Connect with us

Maine

12/3: Maine Waterfall

Published

on

12/3: Maine Waterfall


Here’s something you don’t see very often, racing in front of a waterfall! This is the Great Falls of the Androscoggin River in Lewiston, Maine for the Riverfest Regatta in July. The race is an out and back with a stakeboat turn with both the start and the finish directly in front of the bridge in view.

While the waterfall looks quite close to the bridge, it’s actually a little over 200 meters past the bridge. This was our first time covering this event so we don’t have first hand knowledge of what the river normally looks like, but based off conversation with locals, the waterfall at that time of the year is typically just a dribble of water. Some heavy thunderstorms rolled through the area at 2am before the regatta, with the resulting rain turning the fall in to a torrent.

This image is featured in the 2024 row2k Wall calendar, and more images can be viewed in our race gallery.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Maine

Restoring Maine’s Once-Vibrant Public Buildings

Published

on

Restoring Maine’s Once-Vibrant Public Buildings


By Sarah Stebbins
From our March 2024 issue

In 1880, the prospect of a new auditorium in the town of Dover generated much enthusiasm. “We can build a hall to which we shall be pleased to invite friends and strangers, let us be about it!” declared the Piscataquis Observer. Two years later, nearly 800 people attended the grand opening of the 7,200-square-foot mansard-roof Central Hall. In the ensuing decades, it hosted town meetings, dances, plays, graduations, silent movies, roller-skating nights, and basketball games. In 1925, two years after Dover merged with neighboring Foxcroft to form Maine’s only hyphenated town, an indoor shooting range was added. But the second-floor event space, with its handsome wooden stage and balcony, eventually became unusable on account of a leaking roof. In 2008, the town offices on the lower level moved to another building. Central Hall sat empty and residents faced a choice: demolish an aging behemoth that hadn’t hosted a social function in at least a decade or invest in its restoration.

Deferred maintenance, tight municipal budgets, and dwindling participation in churches and fraternal organizations have left once-vibrant community buildings by the wayside in small towns across Maine. Changes in industry, like the shuttering of 19th-century wool and lumber mills in Dover-Foxcroft, have destabilized economies and forced residents to seek work elsewhere, leaving them with less time to invest in their hometowns, says Brad Miller, preservation manager at the nonprofit Maine Preservation. “When we meet with economic-development folks in rural communities and ask, ‘Where do people primarily work?’ it’s usually like an hour away,” he says. “And so there isn’t the ability for everyone to pitch in at the Masonic lodge to sustain that place.”

A community without a communal gathering spot can feel isolating. “In this area, if you want to go out, you go to a bar,” says Bridgton musician Elizabeth Roth, who found herself constantly searching for other venues to perform and hang out in. In 2020, she opened Bear Mountain Music Hall in an 1844 church turned Grange hall in neighboring Waterford. “I saw it as a place to create community and have a conversation without having to scream,” she says. Following the Grange-hall model, she offers diverse events: ballroom-dancing lessons, author talks, and art classes, in addition to concerts by mostly local musicians. She’s currently working on opening a café in the former schoolhouse that was installed beneath the church in the 1870s. “People are happy to see someone bringing the place back to what it used to be,” she says.

Advertisement

From left: Waterford’s Bear Mountain Music Hall, photo courtesy of Bear Mountain Music Hall; Surry Village School, photographed by James Talala/Alamy

Eclectic programming was also key to the reimagining of the 1872 Surry Village School. In 2016, when resident Gete Thomson learned the town might tear down the vacant Greek Revival and Italianate two-story building where she attended kindergarten, she formed a preservation group to raise the $200,000 needed to restore it and purchase an adjacent lot, where they plan to put in a park. The schoolhouse reopened in 2020 with a sandwich board out front announcing concerts, art shows, bake sales, and bean suppers. After presenting her budget to the town, Thomson says, “I thought, what in the hell have I done? That’s a lot of brownies, yard sales, and begging. But the people wanted it, they have ownership of it, and they appreciate that it’s been saved.”

In Dover-Foxcroft, a group of residents raised nearly $1,800,000 (via donations and capital-funding grants) to gut Central Hall and rebuild it as a modern auditorium that resembles the old one, with the original stage, balcony, and staircases. Reopened in 2019, the building hosts more than 1,000 classes and events per year, from tai chi and contra dancing to art exhibits, concerts, proms, and weddings. “In a small town, initiatives like this have to come from volunteers who are looking ahead,” says Chris Maas, a director at the Dover-Foxcroft Historical Society who spearheaded the Central Hall renovation. “Then, you get the support of the community and you end up with something very different than just saving an old building.”

From our special “Welcome to Small Town, Maine” feature, highlighting some of the challenges and charms of small-town life and people who are passionate about their tight-knit communities. Find a few “Welcome to Small Town, Maine” stories here on the website, and pick up a copy of our March 2024 issue to read them all!

Down East Magazine, March 2024 cover

Get all of our latest stories delivered straight to your mailbox every month. Subscribe to Down East magazine.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Maine

Maine-Endwell boys halt Johnson City streak, take Section 4 Class A basketball title

Published

on

Maine-Endwell boys halt Johnson City streak, take Section 4 Class A basketball title


Maine-Endwell built a seven-point lead with 90 seconds remaining and withstood ninth-ranked Johnson City’s rally to secure a 65-62 win and Section 4’s Class A boys basketball championship Sunday at Visions Veterans Memorial Arena.

Sophomore Preston Ocker – fittingly on this night – scored the final points with seven seconds remaining, and the Spartans denied JC on a three-point attempt just before time expired. The Wildcats had won nine in succession since absorbing a 16-point loss to M-E on Jan. 20.

“We’ve got a bunch of kids who would run their head through a wall if winning is on the other side of it,” said coach Bill Ocker, whose Spartans trailed by eight in the second quarter.

Preston Ocker scored 27 points with five three-point goals and teammate Austyn Nyschot scored 13 to lead Maine-Endwell. Junior guard Zubayr Griffin, cause for at least two NCAA Division I coaches’ attendance, scored 11 of his 26 points in the final quarter. Troeger Lombardini tacked on 14 and Felix Morales 12 for the 19-3 ’Cats.

Advertisement

Maine-Endwell played without senior forward Adam DeSantis as result of injuries he incurred in an automobile accident Friday night. He was present on the Spartans’ sideline but not in uniform.

Up next

Maine-Endwell (12-7) receives an opening-round bye then will oppose the Section 1 or Section 9 champion in a state quarterfinal, March 10 at The Arena.

Frantic final moments

Two points separated the teams before Ocker shot-faked his way into a clearing to bag a three from low on the right wing that put Maine-Endwell ahead by 60-55 with 2:51 to play. Next came a strong finish down the lane by Nyschot and there was that seven-point advantage.

But didn’t JC respond, with Griffin connecting for three from the right wing and Tameem Abdul ’Qahhar scooting better than half the floor for a layup after some sloppy ball handling up top led to a Spartans turnover – which they soon heard about from Coach.

Advertisement

Next, M-E failed on two tries from the line with 28.2 to play, JC turned over the ball with 19 seconds remaining and Luca Konrad hit the first of two free throws for a 63-60 Spartans lead – summarily clipped to a point when Griffin spun to the rim for a goal with 10.2 to play.

With no choice but to foul, JC sent Ocker to the line with seven seconds remaining and the birthday boy cooly nailed both. Griffin twirled into a three-point try from atop the arc, but no go and time expired in an intensely played title game.

Maine-Endwell played the closing 5:26 without big, versatile sophomore Luka Ioannisci, whose fifth foul was assessed for what officials determined to be an illegal screen.

“He’s been kind of the guy who’s carried us offensively the whole year and who has been a rim protecter,” coach Ocker said. “And without Adam in the game either, Noah Gray did a tremendous job around the basket, cleaning things up and being an obstacle down there. That’s a long time without Luka not in the game but the kids gutted it out.”

Advertisement

More from that tough soph guard

Preston Ocker established that he’d be a major factor in this one by scoring 10 points over the first 4½ minutes, squeezing off two successful three-pointers to go with two free throws and a drive for two from the left wing. Nevertheless, it was a 17-12 Johnson City advantage through a quarter, with Griffin’s four field goals – one part of a three-point play – the unsurprising catalyst.

It was a single-point difference at halftime with Ocker producing seven more points in the second quarter, and all-square through three periods with Ocker scoring or setting up his side’s last six points of the third.

Etc., etc.

** Johnson City entered the game ranked ninth by the New York State Sports Writers Association, but immediately tumbled to No. 25 – a spot back of Maine-Endwell.

** Coach Ocker’s message to the fellas in the late going: “We talked about our culture. I feel like our kids deserve to be champions, the way we comport ourselves, the way we go about our business every day. And I told them that games like these are won by tough-minded individuals – and I think we showed that we’ve got a bunch of them.”

Advertisement

** Coach Pop’s thoughts on claiming a championship with Young Ock playing such a prominent role: “It’s awesome. He’s been in pretty much every picture of every team that’s ever won, sitting in front of the group as a 3- or 4-year-old and now out here competing with his friends. Couldn’t ask for a better day.”

** As for defending Griffin, arguably Section 4’s finest offensive player: “He’s a phenomenal talent. We had a guy face-guarding him, a guy doubling him and a guy in the back waiting for him and he still kind of did his thing offensively. He’s just that good.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Maine

3 storms to hit Maine over 6 days as March madness heats up

Published

on

3 storms to hit Maine over 6 days as March madness heats up


The beginning of March in Maine will feature a run for the upper 50s to low 60s for one day, but overall, expect more temps in the 40s and rain on and off the next several days.

We’ve got three storms coming in a six-day period, with rain forming the bulk of the precipitation. But if enough cold air filters in from the north into Thursday, we could see some snow.

There is a storm signal for a large storm come Sunday, but it’s too soon to say if that will happen. I’m more concerned about the king tide and a storm as we get into the weekend. It won’t take much to cause coastal flooding with more than a 13-foot-high tide on Sunday and a flood stage of 12 feet.

The first storm arrives Tuesday, with more than half of an inch of rain spreading across the state from south to north. This storm won’t cause too many issues except for low visibility from fog and slick spots. Don’t expect snow.

Advertisement

A second system moves in later Wednesday into Thursday with rain to start. But cold air will be pouring down from Canada into Thursday. If the storm slows down or tracks inland, there will be plenty of cold air to make an impactful snowstorm. However, an out-to-sea track would mean little to no snow for all of Maine.

The third storm arrives over the weekend – and has the potential to be the most impactful of the three. An inside runner track would pull the storm inland and mean big concerns for coastal communities with a king tide coming. A track along or off the coast could pull the cold air south and throw moisture in the form of snow inland or even down to the coastline.

This storm needs to be watched for trends closely. It has blockbuster potential, but we’ve been fooled before, so just keep an eye on it for now.

No matter what the storms do, there’s one thing that sticks out like a sore thumb this week, and it’s the temperature. We have an opportunity Wednesday to make it to 60 degrees – a rare feat in early March for the Pine Tree State.


Use the form below to reset your password. When you’ve submitted your account email, we will send an email with a reset code.

Advertisement

« Previous

Spring preview brings big warmup, rain and wind to Maine



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending