Connect with us

South Dakota

Annual American Legion Ride 605

Published

on

Annual American Legion Ride 605


SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (Dakota News Now) – A four-day motorcycle ride made its way through Sioux Falls Sunday benefitting South Dakota veterans, and more.

The South Dakota American Legion Ride 605 is a fundraiser for the American Legion Foundation.

The ride features 12 different posts presenting checks to the riders along their journey, and it got underway yesterday morning at Capital Lake in Pierre.

Donations go towards Veterans Affairs and rehabilitation– as well as youth programs.

Advertisement

The ride also includes stops at small-town veteran memorials– the legion riders set out with a goal of raising 5-thousand dollars.



Source link

South Dakota

As SDSU aims for top-tier research designation, South Dakota poised to reap benefits

Published

on

As SDSU aims for top-tier research designation, South Dakota poised to reap benefits


This paid piece is sponsored by South Dakota State University.

Iowa native Kennedy Roland grew up more than five hours from Brookings but chose to attend South Dakota State University as an undergraduate “on a leap of faith” after college visits were canceled during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“South Dakota State checked all my boxes; it is a midsized university and allowed me to attend college out of state at an in-state price,” she said.

Four years later, Roland again found herself faced with figuring out her next move. She earned an undergraduate degree in biology but wasn’t sure about graduate school.

Advertisement

“I never wanted to pursue a Ph.D.,” she added. “However, I wanted to be part of this program in particular.”

So Roland is staying at SDSU. She’s pairing a passion for teaching that she discovered through coaching gymnastics with her enjoyment of human anatomy and roles as a tutor and teaching assistant for the course.

Her doctorate program “will help me become an expert on both anatomy and education,” she said. “Additionally, I’m excited for guest lecture opportunities to prepare to be an effective professor. Earning a Ph.D. will also allow me to be a competitive candidate for professor positions.”

SDSU aims to attract many more doctoral students such as Roland.

Advertisement

One of the goals of the university’s 2023 Pathway to Premier strategic plan is research, driven by a plan to obtain R1 Carnegie Classification, which would be a first for South Dakota.

The classification framework was developed by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education in the early 1970s to support its research program. The R1 designation indicates the highest level of research activity and is achieved based on factors such as how much the university invests in research and how many research-based doctoral graduates are produced.

South Dakota is one of just five states without an R1 university.

“R1 really isn’t about SDSU,” President Barry Dunn said. “South Dakota needs SDSU to do this so our state and region’s economy can compete on a national scale.”

For SDSU, which currently is classified as R2, “we’re already exceeding how much is spent on research — but where we need to grow is in educating future researchers at the highest level and creating a research and development workforce,” said Daniel Scholl, vice president for research and economic development and an SDSU professor.

Advertisement

“That’s a big focus of ours.”

Like Roland, Brandon Scott also became somewhat of an accidental SDSU doctoral student. After receiving his undergraduate degree in biochemistry at Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania, he stumbled upon SDSU at a conference and decided to apply. He ultimately earned his graduate degree and Ph.D. in biochemistry, spending seven years in Brookings and advancing his research in microscopy techniques.

“When I came out, I was very impressed,” he said. “I couldn’t have gone to a better place, actually, especially with my mentor, Adam Hoppe. It couldn’t have worked out any better for me.”

He’s now an assistant professor in nanoscience and biomedical engineering and a CZI imaging scientist at South Dakota Mines.

SDSU’s pursuit of R1 classification is more about what it takes to earn the distinction than the number itself, he added.

Advertisement

“What you have to do to get there and maintain it is the biggest thing,” Scott said. “You look at R1 institutions, and they keep turning out graduates and research because they have that momentum behind them. It’s not just the students you attract but the faculty you’re able to attract once you reach that status. I’m still very much integrated into what’s happening at SDSU, and I think some of the labs there, especially in biochemistry, already are rock stars.”

Achieving the R1 classification would reflect both a learning and business environment powered by research and its impacts. More research tends to drive business spinoffs, resulting in economic growth and a more educated workforce.

That’s already starting to happen in South Dakota, Dunn said. He points to companies such as animal vaccine developer and manufacturer Medgene, which “has well over 100 employees and is innovating how we protect our nation’s food supply,” he said.

“Its platform technology started on our campus with our facility. R1 will help us multiply those kind of successes in the private sector.”

SDSU typically graduates about 50 doctoral students and needs to reach 70 annually to achieve R1 classification.

Advertisement

The first step in that direction “is remarkably simple and affordable,” Dunn said.

“We have to offer graduate assistants benefits. Think about it. They’re typically around 25 years old and coming off their parents’ health insurance. Often, they’re starting families of their own. If you’re one of those students, are you going to pursue a doctoral degree at SDSU, an R2 university with no benefits, or are you going to seek out a prestigious R1 that covers your health insurance?”

The classification also helps in recruiting and retaining faculty, Scholl added.

“Because this is a place where they can visualize having a successful career in their field,” he said. “That serves as an added attractor for Ph.D. students, and it all adds up to greater research activity. And when we do research, the funds we bring in through grants and contracts are spent locally, so it stimulates the local economy and the knowledge spills over into the economy.”

The Research Park at SDSU further supports its progression to R1 classification.

Advertisement

“It serves as a place where the private sector can be very close to the university without being in the university,” Scholl said. “You’re very close to the faculty expertise and expertise of the doctoral and undergrad students who are potentially recruitable.”

Companies such as General Mills, POET and Raven Industries, which is part of CNH Industrial, regularly use the research park for their work and to build relationships at SDSU, he said.

“Having things like a university research park and having the private sector close at hand will help us grow research and research education to perform like an R1 university,” Scholl said.

The good news is, achieving R1 classification isn’t far out of reach, Dunn added.

“From the strength, scope and scale of our academic programs to our beautiful, modern campus to our outstanding faculty, we are well on our way to achieving this status, which will benefit the entire state.”

Advertisement

To learn more about research at SDSU, click here.



Source link

Continue Reading

South Dakota

It's South Dakota's Mega Small Town Festival Weekend

Published

on

It's South Dakota's Mega Small Town Festival Weekend


This weekend South Dakota has the ultimate lineup of small-town entertainment.  All leading up to Father’s Day.

I’m not sure why they like to pack them all into the month of June, but it sets up for the best road trip of the summer.

South Dakota Hidden Gems: Weekend Festivals And Road Trip Delights

Hartford Jamboree Days

Google Maps Streetview

Let’s start in Hartford for Jamboree Days Thursday through Sunday (June 13-16). Everything from a carnival to parades to tractor pulls, to a 5K, plus the Little Miss Hartford Pageant.

Now head over to Garretson. It’s only about a 30-minute drive to Jesse James Days on Friday through Sunday (June 14-16). Register for the golf tournament and the Jesse James Road Race. Kids can enter the Pedal Tractor Pull.

Advertisement

Next stop Teapot Days in Tea on Thursday through Saturday (June 13-16). Show off your ride in the Hot Rod car show. There will be outstanding food, live music, and fireworks.

attachment-tabor

Google Maps

Hope you’re not tired yet because next we take a drive to Tabor, South Dakota for Czech Days on Friday and Saturday (June 14-16). Fill up on kolaches and polka music.

This is like the Great River Road Wine Trail of the Mississippi River, but with so much more to offer.

You Need To Go To These South Dakota Food Festivals This Summer

Click on the Picture for More Info – All Dates Subject To Change

Advertisement





Source link

Continue Reading

South Dakota

Katelyn Engel named to South Dakota State University's spring 2024 dean's list

Published

on

Katelyn Engel named to South Dakota State University's spring 2024 dean's list


Submitted

BROOKINGS, S.D. — South Dakota State University announces Katelyn Engel of Hays, Kansas, (67601) has been named to the dean’s list for the spring 2024 semester.

Engel is a student in SDSU’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

More than 3,300 students were recognized for their outstanding academic performance over the sping 2024 semester at South Dakota State by being named to the dean’s list.

Advertisement

To earn dean’s list distinctions in SDSU’s colleges, students must have completed a minimum of 12 credits and must have earned at least a 3.5 GPA on a 4.0 scale. Students with F, I, U, RI or RU grades are not eligible regardless of system term GPA attained. Note that this report includes courses that were taken at other South Dakota institutions this term. A minimum of 12 credits within the 100-699 course range must be taken. A student who passes pregeneral education courses may still qualify, if the student has 12 other credits that do fall within the 100-699 range.

Overall, 3,378 students from 40 states and 37 foreign nations are on the list. More than 1,400 students received a 4.0 GPA, and those are indicated with an asterisk.

About South Dakota State University

Founded in 1881, South Dakota State University is the state’s Morrill Act land-grant institution as well as its largest, most comprehensive school of higher education. SDSU confers degrees from seven different colleges representing 230 majors, minors and specializations. The institution also offers 39 master’s degree programs, 16 Ph.D. and two professional programs.

The work of the university is carried out on a residential campus in Brookings, at sites in Sioux Falls, Pierre and Rapid City, and through Extension offices and Agricultural Experiment Station research sites across the state. SDSU’s research expenditures for the 2023 fiscal year were more than $74 million.

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending