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Northern Colorado softball scores twice in the bottom of the seventh, rallies for 4-3 win over North Dakota

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Northern Colorado softball scores twice in the bottom of the seventh, rallies for 4-3 win over North Dakota


The Northern Colorado softball team scored twice in the bottom of the seventh against North Dakota, rallying for a 4-3 win Saturday in Lincoln, Nebraska, and its ninth win in 12 games on the spring-break trip.

UNC (15-16) started the bottom of the seventh trailing the Fighting Hawks 3-2 at the University of Nebraska’s Bowlin Stadium.

Quinn Myers-Lenz drew a lead-off walk from North Dakota pitcher Jackie Albrecht. After a strike out to Amailee Morales, Ella Gonzales walked and Myers-Lenz went to second.

Sabrina Javorsky tied the game at 3-3 with a single to the right side of the field, scoring Myers-Lenz. Javorsky had two of UNC’s five hits with two RBI.

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Katie Thomson, pinch-running for Gonzales, went to third on an Ali Steinker single to right and scored the game-winning run on an error by North Dakota right fielder Mariah Peters.

UNC wraps up its 13-game trip Sunday morning against host University of Nebraska. The teams split their two previous games in Lincoln on the UNC trip. UNC beat the Cornhuskers 5-3 Tuesday and lost to Nebraska 6-5 Thursday.

The Bears committed six errors against North Dakota. The Fighting Hawks (5-26) committed two errors, leading to one unearned run for UNC. Both teams scored twice in the third inning. North Dakota went ahead 3-2 in the top of the fourth.

UNC senior pitcher Erin Caviness (8-5) earned the win in two innings of relief of starter Isabelle DiNapoli. Caviness didn’t give up a hit and struck out four with no walks.

DiNapoli allowed three runs (two earned) on five hits with five strikeouts and three walks in five innings.

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Summit, in second attempt at permit, touts economic benefits of carbon pipeline

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Summit, in second attempt at permit, touts economic benefits of carbon pipeline


BISMARCK — Summit Executive Vice President Wade Boeshans cited Summit Carbon Solutions paying more than $14 million annually for electricity to operate its carbon capture and storage project as an economic benefit to North Dakota, but SuAnn Olson had a different reaction.

“Where is this power going to come from?” asked Olson, a state representative who lives near the carbon pipeline route north of Bismarck. “We’re very quickly coming to a time when the power supply is not going to keep up.”

Testifying on Earth Day, witnesses advocating for the Summit Carbon Solutions carbon capture pipeline emphasized economic benefits to North Dakota, making little mention of environmental benefits as a second round of Public Service Commission hearings on the pipeline began Monday, April 22 in Mandan.

The PSC denied Summit a pipeline route permit last year. The three-person PSC agreed to allow a rehearing on Summit’s application, giving Summit the chance to address deficiencies cited in the permit denial — including changing the route around Bismarck.

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Dan Pickering of Pickering Energy Partners, left, and Harold Hamm of Continental Resources wait for a Public Service Commission hearing to begin on April 22, 2024, in Mandan. Behind, a pipeline opponent displays a sign before the hearing administrator asked him to put it down.

Kyle Martin / For the North Dakota Monitor

To open the hearing, Administrative Law Judge Hope Hogan outlined that the hearings should show that the project will have minimal adverse effects on the environment and people of North Dakota and be a good use of resources.

The Summit rehearing started with Dan Pickering of Pickering Energy Partners in Houston who touted the potential economic benefits to North Dakota.

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“There’s a potential to at least support, if not enhance, the price of corn, which would then flow through to farmers here in the state of North Dakota,” Pickering said.

Tharaldson Ethanol is so far the only ethanol plant in North Dakota signed on to the project that would capture carbon emissions from 57 ethanol plants across five states.

Boeshans of Bismarck noted that about half the corn in North Dakota is sold to ethanol plants. Tharaldson Ethanol, near Casselton, buys 15% to 20% of the crop, he said.

Summit’s plan is to store the carbon underground northwest of Bismarck but Pickering testified about potential industrial uses of carbon dioxide, including enhanced oil recovery in North Dakota, the nation’s No. 3 oil-producing state.

“With a carbon infrastructure that could potentially develop in North Dakota, more carbon coming into the state creates more opportunities for the energy business to enhance their recovery,” Pickering said.

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Summit moved its route to give a wider berth to the city of Bismarck. The original route had drawn objections from property developers and others as being too close to the city.

When public testimony began, residents near Baldwin north of Bismarck testified about being concerned about the pipeline that will run near, but not across their property.

“I see nothing but cost for North Dakota,” Lynette Dunbar said.

She cited the potential for rising electric rates and how a leak or rupture could affect her family and livestock.

Karl Rakow of Bismarck noted the 2022 rupture of a CO2 pipeline in Satartia, Mississippi, that sickened dozens of people. He said the plume from the rupture drifted 16 miles and the pipeline is about nine miles north of Bismarck.

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Summit executives said in written testimony it considered having the pipeline cross the Missouri River south of Bismarck on its way to a carbon storage area northwest of Bismarck.

Chief Operating Office Jimmy Powell said potential routes included the Dakota Access pipeline corridor, but he said the company could not find a viable route.

Powell noted environmental and cultural constraints on a southern route and “the impact to Tribal lands in the area south of Bismarck.”

Powell testified that the reroute added 55 new miles in North Dakota and is about 12 miles longer than the previous route.

In miles added north of Bismarck, Powell said about 42% of the route has been obtained through voluntary easements.

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Overall in North Dakota, 81% of the pipeline miles have been acquired through voluntary easements and 79% of the landowners have agreed to allow the pipeline through their land.

Without a voluntary easement, Summit could resort to using eminent domain, a legal process to force landowners to provide right-of-way. Potential use of eminent domain has been a main point of protest for pipeline opponents.

State Rep. Mike Brandenburg, R-Edgeley, said there are about 113 miles of pipeline set to run through his district. He is also a corn grower and said he has become convinced that North Dakota agriculture needs the pipeline.

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Members of the public raise their hands April 22, 2024, to indicate they plan to speak during a Public Service Commission hearing in Mandan on the Summit Carbon Solutions project.

Kyle Martin / For the North Dakota Monitor

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Brandenburg noted that Canada, a large export market for U.S. ethanol, has adopted a low-carbon fuel standard that will make it difficult for North Dakota ethanol producers to sell into that market.

“Some people want nothing to do with it and that’s their right,” Brandenburg said.

Ken Huber of Bismarck said in reply to Brandenburg, “We are not willing to give up our safety for the price of corn.”

The PSC had reserved a room at the Baymont Inn in Mandan for the entire week but it appears hearings will wrap up in one day.

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There also will be hearings May 24 in Wahpeton and June 4 in Linton.

This story was originally published on NorthDakotaMonitor.com

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This story was written by one of our partner news agencies. Forum Communications Company uses content from agencies such as Reuters, Kaiser Health News, Tribune News Service and others to provide a wider range of news to our readers. Learn more about the news services FCC uses here.

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10 Famous Singers from North Dakota – Singersroom.com

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10 Famous Singers from North Dakota – Singersroom.com


North Dakota may not be the first place that comes to mind when you think of music, but this seemingly unassuming state has produced its fair share of musical talent. From the vast plains and rolling hills of North Dakota have emerged some of the most celebrated voices in the music industry. In this article, we will delve into the lives and careers of the top 10 famous singers hailing from the Peace Garden State.

These singers have transcended geographical boundaries to captivate audiences worldwide with their remarkable talent and undeniable charisma. From country crooners to pop sensations, North Dakota has given birth to a diverse array of musical luminaries who have left an indelible mark on the industry.

Each of these artists brings a unique flavor to the musical landscape, showcasing the rich tapestry of talent that North Dakota has to offer. Through their soul-stirring lyrics and powerful performances, they have captured the hearts of millions and solidified their place in music history.

Join us on a journey through the lives and careers of these extraordinary individuals as we explore what sets them apart and makes them shine in the constellation of global music stars.

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1. Peggy Lee

Peggy Lee, a luminous gem in the realm of music, hails from North Dakota, etching her indelible mark as one of the state’s most beloved treasures. Born Norma Deloris Egstrom in Jamestown, North Dakota, on May 26, 1920, Peggy Lee’s transcendent talent and enchanting voice captivated audiences worldwide.

Her illustrious career spanned over six decades, adorned with accolades including Grammy Awards, Academy Award nominations, and induction into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. Lee’s velvety contralto voice effortlessly traversed genres, from jazz to pop, leaving an enduring legacy through timeless classics like “Fever,” “Is That All There Is?,” and “Why Don’t You Do Right?”

Beyond her musical prowess, Lee’s charisma and stage presence captivated audiences, solidifying her status as an icon of elegance and sophistication. Her influence transcended generations, inspiring countless artists and earning her a place among the greatest singers of all time.

Peggy Lee’s enduring legacy continues to resonate, her songs weaving through the fabric of American culture. Her journey from the plains of North Dakota to the pinnacles of global stardom is a testament to the transformative power of talent, perseverance, and passion.

2. Lawrence Welk

Lawrence Welk, a legendary figure in the world of music and entertainment, proudly claims North Dakota as his birthplace. Born on March 11, 1903, in the small farming community of Strasburg, Welk’s humble beginnings laid the foundation for an illustrious career that would span generations.

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Welk’s signature “champagne music” captivated audiences worldwide, earning him a place in the pantheon of American music icons. His eponymous television program, “The Lawrence Welk Show,” became a beloved staple of American television for over three decades, showcasing his infectious charm, wholesome demeanor, and unparalleled musical talent.

With his accordion in hand, Welk led his orchestra through a repertoire of timeless classics and contemporary hits, enchanting audiences with his warm personality and magnetic stage presence. His dedication to showcasing a diverse array of musical styles, from polka to pop, endeared him to audiences of all ages.

Beyond his musical accomplishments, Welk’s legacy endures as a symbol of the American Dream, embodying the values of hard work, perseverance, and a commitment to excellence. His contributions to music and television have left an indelible mark on popular culture, ensuring that his legacy will continue to inspire future generations for years to come.

3. Bobby Vee

Bobby Vee, born Robert Thomas Velline on April 30, 1943, in Fargo, North Dakota, emerged as one of the most popular singers of the 1960s, leaving an indelible mark on the landscape of rock and pop music. Despite his humble beginnings in the Midwest, Vee skyrocketed to fame with his irresistible charm, velvety voice, and undeniable talent.

His breakout hit, “Take Good Care of My Baby,” catapulted him to stardom in 1961, igniting a string of chart-topping singles that captivated audiences around the world. Vee’s smooth vocals and heartfelt lyrics resonated with listeners, earning him a devoted fan base and cementing his status as a teen idol.

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Throughout his career, Vee showcased his versatility as a performer, seamlessly transitioning between rockabilly, pop, and ballads with effortless grace. His magnetic stage presence and infectious energy electrified audiences, making him a sought-after headliner on tours across the globe.

Despite facing personal tragedies and challenges, including the loss of his wife, Vee’s passion for music never waned. He continued to record and perform, leaving behind a timeless legacy of hits that continue to inspire and uplift listeners to this day.

Bobby Vee’s enduring influence on the world of music remains unparalleled, his songs serving as a testament to the power of perseverance, talent, and the enduring spirit of rock and roll.

4. Jonny Lang

Jonny Lang, a prodigious talent born on January 29, 1981, in Fargo, North Dakota, emerged as one of the most electrifying blues and gospel musicians of his generation. From a young age, Lang’s soulful voice and virtuosic guitar playing captured the attention of audiences and critics alike, propelling him to stardom.

His debut album, “Lie to Me,” released when he was just 15 years old, showcased Lang’s astonishing vocal range and mastery of the blues genre. Songs like the title track and “Breakin’ Me” catapulted him into the spotlight, earning him critical acclaim and a fervent fan base.

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With each subsequent album, Lang continued to push the boundaries of his musical prowess, seamlessly blending elements of rock, gospel, and soul into his distinctive sound. His dynamic live performances, characterized by searing guitar solos and impassioned vocals, solidified his reputation as a consummate performer.

Despite his youth, Lang’s lyrics reflected a depth and maturity beyond his years, exploring themes of love, loss, and redemption with raw honesty and vulnerability. His authenticity resonated with audiences, earning him a devoted following around the world.

Jonny Lang’s enduring legacy as a pioneer of modern blues music is a testament to his unparalleled talent and unwavering dedication to his craft. With each note he plays and every lyric he sings, Lang continues to inspire and uplift listeners, leaving an indelible mark on the world of music.

5. Josh Duhamel

Josh Duhamel, though not primarily known as a singer, is a prominent figure hailing from Minot, North Dakota, who has made significant contributions to the entertainment industry. Born on November 14, 1972, Duhamel rose to fame as a model before transitioning into acting, where he garnered widespread acclaim for his versatile performances on both the small and big screens.

While Duhamel’s talents primarily lie in acting, his North Dakotan roots have undoubtedly influenced his career trajectory and personal identity. Throughout his career, Duhamel has remained deeply connected to his hometown, often citing his upbringing in the Midwest as a formative influence on his character and values.

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As an actor, Duhamel has showcased his range and charisma in a diverse array of roles, from romantic comedies to action-packed blockbusters. His roles in projects such as “Transformers,” “Las Vegas,” and “Safe Haven” have solidified his status as a beloved and recognizable figure in Hollywood.

Beyond his on-screen endeavors, Duhamel has also been actively involved in philanthropy and charitable causes, using his platform to raise awareness and support for issues close to his heart. His commitment to giving back reflects his Midwestern upbringing and values, embodying the spirit of compassion and community that defines North Dakota.

While Josh Duhamel may not be a singer in the traditional sense, his contributions to the entertainment industry and his enduring connection to his North Dakotan roots make him a beloved figure in his home state and beyond.

6. Jan Garber

Jan Garber, a luminary in the realm of big band music, proudly hailed from Indiana, but his contributions to the world of music reached far and wide, captivating audiences across the nation, including those in North Dakota. Born on November 5, 1894, in Indianapolis, Garber’s musical journey began at an early age, eventually leading him to become one of the most celebrated bandleaders of his time.

Garber’s orchestra, renowned for its smooth melodies and distinctive sound, became a mainstay on the airwaves and in ballrooms throughout the United States during the 1920s and 1930s. With hits like “Baby Face” and “On the Sunny Side of the Street,” Garber’s music became synonymous with the carefree spirit of the Jazz Age, earning him a devoted following and widespread acclaim.

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Despite facing challenges during the Great Depression and changing musical tastes in the post-war era, Garber’s orchestra continued to thrive, adapting to new styles and trends while retaining its timeless appeal. Garber’s enduring legacy as a bandleader and musician is a testament to his unparalleled talent, innovative spirit, and unwavering dedication to his craft.

While Jan Garber’s connection to North Dakota may not be as prominent as some of the state’s native sons and daughters, his music undoubtedly left an indelible mark on audiences throughout the region, serving as a source of joy, inspiration, and nostalgia for generations to come.

7. Ann Cole Lowe

Ann Cole Lowe, a trailblazing fashion designer, may not have been a singer, but her impact on the world of fashion resonates far and wide, including in North Dakota. Born on December 14, 1898, in Clayton, Alabama, Lowe’s journey to becoming one of the most renowned couturiers of her time was marked by perseverance, talent, and a pioneering spirit.

Lowe’s designs graced the pages of high-fashion magazines and adorned the elite of society, earning her a reputation for exquisite craftsmanship and timeless elegance. Her most notable achievement came in 1953 when she was commissioned to design Jacqueline Kennedy’s wedding dress for her marriage to John F. Kennedy, a feat that solidified her status as a fashion icon.

Despite facing discrimination and adversity as an African American woman in the predominantly white world of fashion, Lowe remained undeterred, breaking down barriers and paving the way for future generations of designers. Her commitment to excellence and dedication to her craft serve as an inspiration to aspiring artists and designers around the world.

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While Ann Cole Lowe’s ties to North Dakota may not be widely known, her influence on the world of fashion transcends geographic boundaries, leaving an indelible mark on the industry and inspiring countless individuals to pursue their passions with courage and determination.

8. The White Stripes

The White Stripes, a dynamic duo that revolutionized the modern rock scene, originated from Detroit, Michigan, but their electrifying music resonated with audiences worldwide, including those in North Dakota. Comprising Jack White and Meg White (who claimed to be siblings but were actually divorced), The White Stripes burst onto the music scene in the late 1990s with their raw, garage rock sound and minimalist aesthetic.

Jack White’s blistering guitar riffs and primal vocals, combined with Meg White’s primal drumming, created a distinctive and exhilarating sound that captured the essence of rock ‘n’ roll rebellion. Hits like “Seven Nation Army” and “Fell in Love with a Girl” propelled the band to international fame, earning them critical acclaim and a devoted following.

Despite their simple instrumentation and stripped-down approach, The White Stripes’ music was imbued with depth and complexity, drawing inspiration from blues, punk, and folk traditions. Their willingness to experiment and push boundaries set them apart from their peers, cementing their legacy as one of the most influential rock bands of the 21st century.

While The White Stripes may not have had a direct connection to North Dakota, their music undoubtedly left an impression on audiences throughout the state, inspiring countless musicians and fans with their unbridled energy and uncompromising creativity.

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9. 4th Ave

4th Ave, a contemporary boy band that emerged from the eleventh season of the television show “The X Factor,” captured the hearts of audiences across the nation, including in North Dakota. Comprising members Mikey Jimenez, Camry Jackson, Jaden Gray, and Marcus Pendleton, 4th Ave showcased their exceptional vocal harmonies, charismatic stage presence, and infectious energy throughout their journey on the show and beyond.

Following their time on “The X Factor,” 4th Ave embarked on a meteoric rise, releasing original music and captivating audiences with their soulful performances and dynamic choreography. Their debut single “XOXO” garnered widespread acclaim, showcasing their versatility and potential as a rising force in the music industry.

Despite their young age, the members of 4th Ave demonstrated maturity and professionalism beyond their years, earning them a devoted fan base and recognition as one of the most promising boy bands of their generation. With each new release, they continue to push the boundaries of their artistry, forging a path to success on their own terms.

While 4th Ave may not have a direct connection to North Dakota, their music undoubtedly resonates with audiences throughout the state and beyond, inspiring fans with their infectious enthusiasm and undeniable talent. As they continue to evolve and grow as artists, 4th Ave remains poised to leave an indelible mark on the world of music.

10. Chuck Suchy

Chuck Suchy, a singer-songwriter and folk musician, is a cherished figure in North Dakota’s music scene, known for his heartfelt lyrics, soulful melodies, and deep connection to the Midwestern landscape. Born and raised in Mandan, North Dakota, Suchy’s music reflects the spirit of the plains, drawing inspiration from the beauty and simplicity of rural life.

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With his rich baritone voice and masterful guitar playing, Suchy has crafted a vast repertoire of songs that celebrate the joys and challenges of life on the prairie. His music weaves together themes of love, family, nature, and the passage of time, resonating with listeners who appreciate authenticity and sincerity.

Throughout his career, Suchy has released numerous albums, earning acclaim from critics and audiences alike for his evocative storytelling and timeless melodies. Songs like “Dakota Breezes,” “Goodnight From the Plains,” and “On the Prairie” have become anthems for those who cherish the unique culture and landscape of the Great Plains.

Beyond his music, Suchy is also a respected advocate for rural communities and environmental conservation, using his platform to raise awareness about issues affecting the Midwest. His commitment to preserving the heritage and natural beauty of the region shines through in his lyrics, embodying the spirit of stewardship and resilience that defines North Dakota.

Chuck Suchy’s enduring legacy as a musician and storyteller is a testament to his deep love for his home state and its people. Through his music, he continues to inspire and uplift audiences, reminding us of the timeless beauty and boundless spirit of the Great Plains.



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New bill to fund Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library announced

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New bill to fund Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library announced


Supporters of the Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library in North Dakota are cheering new federal legislation to help build the library and to showcase artifacts of the 26th president, who as a young man hunted and ranched in the state during its territorial days.

Last week, North Dakota’s three-member, all-Republican congressional delegation announced the bill to “authorize funding for the Library’s continued construction and go towards ensuring the preservation of President Roosevelt’s history and legacy.” The bill’s Interior Department grant is for $50 million of one-time money, most of which “will go into creating the museum spaces in our facility,” said Matt Briney, the library’s chief communications officer.

WORKERS MAKE HEADWAY ON THEODORE ROOSEVELT PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY IN NORTH DAKOTA’S BADLANDS

The bill also enables and directs federal agencies to work with the library’s organizers to feature Roosevelt items in the library’s museum, he said.

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Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library CEO Ed O’Keefe stands near a bronze statue of the 26th president, Aug. 23, 2023, in Mandan, N.D. Supporters of the Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library are cheering new federal legislation to help build the library and to showcase artifacts of the 26th president, who as a young man hunted and ranched in the state during its territorial days.  (AP Photo/Jack Dura)

In 2019, North Dakota’s Republican-controlled Legislature approved a $50 million operations endowment for the library, available after its organizers raised $100 million in private donations for construction. That goal was met in late 2020.

The project has raised $240 million in private donations, and complete construction costs $333 million, Briney said. Covering the library’s construction costs has not been an issue, he said.

Construction is underway near Medora, in the rugged, colorful Badlands where the young future president briefly roamed in the 1880s. Organizers are planning for a grand opening of the library on July 4, 2026, the United States’ 250th anniversary of independence.

In a statement, the congressional delegation hailed the bill as “a wise investment in our nation’s historical preservation.” In the same press release, the bill drew praise from descendant Theodore “Ted” Roosevelt V and North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum, who championed the library to the 2019 Legislature.

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The bill would require a two-thirds match from state funds or non-federal sources, and it would prohibit the federal money from going toward the library’s maintenance or operations.

Planned exhibits include a chronological view of Roosevelt’s life, such as galleries of his early life, time in the Badlands, travels to the Amazon and his presidency, Briney said.

The 2023 Legislature approved a $70 million line of credit for the library through the state-owned Bank of North Dakota, which Briney said library planners have not tapped.

That line of credit drew scrutiny last year from Republican state Rep. Jim Kasper, who called it a “$70 million slush fund” that could leave taxpayers on the hook. Library CEO Ed O’Keefe has said the line of credit was intended as backstop to help ensure construction could begin.

In an interview, Kasper called the library, which he supported, “a beautiful thing for the state of North Dakota … but I want private funds raised to pay for it.”

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“If there’s going to be taxpayers’ dollars that are used, then I’d rather have federal dollars used than taxpayers of North Dakota dollars,” Kasper said. “Obviously there’s still taxpayer dollars. But I really don’t support any taxpayer dollars being used for the project, whether they’re state or federal.”

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Other presidential libraries have been built with private donations or non-federal money. Some have received funds for construction and development from state and local governments and universities, then have been transferred to the federal government and run by the National Archives and Records Administration through that agency’s budget, according to the National Archives’ website.

The Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Library will always be privately held, said Briney, who called the legislation’s money “not necessarily uncommon.”



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