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Bridgeport police say an armed home invasion left two residents injured

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Bridgeport police say an armed home invasion left two residents injured


Bridgeport police say an armed home invasion left two residents injured.

It happened on Connecticut Avenue on Saturday night around 8 p.m.

Police said the robbers took cash and that the incident appears to have been targeted. 

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Police say a 30-year-old man and a 27-year-old woman were injured in the invasion.

Officials said there are two suspects, described as Black males wearing masks.



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Connecticut

Connecticut’s Parent Cabinet seek applicants

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Connecticut’s Parent Cabinet seek applicants


The state’s Parent Cabinet, part of the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood, says it has member positions available.

Officials said the advisory group gives a greater voice and ability in shaping laws and policies that impact young children and families.

A total of 15 members serve on the board and a term is 2 1/2 years.

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Officials said the member positions are compensated.

For more information on the Parent Cabinet and to apply click [ctoec.org/parent-cabinet]here.



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Hamden Town Council deliberates over Gaza ceasefire resolution

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Hamden Town Council deliberates over Gaza ceasefire resolution


Hamden’s Legislative Council may be the latest municipality in Connecticut to pass a nonbinding ceasefire resolution in Gaza.

The council held a public hearing which lasted into the overnight hours Tuesday and went into recess. And while no decision was made, the resolution has proven to be divisive within the town.

Former town councilman Justin Farmer supports the ceasefire and said Hamden residents are indirectly funding Israeli assaults on Gaza, which have killed thousands of civilians.

“It’s a question of what are our taxpayer dollars going to, what is our moral obligation to that,” Farmer said.

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The resolution, which is nonbinding, is largely ceremonial, but advocates say passing one would put pressure on elected officials to support a ceasefire within the federal government which continues to support military aid to Israel.

If Hamden passes a resolution, it would follow the communities of Bridgeport and Windsor, the only two municipalities in the state which have passed ceasefire resolutions.

But opponents, many of them Jewish Americans or Israeli Americans, oppose the resolution due to seeing it as a distraction from town issues or as an antisemitic act.

Hamden Mayor Lauren Garrett, a democrat, has not publicly said if she supports or opposes the resolution.

Dominique Baez, president of the town’s legislative council told CT Public it would take a recess to further discuss the resolution after an at times contentious multi-hour public speaking session.

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Many who spoke at the session, like Benjamin Scolnic, the Rabbi at the Temple Beth Sholom in Hamden, opposed the resolution. Scolnic said a municipal council has little knowledge of foreign affairs, a common view among opponents, and would only pit Hamden residents against each other.

He also struck a conciliatory tone with supporters of the resolution. He said he wants to engage with and understand them.

“You are in pain,” Scolnic said. Let us hear and respect that pain. But you must understand that we are in terrible pain, too,” Scolnic said.

The resolution itself, introduced by councilmember Abdul Osmanu says various actions the Israeli military has taken since the October 7th attacks, could plausibly be considered a genocide, citinga recent U.S. District Courtorder, and the International Court of Justice.

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Eddy Martinez

/

Connecticut Public

Dr. Benjamin Edidin Scolnic speaks in opposition Hamden’s proposed Gaza ceasefire resolution.

But while the language of the resolution also condemns antisemitic acts such as threats made against the Mishkan Israel Synagogue, and Islamophobic and anti-Arab American attacks, the document has been controversial for supporters of Israel.

Some protesters carried banners saying peace is possible if Hamas, which attacked Israel on October 7th, killing at least 1,200 Israelis, surrenders its weapons.

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But the attacks are also part of a long running conflict which intensified after the creation of the state of Israel in 1948 and has led to tit-for-tat killings of Israeli and Palestinian civilians.

Opponents said the resolution does nothing, but at least one supporter, Francesca Maria, a member of the Connecticut Democratic Socialists of America, said doing so sends a message to the president.

“We’re hoping that these local efforts can apply pressure on our federal electeds and the Biden Administration and show them the will of the people and public opinion has turned and that their position is untenable,” Maria said.

Ceasefire supporters throughout the country have previously said they would withhold support for the Democrats in a presidential election year if the administration continues to supply military aid to Israel.

While opponents and supporters spoke and sometimes shouted each other down, other officials have yet to make definite comments. Mayor Garrett issued a carefully worded statement calling for understanding.

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“I believe this is the start, not the end, of an important community conversation,” Garrett said. I am working with a facilitator to bring Faith and Community leaders together to have this essential conversation.”





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Governor Lamont Announces Applications Now Being Accepted for New Members To Serve on the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood's Parent Cabinet

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Governor Lamont Announces Applications Now Being Accepted for New Members To Serve on the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood's Parent Cabinet


Press Releases

02/21/2024

Governor Lamont Announces Applications Now Being Accepted for New Members To Serve on the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood’s Parent Cabinet

(HARTFORD, CT) – Governor Ned Lamont today announced that the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood is now accepting applications for a new cohort of members to serve on its Parent Cabinet.

Established in 2022, the Parent Cabinet is a diverse, parent-led advisory group of 15 members that works directly with the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood and gives parents and caregivers of children from birth to age 5 a greater voice and ability in shaping laws and policies that impact young children and families. The Connecticut Office of Early Childhood is the state agency that oversees child care programs and early childhood services like Birth to Three, Home Visiting, and others.

The Parent Cabinet is open to all who care and raise children in a parenting role, including grandparents, foster parents, and other types of guardians. Members serve 2.5-year terms. The terms of the current members expire either in June 2024 or December 2024, making the membership terms staggered.

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“Our administration is focused on expanding access to child care for families of all backgrounds because these programs help our entire state thrive,” Governor Lamont said. “We need the input of parents in helping to develop the next generation of child care because their voices are valuable in ensuring that Connecticut is the most family-friendly state in the country.”

“States gain getting real world knowledge when partnering with parents,” Early Childhood Commissioner Beth Bye said. “We make decisions that seem logical, but then talk to parents and find out it’s not what they need. You can have the best data in the world, but including parents with lived experience changes expectations and planning based on what families need.”

Members are compensated for their services, must live in Connecticut, and cannot be employed by the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood or otherwise receive funding from the agency. As part of their responsibilities, they spend at least 56 to 68 hours per year on their work. This includes about four to six hours each month:

  • Attending or hosting regional community group meetings or events;
  • Participating in mostly virtual monthly Parent Cabinet meetings and subcommittee meetings; and
  • Meeting quarterly with parent ambassadors from local early childhood collaboratives and the Children’s Collective.

Additionally, members spend about 12 hours each year on:

  • Additional community outreach events;
  • Meeting with local parent ambassadors;
  • Attending additional subcommittee meetings;
  • Attending advisory committee meetings; and
  • Participating in check-ins with staff from the Office of Early Childhood.

Members are asked to:

  • Listen to the needs of families from all backgrounds;
  • Help increase awareness around Office of Early Childhood services and supports, such as Birth to Three, Home Visiting, and Care 4 Kids;
  • Make the voices of families heard on important issues, like improving laws and policies related to the needs of young children and their families; and
  • Partner with local partners and communities.

Members are chosen by a selection committee consisting of an Office of Early Childhood staff member, Parent Cabinet member, and community leader. Applications are evaluated on parent leadership, lived experience, community work, and more. Members are also selected to ensure the panel is geographically balanced across the state and come from diverse backgrounds.

For more information on the Parent Cabinet and its mission, visit ctoec.org/parent-cabinet.

To apply to become a member, visit ctoec.org/parent-cabinet/apply.

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The Office of Early Childhood will host a virtual information session for prospective members on Friday, February 23, 2024, from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 pm. To participate in that session, click here. Another session will be held on March 6, 2024, in the evening.

Twitter: @GovNedLamont
Facebook: Office of Governor Ned Lamont





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