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Rally held in Boston for Israeli-American hostages in Gaza – Boston News, Weather, Sports | WHDH 7News

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Rally held in Boston for Israeli-American hostages in Gaza – Boston News, Weather, Sports | WHDH 7News


BOSTON (WHDH) – Boston ‘Run For Their Lives’ organized an event in Boston Sunday to raise awareness about the Israeli-American hostages who are still being held by Hamas after the Oct. 7 attacks.

The event was aimed at raising awareness, support, and sharing stories of the hostages.

“It is our mission to continue to keep the hostages present and on everybody’s minds,” an organizer said. “So, each week, we honor a different hostage and tell their history, their story, and why their story is important. And then we come together and we walk and we celebrate their life.”

(Copyright (c) 2023 Sunbeam Television. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

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Boston, MA

Bruins win wild one in Edmonton, 6-5, in OT

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Bruins win wild one in Edmonton, 6-5, in OT


The Bruins lost another defenseman, a three-goal lead and then another one-goal third period lead in Edmonton.

But they refused to the lose the game.

After killing a penalty penalty in overtime, Charlie McAvoy beat Stuart Skinner on a terrific backhand goal to lift the B’s to an electric 6-5 win over Edmonton, snapping the Oilers’ eight-game home win streak.

“I just loved the way we kept forging ahead,” coach Jim Montgomery told reporters in Edmonton. “We didn’t worry about what happened, positively or negatively. i thought we continued to play. Obviously, they had a great push by a great team in the third period and it snowballed, but we went right back to work after that. When they made it 4-4, the next four minutes I thought we controlled the game…great for the fans.”

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The B’s managed to beat one of the most explosive teams in the NHL on a night when their goalie, Jeremy Swayman (39 saves), was not at his best. But on an overtime penalty kill, Swayman came up with a huge glove save on Leon Draisaitl to give McAvoy the opportunity to win another game. This time he didn’t wait till the ninth round of the shootout like he did on Monday against Dallas, taking a Jake DeBrusk pass and going straight down the slot, toe-dragging it and beating Skinner on the backhander at 3:10 of OT.

Montgomery decided to break up his rotation and play Swayman in back-to-back games, partially to go with the hot hand. But he also did it with Linus Ullmark’s spectacular game in Calgary last season in mind. The B’s play the Flames on Thursday.

“(Swayman’s) game was kind of like our team’s game. Things are going really well, then they go not the way you want it,” said Montgomery. “His mental makeup is unreal. He just thinks he’s going to stop every puck, so he doesn’t worry about what just happened. He moves forward. That’s why he’s able to keep making saves.”

Rookie Mason Lohrei, recalled from Providence, stepped up to the occasion, recording three assists and four blocks in 23:32 of icetime.

“He was really good,” said Montgomery. “He played more direct, north, coming out the D-zone and at the offensive blue line under pressure. And then when he had time and space, I thought he was really good. Thought he was good on the power play as well.”

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It was an eventful, crazy game from the first puck drop.

The first period started out very badly, then very well. Just 1:05 into the game, Ryan McLeod gave Matt Grzelcyk a two-handed chop on the top of his left foot, earning a tripping call. Grzelcyk needed help off the ice as he could not put any weight on the foot. He would surprisingly return to the bench late in the period but did not play again. That was not welcome news, considering they were already without Hampus Lindholm for the trip and possibly longer. While Lindholm is out “week-to-week,” Montgomery termed Grzelcyk as “day-to-day right now.”

On the power play, the B’s looked crisp as the first unit whipped the puck around with precision. But it was the second unit that found the back of the net. Morgan Geekie (a career-high 10 goals) scored from the outside of the right circle, thanks to a Jake DeBrusk screen.

But in the fast-paced first, the Oilers eventually got rolling and tied it up at 11:40. The struggling Derek Forbort lost the puck as he tried to break it out as Connor McDavid flicked it off his stick. It went to Warren Foegele, who took it to the net and beat Swayman through the pads.

The B’s survived an Anthony Richard trip on McDavid and then pushed back. They held a 14-12 shot advantage in the first, but could not get another by Stuart Skinner.

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But Brad Marchand gave the B’s their one-goal lead back just 25 seconds into second. Danton Heinen gave Marchand a nifty little pass just outside the blue line to give the captain a little bit of room to attack. From the outside of the left circle, Marchand found the sizable hole Skinner left on his short side for his 26th goal.

The B’s made it a two-goal lead at 4:40 with another fourth (third?) line goal. From the right point, McAvoy gave a short pass to Jesper Boqvist just below him. Boqvist flipped the puck toward the net and, with Justin Brazeau screening in front, Trent Frederic (16) tipped it past Skinner.

Veteran Corey Perry tried to get his team into the game by taking a run at McAvoy and missed, but Parker Wotherspoon caught the attempt and had words with Perry. Perry started throwing hands immediately and Wotherspoon had to oblige, landing some good shots and getting the W. Perry got the extra two, but the B’s could not cash in.

But after killing off another Edmonton power play, the B’s extended the lead to 4-1. At the end of a terrific shift by the B’s first line, Jake DeBrusk backhanded home a rebound of a David Pastrnak shot at 13:57. It was his 13th and first in 10 games.

They would not run away with it, however. The Oilers got one back just 90 seconds later when Zach Hyman won a puck battle along the boards and fed a wide-open Foegele in front of the net for his second of the game on backhander.

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The B’s were lucky to get out of the period with a two-goal lead. Edmonton kept them hemmed in their own end for the better part of the final four minutes of the period. Mason Lohrei, who had three assists, was on the ice for the final 3:46. But the B’s were able to survive and catch their breath.

Then after Swayman allowed a bad goal at 6:14 of the third, the Oilers were with striking distance. The netminder tried to clear the puck himself along the wall but it was stopped by Cody Ceci at the right point. Ceci fired a shot that looked like an easy save for Swayman, but it somehow squeezed through and behind him. Mattias Janmark just tapped it in for the easy one.

It was all tied up 1:10 later. A Darnell Nurse left point shot produced a fat rebound and Perry lifted it over Swayman’s pad for the equalizer.

“Our bench was really calm, even though it looked like we were in an avalanche for a while,” said Montgomery.

The B’s regained the lead but couldn’t maintain it. After a nice play by Lohrei to keep the puck in and drop it for Pastrnak, the sharpshooter whistled a shortside wrister past Skinner at 12:41.

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But Swayman’s rebound control issues continued. The Oilers tied it up just 38 seconds later when he couldn’t control Mattias Ekholm’s long distance shot and Zach Hyman tucked the rebound underneath the netminder.

The B’s looked like they would be able to run out the clock to get it to overtime and they did, but not without shooting themselves in the foot. After overskating a puck at his own blue line, James van Riemsdyk took a tripping penalty with 20 seconds in regulation.

They managed to kill it in OT and then van Riemsdyk was a stopped on a breakaway coming out of the box.

But for the second time in as many games, McAvoy was the hero.



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Boston, pro soccer team sued over White Stadium redevelopment

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Boston, pro soccer team sued over White Stadium redevelopment


Neighbors and park advocates have filed a lawsuit against the city and a professional women’s soccer team planning to restore and use Franklin Park’s White Stadium, stating that such a use would unconstitutionally privatize the land.

Mayor Michelle Wu pushed back on that claim, however, stating that any attempts to paint the redevelopment project as a privatization of White Stadium was “either a misunderstanding or a misrepresentation.”

In a lawsuit filed Tuesday in Suffolk Superior Court, the plaintiffs also allege that redevelopment plans would largely displace Boston Public School student-athletes and community members who regularly use the park and stadium, and were made hastily by the city and Boston Unity Soccer Partners without public input.

“We have heard from many members of the community who are deeply concerned about the proposal by Boston Unity Soccer Partners to redevelop and privatize White Stadium and 1.5 acres of surrounding public parkland in order to support the unique needs of a profit-driven professional sports team,” Karen Mauney-Brodek, president of the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, said on a Wednesday press call.

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Mauney-Brodek said the Emerald Necklace Conservancy, a nonprofit park advocacy group joined by 15 city residents in filing the lawsuit, “shares their concerns over the unconstitutional privatization of public land.”

“We support the renovation of White Stadium and Franklin Park, but we do not support the required involvement of a professional sports team that would displace the local community for the next 30 years while privatizing and profiting from this public resource,” she said. “This major redevelopment is being fast-tracked without adequate community input or proper environmental review.”

In filing the lawsuit, Mauney-Brodek said, the plaintiffs are “asking the city to slow down and respect the public process.”

The 22-page court filing lays out a number of grievances with the plan, which, according to the plaintiffs, calls for White Stadium to be reserved exclusively for use by the new professional women’s soccer team for 20 weekend days from April to November, roughly 77% of Saturdays during the warmer months.

The lawsuit also states that the pitch will be reserved as pro soccer practice sessions for 20 Friday evenings, and that Boston Public School football games traditionally held at the stadium will be displaced.

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It also alleges several legal violations on the city and state level.

The project, according to the lawsuit, would “illegally transfer the public trust lands” held by the beneficiaries of the White Fund Trust “to private parties, ensuring extensive, exclusive use” of those lands by a private party for the operation of a professional sports team.

The city has “failed to consider any alternatives to the project,” the lawsuit states, “all while rapidly ignoring the terms of the White Fund Trust and the requirements of Article 97,” which requires two-thirds approval from the state Legislature for other uses for land or easements taken or acquired for conservation purposes.

It also lists concerns with how the project was handled in city zoning review.

Mayor Wu pushed back on those claims, which included making a point to dispute assertions of privatization, stating, “To say that this would be privatizing White Stadium is either a misunderstanding or a misrepresentation.”

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“It’s true that if this were any other park we couldn’t just build a stadium out of nowhere without any special process for that,” Wu told reporters at an unrelated event on Wednesday. “But this is an existing stadium. It’s been used by and dedicated to Boston Public School student-athletes. It will continue to be used that way so these legal claims are without merit.”

Renovations at the dilapidated park and stadium — where half of the grandstands are burned out from a recent fire — would triple the number of hours the stadium could be used, 90% of which would be dedicated to Boston Public School student-athletes and the community, the mayor said.

According to the lawsuit, Boston Unity will contribute $30 million and the city will put in roughly $50 million.

“I’m really excited about the opportunity this represents, bringing in a pro team, to help invest in and renovate an existing stadium,” Wu said.

Boston Unity Soccer Partners, an all-female ownership group, was the only respondent to the city’s request for proposals for White Stadium and won an expansion bid in September to become the National Women’s Soccer League’s 15th team.

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It plans to start playing at the renovated stadium in the spring of 2026. Boston Unity pointed to its efforts to include the community in the restoration process, and emphasized its commitment to diversity and inclusion.

About 95% of the team will be invested by women and 40% by people of color, Boston Globe CEO Linda Pizzuti Henry is one of the investors. Boston Unity has said that construction, which includes adding 1,000 seats to the 10,000-seat stadium, would generate 500 jobs and that 300 jobs will be created permanently.

“Community collaboration is a core value of Boston Unity Soccer Partners because sports teams and stadiums by their very nature are community assets,” Boston Unity said in a statement, adding that it plans to continue that comprehensive engagement process to listen, address concerns and ensure input is reflected.

“Together we will continue this process to realize our shared vision to develop a beautiful facility that positively impacts the neighborhoods around Franklin Park, provides opportunities for Boston Public School student-athletes and greater access for surrounding communities,” the statement said.



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No, Boston’s food scene isn’t just bowls. But there are some tasty ones.

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No, Boston’s food scene isn’t just bowls. But there are some tasty ones.


Readers Say

After an opinion piece in The Guardian called out Boston for having too many bowl options, we asked readers if they thought that was accurate.

“The Fool” at the Life Alive cafe in Salem, Mass. John Blanding/Boston Globe

One word typically comes to mind when thinking of Boston’s cuisine: Seafood, and lots of it, either in the form of lobster on a buttered bun, or clams in piping hot chowder, or a platter of oysters waiting to be slurped down. But those who live here really know that Boston’s food scene goes beyond that, with diverse foods centering our 23 vibrant neighborhoods. 

Does that include bowls? According to one recent visitor from Europe, who happens to be a columnist for The Guardian, she noted that Boston was swimming in bowls, and she was baffled.

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To be fair, bowls can include bibimbap, taco bowls, or bento boxes, which have heavily influenced menu items at popular chains that offer bowls. But the bowls it seemed this writer was arguing against were the ones from fast-casual chains such as Cava, Sweetgreen, and Chipotle or similar locally-owned, health conscious lunch spots. 

We asked Boston.com readers if this was a fair assessment to say that Boston has too many bowl options. But we were also curious where people were eating bowls that weren’t “spookily soulless,” as writer Emma Beddington described her “not Sweetgreen but similar” lunch.

Most of the more than 100 readers who responded to our form (71%) were rather puzzled by this writer’s observation of Boston’s food scene, but that doesn’t mean you don’t love a bowl. Some readers gave their non-salad recommendations.

But other readers thought that maybe this writer was onto something — the bowls have taken over Boston. We heard from a few readers who said yes, but still put preferences down between the big 3 (Cava, Sweetgreen, and Chipotle), but most of the yays offered no bowl suggestions.

Some respondents came out to defend the bowls, either because they taste great, or because they’re one of the only foods some with dietary restrictions or gastrointestinal health issues can find.

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Is Boston cuisine too bowl-centric?

Yes, what’s with all the bowls?

No, that’s crazy, there’s tons of other options

No, there are tons of other options

“The bowls don’t look so different from bento boxes. Is writer Emma Beddington for The Guardian going to pick on Tokyo next after Boston?” – Fred, Derry

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“Pho Le Vermicelli” – Philip W., Boston

“The French Onion Uncommon Ramen from Bone & Bread at Widowmaker Taprooom & Kitchen is unreal!  Since they opened I stop in weekly. I love adding the pork belly as well! (A) must try, nothing like it. Give me all the bowls!” – Bobby V., Allston

“Bibimbap (from) Misono in Chestnut Hill. Very affordable (chicken bulgogi only $18.95), a lot of food, tasty, (and) rice is always crispy on the hot stone bowl. It is rarely crowded for such a great restaurant, most likely because it is in a strip mall off the VFW.” – Tim O., West Roxbury

And even though most of you said Boston was not overwhelmed with bowls, you still love the convenience and choice at the bowl restaurants that were clearly the target of Beddington’s opinion piece. 

“The Roasted Mushroom, Spinach and Potato bowl from Tatte. Where? Just look out the window. There’s probably one there.” – Michele, Needham

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“Greek Vegetable Chicken Farro Bowl from Pressed Cafe.” – Dawn, Malden

“Pretty much anything from Sweetgreen. I particularly love the crispy rice bowl or the harvest bowl with modifications, of course! I have tried bowls from most of the local downtown places.” – Dawn A., Brockton

“An acai bowl from Sol Bean in Middleton, MA.” – Jocelyn N., Peabody

Yes, what’s with all the bowls?

“It all looks like slop to me. Bowls are for soups (and) stews in my book. So, I agree with the nice British lady.” – Bill B., Newton

Not yes, not no, but in defense of bowls

“Bowls suck. Low FODMap restrictions sucks. There is no ‘favorite’ regarding anything involving food right now; rather, what makes me feel physically terrible or physically OK.” – Chelsea, Charlestown

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“Our bowls in the Boston area come in so many flavors. They are mostly plant-first and healthy as heck. I also love (the) bowls just recently introduced by Clover Food Lab.  They’re all wonderful.” – Nina, Cambridge





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