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It's Election Day in North Dakota. Here's where to vote in Cass County

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It's Election Day in North Dakota. Here's where to vote in Cass County


FARGO — Cass County voters can head to the polls to vote in their local primary elections from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, June 11.

Voters in Cass County can view the approximate wait time for specific polling locations by visiting

casscountynd.gov/pollinglocations.

Voters must present a valid ID that includes their name, current street address and date of birth when they vote. Valid forms of identification include a North Dakota driver’s license, a nondriver’s identification card, an ID issued by a tribal government or a long-term care identification certificate.

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Early voting concluded Friday with 4,263 people casting ballots in Cass County and 11,653 doing so statewide, according to Monday afternoon figures from the North Dakota Secretary of State’s office.

In Cass County, 1,615 of 2,404 absentee and vote-by-mail ballots were returned as of Monday, according to the Secretary of State’s office. Statewide, 32,695 of 42,530 absentee and vote-by-mail ballots were returned as of Monday.

Voters in Cass County can cast their ballots at any polling place in the county.

Voting locations in Fargo and West Fargo for the primary election on Tuesday, June 11, 2024.

Troy Becker / The Forum

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  • Atonement Lutheran Church, 4601 S. University Drive.
  • Calvary United Methodist, 4575 45th St. S.
  • Cass County Courthouse, 211 Ninth St. S.
  • El Zagal Shrine, 1429 Third St. N.
  • Fargo Civic Center, 207 Fourth St. N.
  • Fargodome, 1800 N. University Drive.
  • Northview Church, 3401 25th St. S.
  • Olivet Church, 1330 S. University Drive.
  • Ramada, 3333 13th Ave. S.
  • Scheels Arena, 5225 31st Ave. S.
  • Double Tree, 825 E. Beaton Drive.
  • Hartl Ag Building, 1805 Main Ave. W.
  • Hulbert Aquatic Center, 620 Seventh Ave. E.
  • Triumph West Church, 3745 Sheyenne St. S.
  • Arthur Community Hall, 550 Main St., Arthur.
  • Casselton Days Inn, 2050 Governor’s Drive, Casselton.
  • Harwood Community Hall, 210 Freedland Drive, Harwood.
  • Horace Senior Center, 214 Thue Court, Horace.
  • Kindred City Hall, 31 Fifth Ave. N., Kindred.
  • Tower City Community Center, 507 Broadway St., Tower City.

More information about voting can be found by visiting

The Forum’s election resources page.

Our newsroom occasionally reports stories under a byline of “staff.” Often, the “staff” byline is used when rewriting basic news briefs that originate from official sources, such as a city press release about a road closure, and which require little or no reporting. At times, this byline is used when a news story includes numerous authors or when the story is formed by aggregating previously reported news from various sources. If outside sources are used, it is noted within the story.





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North Dakota

Voters Here Just Passed Age Limits for Congress

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Voters Here Just Passed Age Limits for Congress


Tuesday’s GOP primary in North Dakota is now over, and the victors are celebrating. Nestled in with those announcements is one regarding a “high-profile initiative” that voters also passed: Candidates out of the Peace Garden State can’t run for US Congress (so neither the Senate nor the House) if they would turn 81 years old at any point during their term, per the AP. Axios reports that this appears to be the first state to impose a measure like this, with both that outlet and the New York Times noting the vote comes against the backdrop of the conversation on how old President Biden (81) and former President Trump (turning 78 on Friday) are as they run for the Oval Office again.

The ballot measure would effectively amend the state’s constitution. Still, lawmakers concede that the move will likely be challenged in court, as a 1995 Supreme Court ruling determined that states “cannot impose additional restrictions, such as term limits, on its representatives in the federal government beyond those provided by the Constitution.” Although there are age minimums laid out in the US Constitution—25 for the House, 30 for the Senate—there’s no cap on the max end.

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Jared Hendrix, a GOP politician from Fargo who helped spearhead the North Dakota initiative, thinks his state is only the first to move in this direction, especially since US opinion polls over the past few years show that a majority of Americans would be all for maximum age limits. “I think it’s very possible that if we pull this off here, other states will follow,” Hendrix said before Tuesday’s election, per the Times. (More North Dakota stories.)





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North Dakota

North Dakota voters approve age limit for members of US Congress

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North Dakota voters approve age limit for members of US Congress


North Dakota voters approved a ballot initiative during their primary election on Tuesday that would place an age limit on candidates in the state running for U.S. congressional seats.

The measure, believed to be the first of its kind in the country, prohibits anyone from running or serving in the U.S. House or Senate from North Dakota if they would turn 81 years old or older during their term.

However, several outlets have reported the constitutional amendment will likely be challenged in court.

A little over 60% of voters approved the measure during the state’s primary election.

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It reads: “No person may be elected or appointed to serve a term or a portion of a term in the U.S. Senate or the U.S. House of Representatives if that person could attain 81 years of age by December 31st of the year immediately preceding the end of the term.”

If implemented, it would not affect any current U.S. Congress members from North Dakota.

The novel ban comes at a time when the age and fitness for duty of legislative leaders and presidential candidates are being heavily discussed — though age does not always lead to cognitive decline.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Politics

9:08 PM, Aug 12, 2023

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Should age limits be set for US elected officials in office?

The current Congress, the 118th, is the second-oldest Senate and third-oldest House in American history.

According to an NBC News analysis last year, the median age for U.S. senators is the highest on record at 65.

Currently, there are over a dozen senators over 75 years old, three of whom are over 80: Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa (90), Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont (82) and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (82).

McConnell faced public pressure for freezing twice during press conferences last year and having to be escorted away, but he said it wasn’t due to a stroke. The longest-serving Senate leader will step down from the role next year, but plans to finish out his Senate term, which doesn’t end until 2027.

There are at least 20 U.S. representatives who are 80 years old or older, including former Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

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At 81, President Joe Biden is the oldest sitting U.S. president, and he would be 86 years old by the end of a second term if he is reelected. Former President Donald Trump turns 78 this week.

The two are the oldest candidates to seek the White House, and both have argued they are fit for the position despite their age.

They’re also among the oldest world leaders, according to a report from Pew Research Center. Data shows the median age of current global leaders is 62.



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North Dakota

Who is Cara Mund? Anti-Trump former Miss America loses Republican primary for North Dakota’s sole US House seat

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Who is Cara Mund? Anti-Trump former Miss America loses Republican primary for North Dakota’s sole US House seat


Former Miss America-turned politician Cara Mund, who recognised herself as a staunch anti-Trump Republican, failed the bid to secure the GOP congressional primary to become North Dakota’s first female member of the United States House of Representatives.

Cara Mund was the lone contender from her state to win the Miss America title in 2017, at the age of 23. (X@CaraMund)

Mund was the lone contender from her state to win the Miss America title in 2017, at the age of 23. After attending public schools, she joined Brown University for her undergraduate degree and then earned her law degree from Harvard Law School. Later, she launched a campaign for Congress as an Independent.

She was competing in Republican primary to take over the seat vacated by Rep. Kelly Armstrong, who is vying for the North Dakota’s executive seat after Gov. Doug Burgum withdrew from the presidential nomination contest and declared he would not seek reelection as governor.

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The pageant queen, who had blasted Trump and North Dakota’s abortion legislation, lost the campaign to Julie Fedorchak, who garnered 46% of the vote in the state’s 1st Congressional District. Mund finished in third position, with 19.6% of the vote.

Mund lambasts Trump, says ‘I’ll be on the right side of history’

As she has identified herself as an anti-Trump, she has been vocal in her condemnation of the former president, particularly in light of his felony conviction.

“Proud to be the ONLY ND Republican Candidate not worshiping a convicted felon during this election,” Mund said in a post on X after Trump was convicted in hush money trial.

“I’ll be the voice of ND, not Donald Trump. I’ll be the leader who helps move the party back to law and order. I’ll be on the right side of history,” the former beauty queen added.

Also Read: Donald Trump calls Taylor Swift ‘very beautiful’ but says she’s also…

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In another post, she blasted her opponents for supporting and promoting Trump.

“My opponents want to put women’s healthcare in the hands of the government and care more about pleasing and promoting Trump than protecting democracy.”

Mund and 2018 Miss America pageant

She was not hesitant from speaking about contentious issues at the 2018 Miss America pageant.

During the contest, Mund condemned the Trump administration for withdrawing from the Paris climate pact.

Following her victory, she became entangled in a public feud with the Miss America Organization leadership, claiming she was “silenced,” and marginalized” in her role as Miss America.

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In 2022, she competed for the state’s sole congressional seat as an independent. According to the Independent, she was prompted by the leaked Dobbs ruling, which signaled the end of abortion rights. With 37.6% of the vote, Mund faced defeat against incumbent Armstrong.

Mund’s opponent Julie Fedorchak, who formerly served as Public Service Commissioner, earned Trump’s support for her campaign, which she has boasted about on her social media accounts.



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