Connect with us

Boston, MA

Boston Chef Valentine Howell Jr. to Compete on ‘Top Chef’ This Year

Published

on

Boston Chef Valentine Howell Jr. to Compete on ‘Top Chef’ This Year


The contestant lineup for the latest season of Top Chef is here, and there’s a familiar face among the crowd: Valentine Howell Jr., the former executive chef at Greek hot spot Krasi, the owner of taco pop-up Black Cat, and a finalist for the James Beard Award for Best Chef: Northeast in 2023, will be competing on Top Chef: Wisconsin. He joins a pool of 14 other candidates vying for a $250,000 grand prize this year. There’s another Boston name on the other side of the judges’ table, too. Kristen Kish, who formerly worked within Barbara Lynch’s restaurant empire and competed and won Top Chef in 2012, joined the cast after longtime host Padma Lakshmi left the show last year. The newest season premieres on Wednesday, March 20 at 9 p.m. on Bravo, with next-day streaming on Peacock.

The North End’s first Black female bartender reflects on her career

Marsha Lindsey, a hospitality veteran who is currently the principal bartender at Italian restaurant SRV in the South End, reflected in an interview with the Boston Globe about her years spent building her bartending career in Boston — including being the first Black woman to bartend in the North End — and what Boston’s restaurant industry could do better. “I think Boston’s really good at opening up spaces for people to eat, to come to convene, to enjoy each other, to catch a vibe. I think that Boston’s not so good at inclusivity,” Lindsey tells the Globe. “I think that there’s way more room to grow when it comes to having people of color in the front of the house.”

Seafood mainstay Saltie Girl reopens with a new look

After a month-long partial closure, chic seafood restaurant Saltie Girl in Back Bay has reopened with some dining room updates — and new menu items — to show off. The restaurant, which is housed in a townhouse at the corner of Newbury Street and Dartmouth Street, now boasts a swanky, yacht-themed captain’s room to dine in, among other interior upgrades. The menu, helmed by chef Kyle McClelland, now includes new dishes like a yellowtail crudo with citrus fruits, pickled ramps, and trout roe, a tuna carpaccio with pistachios and fried capers, and a dover sole, plus one old favorite from the vault: torched salmon belly with a miso glaze served over rice.

…and over in the Seaport, Committee debuts some changes, too

Greek bar and restaurant Committee has welcomed back Luis Figueroa, a chef on the restaurant’s opening team back in 2015, as the spot’s new executive chef. Figueroa has already been at work revamping the menu, which now includes new dinner plates like lamb frites and shrimp saganaki, with shrimp bathed in tomato sauce, garlic, lemon, and feta, as well as a weekday lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. with build-your-own salads on the menu.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Boston, MA

OBF: NFLPA grades put Pats between ‘Animal House’ and outhouse

Published

on

OBF: NFLPA grades put Pats between ‘Animal House’ and outhouse


The Patriots’ final 2023-24 grades came on Wednesday.

Delta House would be ashamed.

Patriots Owner Robert “Hoover” Kraft: “D+”

Former Coach Bill “Otter” Belichick: “B-minus”

Advertisement

Meanwhile, “Treatment Of Families” pulled a Blutarsky.

“Zero-point-zero.”

An F-minus

Jonathan “D-Day” Kraft had no grade point average.

All courses incomplete.

Advertisement

These ratings came via the NFLPA’s annual team-by-team survey.

This is what the players think.

Overall, the Patriots are ranked 29th by the players association in 11 different categories.

Their team GPA is 1.71 on a 4.0 scale.

That’s a “D+.”

Advertisement

The Patriot Way is on double-secret probation.

“We’re a region that stresses family values,” Robert Kraft said 30 years ago on the day when he bought the Patriots.

The Patriots have become a franchise that literally cannot treat player families any worse.

“Family Values” have gone the way of “The Dynasty,”

When it comes to “The Dynasty,” Patriots fans are still wrangling with the various stages of grief.

Advertisement

The denial thing took about 5 years, but the bargaining phase shows no end date.

Talk of “The Dynasty” here is not limited to the current serialization of Jeff Benedict’s book currently airing in parts on Apple TV+.

We view “The Dynasty” as the entire three decades of Patriots decadence going back to the days when Robert Kraft made James Orthwein an offer he couldn’t refuse.

“The Dynasty” on Apple TV+ sits as a milestone between “Olympia,” “Why We Fight,” and the “NESN Red Sox Post Game Show” in terms of State Run Media propaganda.

While the reel-life “Dynasty” Patriots are streaming on your favorite big-screen of choice, the real-life Patriots seek their new post-Dynasty identity this week at the NFL combine in Indianapolis.

Advertisement

Eliot Wolf spoke to the world for the first time in his new role as Patriots GM-In-Everything-But-Name-Only Tuesday.

Wolf, 41, is the son of former Packers GM Ron Wolf. He followed dad’s footsteps and worked in Green Bay for 14 years.

And he is bringing the Packer Way to Foxboro.

“Cheese!”

Wolf wasn’t sheepish when it came to stating his priorities. He made it clear the days of “a hard-ass vibe” in New England have gone the way of straight A’s in Foxboro.

Advertisement

Wolf promised a new way to evaluate players, especially quarterbacks.

It appears he’s already given Mac the knife.

“You don’t want a guy that’s throwing his hands up after a bad play or you can see him physically pointing at somebody. Body language is important. Everybody’s looking to the quarterback,” Wolf said.

Declarative sentences.

Action verbs.

Advertisement

Cogent answers.

Welcome to 2024.

So much BS has gone the way of “B-minus B.”

The most important thing Wolf said was that he has the final say in deciding what to do with the No. 3 pick in April’s NFL draft. The finger of blame or success points in his direction.

This may be the first time since Kraft told Bill Parcells to draft Terry Glenn that we have definitive proof in terms of who makes the final call on draft day.

Advertisement

The Narrative says Kraft forced Belichick to draft Mac Jones in 2020. The truth is that assertion never surfaced after Jones’ strong rookie season.

In “The Dynasty,” Kraft is shown at the table when the team chooses Brady.

“Did Bob take Tom, too?”

Episodes 5 and 6 of “The Dynasty” drop late Thursday/early Friday depending on the time zone of your server.

But much is amiss.

Advertisement

Mike Martz and Michael Strahan are given more airtime than the 2003-2004 back-to-back Super Bowl winning seasons. Never mind Adam Vinatieri.

Vinatieri is the greatest clutch player in the history of Boston sports. In addition to his wizardry in the Snow Bowl, he provided the margin of victory in New England’s first three Super Bowl wins.

And when AI is doing its best to scrub any mentions of male NHL players from the internet, “The Dynasty” conveniently has yet to mention Kraft’s dalliance with the State of Connecticut.

The Narrative says the NFL would never let the Patriots leave the Boston Metro Area at the turn of the century. But in truth, the league could do nothing to stop a move to Hartford. (See: Browns, Cleveland). Rather the NFL worked behind the scenes to keep the team from leaving Massachusetts. A subtle but important difference.

The Nov. 19, 1998, front page “PATRIOTS EXTRA” of Hartford Courant was emblazoned with the headline “Touchdown!” Kraft was pictured with then Gov. John Rowland.

Advertisement

The Nutmeg State would open its wallet to give the franchise whatever it wanted to move to a stadium alongside the Connecticut River in Harford. The deal would have been the most lucrative, if not ludicrous, in NFL history.

Problems with the Hartford Steam Plant site doomed the project. The NFL got lucky.

Had the sides opted for a cleaner site across the river in East Hartford, Tom Brady may be Connecticut favorite’s son. The Hartford Heartthrob. The Middlebury Missile. The Torrington Tornado.

The “charade” lasted for months. The Patriots were moving to Connecticut … unless.

When the Connecticut deal was announced, Kraft spoke with the same emotion as he does in “The Dynasty” when discussing Super Bowl 36 and 9/11. Kraft and son Jonathan participated in a Hartford pep rally on the same day when his dad got a key to the city.

Advertisement

The deal would guarantee the Patriots a new stadium by 2002. Kraft terminated it on April 30, 1999, two days before an opt-out deadline.

The Patriots got their “unless” in the form of that $70 million in Bay State taxpayer money to cover infrastructure improvements around Gillette Stadium. That equals $129.5 million today. The Krafts also earned the everlasting gratitude of would-be NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, who worked backchannels around Beacon Hill.

That chit came in handy when it came time to smash the “Spygate” tapes.

The Krafts may need a sequel to “The Dynasty” to clean up this current mess and raise that GPA.

“Hard Knocks” is just five months away.

Advertisement

Bill Speros (@RealOBF and @BillSperos) can be reached at bsperos1@gmail.com.



Source link

Continue Reading

Boston, MA

Gamethread: UVA vs Boston College Men’s Basketball

Published

on

Gamethread: UVA vs Boston College Men’s Basketball


Boston College returns home from its road trip to take on the Virginia Cavaliers tonight. Despite the Eagles’ rough week on the road, losing at both FSU and NC State, and despite the Hoos being ranked as recently as a week and a half ago, Boston College is a -1.5 favorite. Tune in at 9pm for coverage!

Who: Virginia Cavaliers (20-8, 11-6 ACC) vs. Boston College Eagles (15-12, 6-10 ACC)

Where: Conte Forum, Chestnut Hill, MA

When: Wednesday, February 28th

Advertisement

Tip-Off Time: 9pm ET

How to Watch: Today’s game will be streamed and broadcasted live on ESPN U

How to Follow: Follow the game on X (Twitter) by checking in with our live coverage at @bcinterruption





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Boston, MA

Boston is going is going big on installing curbside EV chargers

Published

on

Boston is going is going big on installing curbside EV chargers


Boston is EV-friendly, but it needs more accessible chargers, so it’s going to install hundreds of public curbside EV chargers.

Boston’s “Recharge Boston: Boston’s Zero Emission Vehicle Program,” has a goal of every household being within a 10 minute walk of a public EV charging station or EV car share, so installing 250 curbside EV chargers is part of that program.

Many EV chargers in the Massachusetts city are currently located at condos, hotels, public garages, high rises, and shopping centers. The chargers are publicly accessible but they’re not free to access. That means you have to pay a parking garage or entrance fee. This program aims to change that. (I’ve had to use my credit card to get into a parking garage in Boston to fast charge, and it’s a real pain.)

Advertisement

The companies the city chose to install the curbside EV chargers are Brooklyn-based Itselectric and Jersey City, NJ-based Greenspot, according to the Boston Globe, whose sources spoke to the news outlet anonymously because contracts aren’t yet finalized. Once the contracts are approved, they’ll run for 10 years.

Itselectric installs Level 2 charger posts that get their power from nearby private buildings who make passive income from partnering with Itselectric. When EV drivers sign up with Itselectric, they’re sent a portable EV charger that’s registered to the driver’s account. They can then plug and charge at any Itselectric charger in Boston and beyond.

Greenspot, which specializes in EV charging for “multifamily living,” also shares revenue with building owners. It installs both Level 2 and DC fast chargers with built-in cables.

This business model means the city doesn’t have to pay for the curbside EV chargers.

Eric Bourassa, transportation director of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, told the Globe that “Boston’s experience will test whether the market can support private sector companies trying to make a profit from charging”:

Advertisement

We are still in the early days of figuring out the right business model. Cities need to test and see how these things work.

The EV chargers will be installed around the city in the next two years. Locations of the curbside chargers are TBD, as the EV charger companies will now work with the city on choosing sites. Residents have been making requests for EV chargers for the last few years, and that will be heavily considered. Price-wise, Boston will have to approve the rates that the companies set.

Read more: The City of Boston itself is also installing 60 EV chargers at 15 city-owned sites.


To limit power outages and make your home more resilient, consider going solar with a battery storage system. In order to find a trusted, reliable solar installer near you that offers competitive pricing, check out EnergySage, a free service that makes it easy for you to go solar. They have hundreds of pre-vetted solar installers competing for your business, ensuring you get high quality solutions and save 20-30% compared to going it alone. Plus, it’s free to use and you won’t get sales calls until you select an installer and you share your phone number with them.

Your personalized solar quotes are easy to compare online and you’ll get access to unbiased Energy Advisers to help you every step of the way. Get started here. – ad*

FTC: We use income earning auto affiliate links. More.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending