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These WI Cities Could Be Ghost Towns By 2100: New Study

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These WI Cities Could Be Ghost Towns By 2100: New Study


WISCONSIN — Thousands of U.S. cities, including some in Wisconsin, are in danger of becoming ghost towns by 2100 due to a multitude of issues, ranging from the decline of industry to lower birth rates to the impacts of climate change, according to a study published recently in the journal Nature Cities.

These and other factors could cause further erosion in the populations of about 15,000 cities nationwide — in every state but Hawaii and the District of Columbia — making them virtual ghost towns with only a fraction of the population they previously had, according to the study.

Overall, the researchers from the University of Illinois Chicago found that population projections for 2100 suggest that nearly half of 30,000 cities nationwide could experience population losses of between 12 percent to 23 percent, and in 27 percent to 44 percent of the populated area.

In Wisconsin, the study said areas around Milwaukee, Green Bay, Wausau, and Superior could all see massive population drops.

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But the Madison area will likely see increases.

Depopulation creates enormous, unprecedented challenges for planners, including possible disruptions in basic services like transit, clean water, electricity and internet access, the authors wrote.

Urban planning now is based on growth, but nearly half of U.S. cities are depopulating, senior author Sybil Derrible, an urban engineer at the University of Illinois Chicago, told Scientific American.

“The takeaway is that we need to shift away from growth-based planning, which is going to require an enormous cultural shift in the planning and engineering of cities,” Derrible said.

The authors said the exit from cities for the suburbs creates additional strain and possibly limits “access to much-needed resources in depopulating areas, further exacerbating their challenges.”

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Also, they added, immigration could play a vital role in reversing the trend, but also that “resource distribution challenges will persist unless a paradigm shift happens away from growth-based planning alone.”

The Northeast and Midwest are the most likely regions to see big population losses, with Vermont and West Virginia the hardest hit, with 80 percent of cities between the two states expected to shrink.

Five states — Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Mississippi and New Hampshire — could see population declines in about three-fourths of their cities, according to the study.

Around 40 percent of cities are growing, including New York City, Chicago, Phoenix and Houston. Most of the places projected to see population growth by 2100 are located in the South and West, according to the study.

Most previous studies were based on big cities like Chicago, New York and Los Angeles, “but that doesn’t give us an estimation of the scale of the problem,” lead study author Uttara Sutradhar, a doctoral candidate in civil engineering at the University of Illinois Chicago, told the Scientific American.

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The study was based on U.S. Census data from 2000 to 2020, data from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey and five future climate scenarios, called the Shared Socioeconomic Pathways. That model shows different ways demographics, society and economics could change by 2100, depending on how much global warming the world experiences, according to Scientific American



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Wisconsin

City by City: Hibbing, Mountain Iron, NW Wisconsin

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City by City: Hibbing, Mountain Iron, NW Wisconsin


Hibbing, MN- The City of Hibbing and Essentia Health are teaming up to launch a new community survey. The survey just opened and asks residents to provide feedback and share their experience with the town’s walkability. The survey will also allow residents a chance to contribute to the development of future landscaping and opportunities. It’s available online and can also be done in person at the library.

Mt Iron, MN- The Spring Gardening Spectacular will be held on March 28. Hosted by St. Louis County Extension the event features stations and speakers on all things gardening. Topics this year include growing cut flowers, soil testing and how to grow a variety of fruits and vegetables. Those who register before February 25 will get early bird pricing. The event will be held in Mountain Iron at the community center starting at 9 a.m.

Northwest Wisconsin- Representative Tom Tiffany announced his district office is taking submissions for the 2024 Congressional Art Competition. All students in the 7th congressional district are welcome to submit their work. This year’s theme is “A Day in the Life of Wisconsin”. Entries can be mailed or hand-delivered to his office in Wausau. Work is due April 5. The chosen work will hang in the U.S. Capitol building.

Tips: If there’s something going on in your neighborhood that you think we should know about, send us an email at CitybyCity@NorthernNewsNow.com, and it might be featured as we go around the Northland City by City.

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Previous Day: City by City: Wisconsin, Duluth, Copper Harbor



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Wisconsin Potawatomi leader calls for bipartisanship in State of Tribes speech

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Wisconsin Potawatomi leader calls for bipartisanship in State of Tribes speech


MADISON, Wis. (AP) – The leader of the Forest County Potawatomi tribe on Thursday called on Wisconsin lawmakers and other state leaders to search for bipartisan solutions to problems including human trafficking and affordable housing.

James Crawford, chair of the Potawatomi, delivered the annual State of the Tribes address in the Assembly chamber. In addition to Assembly members, other attendees included leaders from the state’s 11 other federally recognized tribes, state senators, Wisconsin Supreme Court justices, Attorney General Josh Kaul and Secretary of State Sarah Godlewski.

“Despite our differences, Wisconsin’s tribes and our states leaders can and must continue to collaborate and work together for the greater good,” Crawford said.

He thanked lawmakers for working to increase Medicaid reimbursements for tribes, ensure access to indigenous foods, and pass bills designed to increase affordable housing and make foster care more attractive and affordable.

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“There is still much more than needs to be done,” Crawford said. “Find the time to set aside your differences and not be afraid to reach across the aisle.”

He specifically called on the Legislature to do more to address the problem of human trafficking in tribal communities, while thanking Kaul for forming a task force on the issue.

(Copyright 2024 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.)



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Wisconsin coach Greg Gard lobbies for mentor Bo Ryan to get into the Naismith Hall of Fame: ‘It’s a no-brainer’

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Wisconsin coach Greg Gard lobbies for mentor Bo Ryan to get into the Naismith Hall of Fame: ‘It’s a no-brainer’


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MADISON – Greg Gard chuckled before he could attempt to respond to the question:

How would you state your case for Bo Ryan to be voted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame?

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“I mean, it’s a no-brainer,” the Wisconsin coach said. “You look at the numbers.”

Gard, who worked under Ryan for more than two decades – at UW-Platteville, UW-Milwaukee and finally at Wisconsin – probably can recite many of the numbers from memory.

“Platteville alone,” Gard continued, “and I was there for six of those (seasons).

“The further you get from it you realize those may never be duplicated. They were video game numbers.”

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Tom Izzo of Michigan State among those pushing for Bo Ryan to join the Naismith Hall of Fame

Gard and other coaches, including Tom Izzo of Michigan State, have been quietly pushing for Ryan, 76, to be inducted.

“Tom obviously recognizes the validity of Bo being in,” Gard said. “And I know Tom has been a proponent and a voice to help with this, as have others.

“I think for those that really understand it and know the history and step back and really look at it, it’s a no-brainer.”

Ryan moved one step closer last week when he was named among the 14 finalists for the 2024 class.

“Yes, we have been very vocal,” Gard said. “Probably more than ever and consistently more than ever.

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“I think I’ve been able to talk to a lot of people that have given me insight how to keep that at the forefront.”

Ryan’s résumé is in the hands of the North American Honors Committee. That committee includes 24 voting members and is composed of Hall of Famers, basketball executives and administrators, members of the media and other experts in the game of basketball.

A finalist must receive at least 18 votes to be enshrined in the Hall of Fame.

The class is to be announced April 6, during the Division I men’s Final Four in Arizona.

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“We’ve got to make another push now,” Gard said. “I know he needs 18 votes, so we’ll continue to push that forward and hopefully by April 6 when they announce the inductees that he is one of them.”

Bo Ryan’s résumé boasts impressive numbers

In case anyone has forgotten the impressive résumé Ryan compiled in 31-plus college seasons, here are some snippets:

His overall record was 747-233, a winning percentage of .762.

His teams qualified for the national tournament – NAIA, NCAA Division III or NCAA Division I – in all but four seasons, twice at UW-Platteville and twice at UW-Milwaukee.

He led Platteville to Division III national titles in 1991, 1995, 1998 and 1999 and those teams finished a combined 119-5 (.960).

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Platteville was the winningest NCAA men’s basketball program of the 1990s regardless of division with a record of 266-26 (.908).

Ryan guided UW to 14 NCAA berths in 14 seasons and reached the Final Four in his last two full seasons. UW never finished outside the top four of the Big Ten during that run.

“We can sit here because we’re biased and say it’s a no-brainer,” Gard said. “But when you step back and really look at the numbers and the consistency of it, there’s no doubt it’s Hall of Fame worthy.”

Gard and his players were in Iowa City preparing to face the Hawkeyes when the finalists for the 2024 class were announced.

Gard called Ryan to chat.

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“He did not know,” Gard said. “So, he was a little speechless. Which was good. It’s rare you find him speechless.”

Will the next time come in April?



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