Connect with us

North Dakota

North Dakota shows most support for Christian nationalism in US, new study finds

Published

on

North Dakota shows most support for Christian nationalism in US, new study finds


FARGO — North Dakota was an outlier in a recent study which used the largest dataset ever assembled to determine attitudes toward Christian nationalism in the United States.

Data from the nonpartisan, nonprofit Public Religion Research Institute found

that while more than two-thirds of Americans are either skeptical of or reject Christian nationalism, half of 158 North Dakotans polled are supporters of or adherents to it.

The respondents of the survey were asked the degree to which they agreed or disagreed with the following series of statements, which are the main tenets of Christian nationalism:

Advertisement
  • “The U.S. government should declare America a Christian nation.”
  • “U.S. laws should be based on Christian values.”
  • “If the U.S. moves away from our Christian foundations, we will not have a country any more.”
  • “Being Christian is an important part of being truly American.”
  • “God has called Christians to exercise dominion over all areas of American society.”

Once considered a far-right fringe ideology, Christian nationalism has been steadily gaining adherents in the U.S. over the last two decades. In recent years, that momentum has accelerated in parallel with the popularity of former President Donald Trump.

Christian nationalist ideology is often used as the primary driver behind the imposition of abortion and book bans, school curriculum restrictions, and limitations of the rights of LGBTQ+ individuals.

North Dakota appears to be at the vanguard of that growing movement, according to the study.

The study showed the top five states for support of Christian nationalism were North Dakota, Mississippi (50%), Alabama (47%), West Virginia (47%) and Louisiana (46%).

Republicans (55%) were more than twice as likely as independents (25%) and more than three times as likely as Democrats (16%) to hold Christian nationalist views, according to the study. Among Trump supporters, 55% have Christian nationalist sympathies, whereas only 15% of President Joe Biden supporters espouse Christian nationalism.

More North Dakota Stories

Advertisement

In North Dakota, the state legislature has been in the spotlight in recent sessions for constitutionally murky efforts to restrict transgender rights, allow public funding of religious schools, and authorize the posting of the Ten Commandments in public schools.

Cody Schuler, advocacy manager for the American Civil Liberties Union of North Dakota, said the constitutional right to religious belief and expression is being used to attack another Constitutional right — that which prohibits the government from preferring religion over non-religion, or favoring one religion over another.

“Regardless of whether they name it, or someone wears a Christian nationalist badge or not, we see those sympathies at every turn. The principles that are named in the study are clearly present in the practical and pragmatic way that politics are being exercised in our state today. We are seeing North Dakota lawmakers seek to put their religious perspectives into law and, in many cases, be very open about that. It has been at the heart of most of our culture war debates — this idea of imposing Christian ideals into the way that the state is governed,” Schuler said.

We are seeing North Dakota lawmakers seek to put their religious perspectives into law and, in many cases, be very open about that.

Cody Schuler, advocacy manager for the ACLU of North Dakota

Advertisement

At least one North Dakota legislator has

recently and publicly professed Christian nationalist views.

In an October post on X, formerly Twitter, Bismarck Republican Rep. Brandon Prichard wrote, “Evey conservative state should put into code that Jesus Christ is King and dedicate their state to Him…We need a government of Christians, not fakers.”

Two other Republican legislators, Janne Myrdal and Mike Wobbema,

Advertisement

turned their backs

to a guest chaplain last session when her prayer paid tribute to racial and gender diversity. They accused the chaplain of lobbying from the pulpit, and

later accused

former Lt. Gov. Lloyd Omdahl, a North Dakota political columnist, of having a “misunderstanding of Christian, Biblical Doctrine having manifested itself under the umbrella of our current state of social issues,” when

he questioned their decorum.

Advertisement

Neighboring states showed mixed results in the study. In Minnesota, just 28% of respondents showed adherence or support for Christian nationalism, while 42% of South Dakotans espoused it.

Respondents in California, New York, and Virginia were the least supportive of Christian nationalism, with more than 75% identifying as rejectors or skeptics.





Source link

North Dakota

Burgum, 21 Republican governors urge pause to new EPA air quality rule

Published

on

Burgum, 21 Republican governors urge pause to new EPA air quality rule


BISMARCK — North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum and 21 other Republican governors called Thursday for the Environmental Protection Agency to pause its new rule that limits fine particles in the air.

In a Thursday, April 11 letter addressed to EPA Administrator Michael Regan, the governors wrote the new rule will hit rural communities the hardest. The rule, which changes the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for fine particulate matter, is scheduled to take effect May 6.

“The EPA wants to move the goal posts on these air toxic standards,” Burgum said this week during a meeting of the Energy Development and Transmission Committee. “When they move those goal posts, they are taking it to just unbelievable levels.”

Rural communities and businesses will be forced to make air quality changes at a higher cost per capita than other areas and will struggle to meet the standards, the governors wrote.

Advertisement

“This one-size-fits-all rule is the wrong approach and particularly burdensome to states like North Dakota where air quality is frequently degraded by wildfire smoke from western states and Canada that is beyond our control,” Burgum said in a news release. “This new EPA standard ignores the progress made in reducing particulate matter over the last 20 years and threatens to drive up costs for industry and consumers and damage our economy.”

The governors also estimated that 20% of U.S. counties will be deemed non-compliant once the rule goes into effect, the letter said.

The EPA said the rule protects “millions of Americans from harmful and costly health impacts, such as heart attacks and premature death,” according to the agency’s website.

The EPA also said particle, or soot, pollution is one of the most dangerous forms of air pollution.

In addition to Burgum, the letter was signed by the Republican governors of: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia and Wyoming.

Advertisement

This story was originally published on NorthDakotaMonitor.com

______________________________________________________

This story was written by one of our partner news agencies. Forum Communications Company uses content from agencies such as Reuters, Kaiser Health News, Tribune News Service and others to provide a wider range of news to our readers. Learn more about the news services FCC uses here.





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

North Dakota

Burgum: Lawmakers should budget for court battles over federal regulations

Published

on

Burgum: Lawmakers should budget for court battles over federal regulations


BISMARCK — Gov. Doug Burgum told a group of lawmakers Wednesday to spare no expense in fighting federal regulations that affect North Dakota’s energy industry.

President Joe Biden’s administration has tightened environmental policies in a number of areas — including an Environmental Protection Agency rule on mercury emissions that North Dakota officials say targets the state’s lignite industry.

The EPA says the rule change is necessary to mitigate serious health risks caused by air pollutants. Analysis by the EPA found the rule will have “relatively minor impacts” on the energy industry, according to a fact sheet on the federal agency’s website.

Yet in testimony before the Energy Development and Transmission Committee, Burgum called the rules and other federal regulations cumbersome, illogical and an “existential threat” to North Dakota’s energy and agriculture industries.

Advertisement

The governor said he fears this trend will only continue if Biden is reelected — and that the Legislature should be ready to finance a spate of new lawsuits against the federal government in hopes the courts will roll the regulations back.

“As bad as it is right now, I don’t want anybody to think it couldn’t get worse,” Burgum told the committee.

The energy industry is a major driver for state revenue, which is why the stakes are so high for North Dakota, Burgum said. Fending off the rules will mean giving the Attorney General’s Office more money to hire special assistant AGs, he continued.

“I don’t want the attorney general to be going, ‘Well, I’m not sure I’ve got it in my budget,’” Burgum said. “Man, that would be penny-wise, pound-foolish when the billions of dollars of revenue that all of you appropriated is at risk.”

The governor’s office is preparing two state budgets to propose to lawmakers ahead of next year’s legislative session: one for if former President Donald Trump wins the election, and a Biden budget that sets aside more money for legal fees.

Advertisement

Burgum said the Legislature set aside at least $15 million in the 2023-25 state budget for lawsuits challenging federal regulations. Of that, $6 million went to the Industrial Commission — $3 million for lignite lawsuits, and the other $3 million for oil and gas litigation, he said. Another $4 million went to the Attorney General’s Office, and $5 million was appropriated for agriculture.

Burgum was far from the only state official at the meeting with strong words for the federal government.

David Glatt, director of the Department of Environmental Quality Director, called regulatory action under Biden an “unprecedented trainwreck” for North Dakota.

Lynn Helms, director of the Department of Mineral Resources, also encouraged the state to seek relief in court.

“It will be an incredible challenge to undo the rules and regulations that have been promulgated,” Helms said.

Advertisement

Sen. Merrill Piepkorn, D-Fargo — who last week announced he was joining the race to succeed Burgum as governor — took a more reserved stance.

“I have to be better educated on the subject as to where we are right now, and what the anticipated work would be,” he said. “I don’t know if I would be preparing a huge budget to hire additional attorneys right off the bat.”

This story was originally published on NorthDakotaMonitor.com

______________________________________________________

This story was written by one of our partner news agencies. Forum Communications Company uses content from agencies such as Reuters, Kaiser Health News, Tribune News Service and others to provide a wider range of news to our readers. Learn more about the news services FCC uses here.

Advertisement





Source link

Continue Reading

North Dakota

Third South Dakota tribal nation bans Noem from reservation

Published

on

Third South Dakota tribal nation bans Noem from reservation


The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has become the third tribal nation to ban South Dakota Kristi Noem (R) from its reservation land.

On Wednesday, the Standing Rock Tribal Council voted to ban Noem from its land for “racially charged” comments she made at town halls events alleging that some tribal leaders are “personally benefitting” from Mexican drug cartel activity on reservations, the South Dakota Searchlight reported.

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe is straddles the border of North Dakota and South Dakota. The Governor was banned from two other reservations earlier this year, which started after she delivered remarks on the U.S.-Mexico border in February.

Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairwoman Janet Alkire said in a release that Noem’s attempts to link tribes with the Mexican cartel was “irresponsible” and a “sad reflection of her fear-based politics that do nothing to bring people together to solve problems.”

Advertisement

“Rather than make uninformed and unsubstantiated claims, Noem should work with tribal leaders to increase funding and resources for tribal law enforcement and education,” Alkire’s statement said, reported by the Searchlight.

Alkire called a special meeting after a motion to ban Noem was introduced by Alice Bird Horse and seconded by Cyril Archambault.

The Oglala Sioux Tribe banned Noem in February, shortly after her remarks at the border. Frank Star Comes Out, the president of the Oglala Sioux Tribe, said the ban was effective immediately and due to the safety of Oyate.

The Cheyanne River Sioux also voted to ban Noem last week. The South Dakota governor is now banned from about 10 percent of the land in the state she governs, CNN noted.

In a video posted to social media platform X, Noem announced Thursday that she was offering a “history-making opportunity” to the state’s tribes by creating a law enforcement training course over the summer.

Advertisement

“Now, it’s not going to address every single challenge, but this training is a crucial first step towards addressing public safety issues in our tribal communities,” she said.

The Hill has reached out to Noem’s office for comment on the latest banning.

Copyright 2024 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending