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Connecticut Medals of Technology to be Awarded to Yale Professor, Danbury Technology Business — Connecticut by the Numbers

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Connecticut Medals of Technology to be Awarded to Yale Professor, Danbury Technology Business — Connecticut by the Numbers


“Dr. Elimelech’s pioneering research has not only enriched the academic community’s understanding of a highly complex topic, but also led to innovative approaches to addressing critical environmental issues and spawned the growth of an industry,” he said. “ARKA’s unparalleled technology expertise is contributing to the success of our nation in a variety of sectors and creating high-skilled jobs that will attract investment to our state and enhance our economy,” Lamont added.

Elimelech’s research and development is in the application of membrane processes including forward osmosis or FO (for desalination and water reuse), high-pressure reverse osmosis or HPRO (for brine concentration and management), and low-salt-rejection reverse osmosis or LSRRO (for brine management and minimal- and zero-liquid discharge applications).

HPRO and LSRRO are expected to revolutionize low-energy, low-cost brine management. Gradiant, a US company specializing in brine management (minimum- and zero-liquid discharge, MLD/ZLD), is commercializing a variant of the LSRRO and FO technologies, which is called Counter Flow RO (CFRO). The current market of brine management is estimated at $11.5B.

Elimelech’s innovative work on forward osmosis (FO) profoundly impacted the desalination and water industry. He was a co-founder of Oasys Water, a company which commercialized the ammonia-carbon dioxide FO desalination technology. More than 13 new FO start-up companies have been formed following his pioneering FO research.

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In a recent breakthrough, Elimelech showed that the solution-diffusion model, which has been used to describe water transport in reverse osmosis (RO) membranes for more than 50 years, is fundamentally flawed and he proposed an alternative mechanism and theory for water transport consistent with experimental observations. This finding has direct implications for the design of high-performance desalination membranes.

In 2021, Elimelech was appointed Sterling Professor of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, the university’s highest academic rank; the first engineering professor at Yale to earn this distinction.

ARKA is a world leader in the design, development, manufacture, integration and test of precision optics, telescopes and electro-optical payload systems for defense, aerospace and scientific applications. ARKA’s mission has grown to include groundbreaking communications, software development, and data processing capabilities, expanding their reach to new areas of innovation.



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Connecticut

Motorcyclist seriously injured on Route 2 off-ramp after striking guardrail, being thrown from bike

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Motorcyclist seriously injured on Route 2 off-ramp after striking guardrail, being thrown from bike


A man was seriously injured when the motorcycle he was operating struck a guardrail and he was thrown from the bike off of Route 2 in East Hartford on Thursday evening.

The driver of the bike, a 35-year-old East Hartford man, was taken in an ambulance to Hartford Hospital following the crash on the Exit 2 off-ramp on Route 2 East shortly before 7 p.m., according to Connecticut State Police.

The man operating a 2001 Suzuki GSF600S in the left lane veered into the left shoulder and struck a metal beam guardrail, state police said. The man was then thrown from the bike and ended up partially in the shoulder and left lane.

The bike settled down in the left lane following the collision and had to be towed.

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State police are still investigating the crash.

Anyone witnesses to the crash or drivers in the area with dashcam footage have been asked to contact Trooper Michael Dean at 860-534-1098 or michael.dean@ct.gov.



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Connecticut Sun stay unbeaten, edge Minnesota Lynx in overtime | TSN

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Connecticut Sun stay unbeaten, edge Minnesota Lynx in overtime | TSN


UNCASVILLE, Conn. — DeWanna Bonner made two free throws with 7.4 seconds left in overtime and the Connecticut Sun ran their season-opening winning streak to four games, overcoming an early 13-point deficit to beat the Minnesota Lynx 83-82 on Thursday night.

Bonner finished with 20 points. Brionna Jones added 19 and Alyssa Thomas had 18 for Connecticut, the only undefeated team in the WNBA.

Napheesa Collier had 31 points and 11 rebounds for Minnesota (2-1). Courtney Williams scored 19 points, Kayla McBride had 13 and Alanna Smith 10.

Rachel Banham pulled the Sun even at 79 with a 3-pointer from the left wing with 40 seconds to play. After Collier made 1 of 2 free throws for Minnesota, Thomas hit a runner in the lane to give Connecticut an 81-80 lead with 17 seconds left. Four seconds later, McBride answered with a jumper from the elbow.

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After Collier fouled Bonner on a shot attempt, Bonner hit the deciding free throws with 7.4 seconds remaining. McBride then missed a potential winning shot, with Bonner grabbing the rebound to secure the victory.



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Connecticut lawmakers looking to crack down on noisy cars

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Connecticut lawmakers looking to crack down on noisy cars


Lawmakers in Connecticut have proposed a new law that would allow police to use sound cameras that can identify noisy cars, snap a photo of the car if the decibel level reaches a certain level, and mail the owner a ticket.

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Congressman Bobby Gibson pushed the legislation calling it a quality-of-life issue for residents in the state who have been complaining about loud noise from exhaust pipes or even deafening stereos.

“I was approached by a lot of constituents who were complaining about the different noise levels in their neighborhoods,” said Gibson. 

Under the new law, municipalities would be able to use automated listening devices, which would catch cars running at volumes over 80 decibels. That’s equivalent to the same level of noise as a vacuum cleaner.

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But, the proposal doesn’t have total support, with some critics saying the tickets would be discriminatory to black and brown communities.

“For somebody who is low-income, that could be a substantial hit to their income, maybe make it impossible for them to pay rent that month or to put food on the table,” said Jay Beeber of the National Motorists Association. 

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Gibson says he is waiting on Governor Ned Lamont to sign the legislation into law. If Lamont does so, then each driver caught by a sound camera would first receive a warning in the mail, and then a up to $250 fine for repeat offenses. 



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