action.

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Advocates describe coercive control as a pattern of deliberate behavior by an abuser that substantially restricts another person’s safety and autonomy.

By expanding the statute of limitation for domestic violence charges to 15 years, the bill would also give survivors a longer time to seek justice.

Under current law, minors who possess, purchase or share explicit photos of themselves or other minors are charged with violating child sexual abuse image laws and are required to register as sex offenders.

The bill would instead require the state attorney general to develop an educational diversion program to provide adolescents who engage in revenge porn with information about the consequences and life-altering effects caused by engaging in the behavior.

District attorneys would still have the authority to petition the court to bring criminal charges in extreme cases.

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Jane Doe Inc., the Massachusetts Coalition Against Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence, called passage of the bill in the Legislature “a milestone for survivors in Massachusetts.”

“Non-consensual sharing of intimate images impacts thousands of people in Massachusetts every year, and increases an individual’s likelihood of further sexual harm,” the group said in a written statement.

“This bill takes a thoughtful approach to addressing the problem – one that balances strong protections for survivors with a recognition that younger people who cause this harm often can and should benefit from educational diversion over prosecution,” the group added.



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23 sets of twins graduate from one Massachusetts middle school

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23 sets of twins graduate from one Massachusetts middle school


NEEDHAM, Mass. (AP) — Twenty-three sets of twins have graduated from a Massachusetts middle school, making up about 10% of the eighth-grade class.

The identical and fraternal twins graduated from Pollard Middle School in Needham, Massachusetts, on Wednesday. Another student, who is also a twin, graduated but her brother attends a different school, said principal Tamatha Bibbo.

It’s “quite unusual,” said Bibbo. “We typically have anywhere from five to 10 sets at most. Given our numbers, we have approximately 450 to 500 children in each grade so this was extraordinarily high.”

The school gave a special shout-out to the 23 sets of twins during the so-called “moving up” ceremony on Wednesday, she said. Twins account for around 3% of live births in the U.S., according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

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The Pollard Middle School graduates must all have completed up to 10 hours of service learning in their communities, and every year, the Needham Exchange Club offers five community service awards. For the first time this year, a set of twins — Lukas and Sameer Patel — won an award and a donation to their charity, Bibbo said.



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Massachusetts House Passes Bill Strengthening LGBTQ+ Parents' Rights

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BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts House lawmakers unanimously approved a bill Wednesday aimed at updating the state’s parentage laws to include LGBTQ+ parents and families that used methods such as assisted reproduction and surrogacy. The bill would remove one of the last vestiges of Massachusetts law …



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