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Retire Congress North Dakota Spearheading Effort for Age Limits in Congress – U.S. Term Limits

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Retire Congress North Dakota Spearheading Effort for Age Limits in Congress – U.S. Term Limits


Immediate Release

March 18, 2024

Media Contact: David Johnson, Strategic Vision PR Group
Ph: (404) 380-1079
Email: djohnson@strategicvisionpr.com

Congressional Age Limits Amendment Approved for June 11th Primary Vote
Retire Congress North Dakota Spearheading Effort to Prohibit
Any North Dakotan Over 80 To Serve in Congress

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Bismarck, ND – Today, Retire Congress North Dakota announced that its proposed amendment to the North Dakota state Constitution that would prohibit anyone from North Dakota aged 80 or older from serving in Congress will be on the June 11th primary ballot.  The proposed amendment, if passed, would not impact any current North Dakota congressional office holders eligible for reelection in 2024.  Retire Congress North Dakota submitted 42,107 signatures. Out of that total, 32,370 signatures  were accepted surpassing the required 31,164 signatures needed to get the amendment on the ballot.

Without congressional term limits in our federal constitution preventing members from serving indefinitely, many in Congress hold their positions for life.  Many Americans favor age limits for Congress if congressional term limits are not implemented, especially with many in Congress aged 80 or older.

“Serving in Congress has become a lifelong occupation for many members,” said Jared Hendrix, Chair of Retire Congress North Dakota. “Sadly, Congress has gone from the world’s greatest deliberative body to one of the nation’s best assisted living facilities.  Retire Congress North Dakota recognizes basic truths. With age comes health and cognitive decline, which invariably lead to absences and policy concerns. Some have served even though their cognizance has been called into question.

“Now in North Dakota we are prepared to do something about it and set age limits for Congress,” continued Hendrix. “With the overwhelming response in signatures to get this amendment on the ballot, I have no doubt it will easily pass in June. Once it is passed, other states will follow North Dakota’s lead in setting age limits. “Even limiting the age at 80 is far above the retirement age in the military and many private corporations,” concluded Hendrix. “The average age of retirement in America is 64. Everybody else retires, I don’t see why politicians should be different. You can’t run for Senate until you’re 30, or Congress until you’re 25. So we already have age limits on the lower end, just not the upper end.”

The proposed amendment sets a maximum of 80 years and states no person may be elected or appointed to serve a term or a portion of a term in the U.S. Senate or the U.S. House of Representatives if that person could attain 81 years of age by December 31st of the year immediately preceding the end of the term.  Once approved by voters, age limits on congressional candidates would be effective Jan. 1, 2025.

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U.S. Term Limits is the largest nonpartisan, nonprofit organization advocating solely on term limits. Our mission is to improve the quality of government with a citizen legislature that closely reflects its constituency and is responsive to the needs of the people it serves. U.S. Term Limits does not require a self-limit on individuals. Our aim is to limit the terms of all members of Congress as an institution. Find out more at termlimits.org.



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North Dakota

Burgum, 21 Republican governors urge pause to new EPA air quality rule

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Burgum, 21 Republican governors urge pause to new EPA air quality rule


BISMARCK — North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum and 21 other Republican governors called Thursday for the Environmental Protection Agency to pause its new rule that limits fine particles in the air.

In a Thursday, April 11 letter addressed to EPA Administrator Michael Regan, the governors wrote the new rule will hit rural communities the hardest. The rule, which changes the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for fine particulate matter, is scheduled to take effect May 6.

“The EPA wants to move the goal posts on these air toxic standards,” Burgum said this week during a meeting of the Energy Development and Transmission Committee. “When they move those goal posts, they are taking it to just unbelievable levels.”

Rural communities and businesses will be forced to make air quality changes at a higher cost per capita than other areas and will struggle to meet the standards, the governors wrote.

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“This one-size-fits-all rule is the wrong approach and particularly burdensome to states like North Dakota where air quality is frequently degraded by wildfire smoke from western states and Canada that is beyond our control,” Burgum said in a news release. “This new EPA standard ignores the progress made in reducing particulate matter over the last 20 years and threatens to drive up costs for industry and consumers and damage our economy.”

The governors also estimated that 20% of U.S. counties will be deemed non-compliant once the rule goes into effect, the letter said.

The EPA said the rule protects “millions of Americans from harmful and costly health impacts, such as heart attacks and premature death,” according to the agency’s website.

The EPA also said particle, or soot, pollution is one of the most dangerous forms of air pollution.

In addition to Burgum, the letter was signed by the Republican governors of: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia and Wyoming.

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This story was originally published on NorthDakotaMonitor.com

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This story was written by one of our partner news agencies. Forum Communications Company uses content from agencies such as Reuters, Kaiser Health News, Tribune News Service and others to provide a wider range of news to our readers. Learn more about the news services FCC uses here.





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Burgum: Lawmakers should budget for court battles over federal regulations

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Burgum: Lawmakers should budget for court battles over federal regulations


BISMARCK — Gov. Doug Burgum told a group of lawmakers Wednesday to spare no expense in fighting federal regulations that affect North Dakota’s energy industry.

President Joe Biden’s administration has tightened environmental policies in a number of areas — including an Environmental Protection Agency rule on mercury emissions that North Dakota officials say targets the state’s lignite industry.

The EPA says the rule change is necessary to mitigate serious health risks caused by air pollutants. Analysis by the EPA found the rule will have “relatively minor impacts” on the energy industry, according to a fact sheet on the federal agency’s website.

Yet in testimony before the Energy Development and Transmission Committee, Burgum called the rules and other federal regulations cumbersome, illogical and an “existential threat” to North Dakota’s energy and agriculture industries.

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The governor said he fears this trend will only continue if Biden is reelected — and that the Legislature should be ready to finance a spate of new lawsuits against the federal government in hopes the courts will roll the regulations back.

“As bad as it is right now, I don’t want anybody to think it couldn’t get worse,” Burgum told the committee.

The energy industry is a major driver for state revenue, which is why the stakes are so high for North Dakota, Burgum said. Fending off the rules will mean giving the Attorney General’s Office more money to hire special assistant AGs, he continued.

“I don’t want the attorney general to be going, ‘Well, I’m not sure I’ve got it in my budget,’” Burgum said. “Man, that would be penny-wise, pound-foolish when the billions of dollars of revenue that all of you appropriated is at risk.”

The governor’s office is preparing two state budgets to propose to lawmakers ahead of next year’s legislative session: one for if former President Donald Trump wins the election, and a Biden budget that sets aside more money for legal fees.

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Burgum said the Legislature set aside at least $15 million in the 2023-25 state budget for lawsuits challenging federal regulations. Of that, $6 million went to the Industrial Commission — $3 million for lignite lawsuits, and the other $3 million for oil and gas litigation, he said. Another $4 million went to the Attorney General’s Office, and $5 million was appropriated for agriculture.

Burgum was far from the only state official at the meeting with strong words for the federal government.

David Glatt, director of the Department of Environmental Quality Director, called regulatory action under Biden an “unprecedented trainwreck” for North Dakota.

Lynn Helms, director of the Department of Mineral Resources, also encouraged the state to seek relief in court.

“It will be an incredible challenge to undo the rules and regulations that have been promulgated,” Helms said.

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Sen. Merrill Piepkorn, D-Fargo — who last week announced he was joining the race to succeed Burgum as governor — took a more reserved stance.

“I have to be better educated on the subject as to where we are right now, and what the anticipated work would be,” he said. “I don’t know if I would be preparing a huge budget to hire additional attorneys right off the bat.”

This story was originally published on NorthDakotaMonitor.com

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This story was written by one of our partner news agencies. Forum Communications Company uses content from agencies such as Reuters, Kaiser Health News, Tribune News Service and others to provide a wider range of news to our readers. Learn more about the news services FCC uses here.

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Third South Dakota tribal nation bans Noem from reservation

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Third South Dakota tribal nation bans Noem from reservation


The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has become the third tribal nation to ban South Dakota Kristi Noem (R) from its reservation land.

On Wednesday, the Standing Rock Tribal Council voted to ban Noem from its land for “racially charged” comments she made at town halls events alleging that some tribal leaders are “personally benefitting” from Mexican drug cartel activity on reservations, the South Dakota Searchlight reported.

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is straddles the border of North Dakota and South Dakota. The Governor was banned from two other reservations earlier this year, which started after she delivered remarks on the U.S.-Mexico border in February.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairwoman Janet Alkire said in a release that Noem’s attempts to link tribes with the Mexican cartel was “irresponsible” and a “sad reflection of her fear-based politics that do nothing to bring people together to solve problems.”

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“Rather than make uninformed and unsubstantiated claims, Noem should work with tribal leaders to increase funding and resources for tribal law enforcement and education,” Alkire’s statement said, reported by the Searchlight.

Alkire called a special meeting after a motion to ban Noem was introduced by Alice Bird Horse and seconded by Cyril Archambault.

The Oglala Sioux Tribe banned Noem in February, shortly after her remarks at the border. Frank Star Comes Out, the president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, said the ban was effective immediately and due to the safety of Oyate.

The Cheyanne River Sioux also voted to ban Noem last week. The South Dakota governor is now banned from about 10 percent of the land in the state she governs, CNN noted.

In a video posted to social media platform X, Noem announced Thursday that she was offering a “history-making opportunity” to the state’s tribes by creating a law enforcement training course over the summer.

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“Now, it’s not going to address every single challenge, but this training is a crucial first step towards addressing public safety issues in our tribal communities,” she said.

The Hill has reached out to Noem’s office for comment on the latest banning.

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