Connect with us

Minneapolis, MN

Paul Rogers – Minneapolis

Published

on

Paul Rogers – Minneapolis


Nov. 13, 1942 – Feb. 1, 2024

Paul Rogers was born on Nov. 13, 1942, and died of pancreatic cancer, on Feb. 1, 2024, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
He grew up mostly in Rapid City, SD. He attended college at Augustana College, and seminary at Luther Northwestern.
Paul served congregations in Heilbronn, Germany, and in South Dakota at Valley Springs, Salem, Spencer, and Brookings, at Ascension Lutheran, and in Minnesota in Rock County and at Trinity Lutheran Congregation in Minneapolis, as well as a number of interim positions across the Twin Cities before retiring in 2006. He also worked in Geneva, Switzerland for the Lutheran World Federation, traveling across the world to help mission projects.
He helped start and nurture a close relationship between the Lutheran synods of Minneapolis and Leipzig, Germany.
Paul is survived by his wife Camille and their three children: their son, Anthony, Anthony’s wife Amanda and their two grandchildren, their other son Christopher, and their daughter Elisabeth, whose vulnerability and developmental disability was a source of deep love and grace for Paul. He is also survived by an older brother David, and a number of nieces and nephews. He is survived again by a whole passel of Camille’s siblings and cousins, who generously afforded Paul honorary membership in that side of the family.
A memorial service will be held at Christ Lutheran Church in Minneapolis, on Feb. 17, with a visitation beginning at 3 p.m.
The family requests memorial gifts be made out to Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church Foundation and to Mt. Olivet Rolling Acres.



Source link

Advertisement

Minneapolis, MN

Minneapolis: This Week (03/03/2024)

Published

on



Read more Minneapolis Music Guide. 02/28 Karina Rykman with Cloudchord at 7th St Entry Read More Karina Rykman bassist Karina Rykman (who replaced original bassist Dave Dreiwitz when he joined Ween) is all smiles, doing her head-banging on the bass. The group looks like they are having a good time…



Source link

Continue Reading

Minneapolis, MN

Minnesotans gather to mourn and honor Oklahoma nonbinary teen Nex Benedict

Published

on

Minnesotans gather to mourn and honor Oklahoma nonbinary teen Nex Benedict


Outside the Minneapolis Teacher’s Federation, on a chilly Friday evening, gatherers held candles to mourn, celebrate and honor the life of Nex Benedict, a 16-year-old nonbinary student who died after a fight at Owasso High School in Oklahoma.  

Benedict identified as nonbinary, a term used by people who identify with a gender that is not male or female, a person whose gender identity is more expansive. 

Student organizers from the Gender and Sexuality Alliance (GSA) at Edison High School in northeast Minneapolis organized the vigil in honor of Nex.  

“Everybody in GSA thought if we act now, it might create a big enough impact to at least show some respect for Nex,” said Kam, a GSA high school student organizer.

Advertisement

MPR News is supported by Members. Gifts from individuals power everything you find here. Make a gift of any amount today to become a Member!

Attendees gather prior to the start of a candlelight vigil hosted by the Thomas Edison High School Gender and Sexuality Alliance.

Liam James Doyle for MPR News

Throughout the evening, speakers called for political action in Minnesota and across the country to honor Nex Benedict’s life and to protect the safety of transgender youth.   

“This is holy ground tonight because we gather to remember Nex Benedict,” said Rev. Justin Sabia-Tanis, associate professor at United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities. “It is holy because we gather here to remember Nex Benedict. It is holy because you and I are here, and we are sacred, holy people.” 

Advertisement

Sabia-Tanis spoke out against anti-transgender policymaking, including bills passed in several states that restrict transgender people from using the bathrooms that fit their gender. 

“Those who make anti-trans laws and encourage their passage are complicit in each act of violence that occur because of what they say and because of the laws that they pass,” Sabia-Tanis said.

Two people snuggle together outside

S.J. Amado and their child Zochi Nelsen-Amado snuggle together during a candlelight vigil hosted by the Thomas Edison High School Gender and Sexuality Alliance.

Liam James Doyle for MPR News

Rep. Leigh Finke, DFL-St. Paul, is the chair of the Queer Legislative Caucus. She said in the days since the news broke, she finds herself “unable to stop apologizing to Nex.” 

“I am sorry you will not find your way in this world,” said Finke, “I’m sorry you will not experience the radical joy of queer adulthood. I am sorry you will not live the fullest realities of a whole human life.” 

Advertisement

Several of the evening’s speakers addressed Nex Benedict’s death as a part of the epidemic of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Relatives. Benedict’s mother was a citizen of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. 

Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan, a member of the White Earth Nation, added to the calls for accountability on the part of policymakers, including Gov. Kevin Stitt of Oklahoma. In 2022, Stitt signed a bill requiring public school students to use bathrooms according to the gender listed on their birth certificates. 

A person stands with a rainbow stole and candle

Rev. Mary Visas of the Federation of Christian Ministries during a candlelight vigil hosted by the Thomas Edison High School Gender and Sexuality Alliance.

Liam James Doyle for MPR News

“This did not happen on accident. Policies have consequences,” said Flanagan. 

Flanagan observed that she and Stitt, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, are the only two Native Americans to hold executive offices in state government across the country.  

Advertisement

“As an Anishinaabekwe, I cannot say that it is all right with our Indigenous values that our children are bullied and made to suffer and are hurting,” said Flanagan.  

“It is not who we are. That is not where we come from, and we will continue to do everything in the state of Minnesota, but that is not enough,” said Flanagan. 

GSA student organizers say they need bathroom solutions 

Student organizers with Gender and Sexual Alliance organizers were accompanied at the vigil by their teacher Amelia Marquez.  

Marquez recalled moving from Montana to seek greater safety in Minnesota as a transgender person and called on allies of transgender youth in helping to create safe spaces in schools. 

A woman holds a candle and a small transgender pride flag

Jane Robertson of Lino Lakes holds a transgender pride flag during a candlelight vigil hosted by the Thomas Edison High School Gender and Sexuality Alliance.

Liam James Doyle for MPR News

Advertisement

“These kids should not be afraid to go to the bathroom to go to in our schools here in Minneapolis and St. Paul,” said Marquez. 

GSA student organizer Keeda Johnson said students need “bathroom solutions.” “We need a community who is going to stick up for our LGBTQ+ rights,” said Johnson. 

“The genderqueer students have to stand and sit and sometimes even to go the nurse like we are sick because we have to go to the bathroom,” said Johnson. “It’s humiliating to have to go to the nurse and say ‘we have to pee’ because there is not a bathroom that fits our gender identity. It hurts, it makes me at least feel like something is wrong.” 

Johnson encouraged youth to seek out resources which affirm their gender identity. 

People hold candles and stand behind railings

A sign is displayed during a candlelight vigil hosted by the Thomas Edison High School Gender and Sexuality Alliance.

Liam James Doyle for MPR News

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading

Minneapolis, MN

Minneapolis man, convicted as a teen in double murder, now eligible for parole

Published

on

Minneapolis man, convicted as a teen in double murder, now eligible for parole


MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO News) – A Minneapolis man convicted for his role in the killing of a woman and her child is now eligible for consideration of parole following a resentencing.

On Friday, a Hennepin County judge resentenced 32-year-old Brian Flowers to two concurrent sentences of life in prison, with the possibility of release. As a stipulation of the sentencing, Flowers agreed to dismiss a motion for a new trial and to cease his post-conviction litigation.

In 2008, Brian Flowers helped his accomplice Stephon Thompson in the stabbing deaths of Katricia Daniels and her 10-year-old son Robert Shepard in Minneapolis. Officials say Daniels was stabbed more than 100 times inside her home, while her son died after being hit on the head with a television.

Flowers and Thompson were convicted in 2009 on two counts of murder and each sentenced to two life terms — without the possibility of parole.

Advertisement

Between 2012 and 2016, federal and state case law changed to allow those convicted when under 18 years old to be sentenced to life with the possibility of parole. The changes meant Flowers could be eligible for parole consideration after 60 years, or in 2068.

Eight years later, Flowers was resentenced to two concurrent life sentences, which made him eligible for parole 30 years earlier, or in 2038. The court records say Flowers played a “lesser role” in the murders than Thompson.

Federal and Minnesota law changes played a “significant role” in the revised outcome, officials said.

Last year, Minnesota law changed again regarding juvenile sentencing. Two consecutive life sentences are eligible for parole after 20 years and one or more concurrent life sentences are eligible after 15 years.

Ramsey County Attorney John Choi announced the resentencing outcome. Last April, his office was asked by the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office to complete the prosecution due to a potential conflict of interest.

Advertisement

Read his full statement below

“After a lot of work and thorough consideration of all the legal and factual issues involved in this case, we concluded that Mr. Flowers should receive a concurrent sentence for his role in the murders of Katricia Daniels and Robert Shepard. Because we were not involved with the protracted and contentious litigation that this case generated for over eleven years, we could independently evaluate Mr. Flowers’ culpability and, in hindsight, take into consideration past judicial rulings and the significant changes to Federal and State laws that occurred during this lengthy litigation. The law is an expression of our community’s values and when the law changes to it is important guidance on how prosecutors should exercise our decision making. From our perspective, it is significant that, on appeal, the Minnesota Supreme Court determined in 2010 that Mr. Flowers’ role in this case was far less than his co-defendant. We came to the same conclusion after reviewing this case for the past ten months and therefore resolved this case in a manner that reflected his lesser culpability, achieved an end to the litigation, and recognized the reality that the distinction between consecutive and concurrent sentences for Mr. Flowers was small due to retroactive changes in the law made by the Minnesota Legislature in 2023.”



Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending