Connect with us

Minneapolis, MN

Man sentenced to 12 years in prison for attempted murder in shooting of Minneapolis police officer

Published

on

Man sentenced to 12 years in prison for attempted murder in shooting of Minneapolis police officer


Olivia Spies, 12, crossed the courtroom gripping a lined piece of notebook paper and gathered her strength. Her dad stood beside her, gently placing a hand on her back as she conveyed the pain their family endured when a stranger shot and wounded him in the line of duty last summer.

“What he did was horrific and devastating to me — and I will never forgive him,” she told the judge Thursday, recounting the shooting of Minneapolis police officer Jacob Spies. “My dad is a hero and does many courageous things for people he doesn’t even know.”

Fredrick Davis Jr., 19, of Minneapolis, received a 12-year prison sentence and was convicted of attempted second-degree intentional murder during an emotional hearing Thursday, packed with uniformed police officers and command staff. Davis pleaded guilty last month, admitting to firing a dozen rounds at Spies, who was driving an unmarked car with tinted windows, on Aug. 11 during a joint enforcement detail on the North Side.

But Davis denied intentionally targeting a police officer, saying he pulled the trigger out of fear.

Advertisement

In his victim impact statement, Spies recounted how he’d been patrolling alone when he spotted a white SUV suspected of fleeing police following a robbery an hour earlier. He pursued the vehicle for about a mile and, just as he crested a hill, noticed the Chevy parked with its lights off.

Suddenly, Spies was overtaken by a volley of automatic gunfire — a sensation similar to having fireworks thrown at his car — and felt his right arm go numb.

He frantically radioed for help and sped away from the scene, expecting to drive himself to the hospital. But responding officers intercepted their wounded colleague and police initiated a high-speed chase that continued for 26 blocks until the Chevy crashed into a parked car.

The bullet remains embedded in the back of Spies’ shoulder, “a permanent souvenir” from that chaotic night.

“This was a calculated and planned ambush,” said Spies, a seven-year MPD veteran who was awarded a Medal of Honor and the department’s first Purple Heart. He lamented that Davis influenced a younger boy into participating and continued down a path of “felonious criminal activity” several years after Spies arrested him fleeing police in a stolen vehicle.

Advertisement

In December, a 17-year-old who shot at Spies but didn’t strike him also pleaded guilty to attempted second-degree murder. As part of his plea deal, William Ward Jr. is receiving treatment at the Red Wing juvenile facility and will remain on extended probation until he’s 21.

Senior Assistant County Attorney Patrick Lofton noted that Davis was riding around with multiple guns — one fully automatic and the other an unregistered ghost gun — with a juvenile in the car. It was mere luck that Spies survived the ordeal, he said, arguing that Davis’ actions demonstrated an extreme risk to public safety.

“His behavior exhibits a worldview in which you shoot first and ask questions later,” Lofton said, imploring Hennepin County Judge Hilary Caligiuri to impose a nearly 13-year prison term, the top of the sentencing guidelines box.

In response, Davis’ public defender Elizabeth Karp urged the court to consider the context. Davis survived a gunshot wound to the chest a year prior at the State Fair, resulting in lasting trauma. It made him afraid to leave the house, she said, and he obtained a firearm from a relative for protection.

Karp pushed back on the prosecutions’ depiction of Aug. 8, explaining that Davis saw an unknown vehicle following him that night and immediately “kicked into a fight or flight mode.”

Advertisement

“Mr. Davis made a bad choice in a panicked state of mind,” Karp said, acknowledging that it was not an excuse for what happened. “I don’t think the evidence shows that he knew who was in that car.”

She asked that the judge sentence Davis to 11 years, the lowest end of the box.

When given a chance to speak, Davis turned to his family in the front row and broke down explaining that he “didn’t know it was a police officer.” Davis said he took responsibility for crime, but denied forcing anyone else to participate or ever fleeing police that day.

“I’m not a bad person at all…I got family too,” he said, sniffling as he pleaded with the judge for a lighter sentence. “Everybody should get a second chance at life. Everybody makes mistakes.”

Caligiuri opted for a sentence near the top of the range, taking six months off for his willingness to accept a plea deal. Davis will spend less than 8 years in prison after accounting for time already served. In Minnesota, those sentenced to prison spend two-thirds of the sentence in custody and one-third under supervision.

Advertisement

His family left the courtroom wiping their eyes, then walked through a flank of two dozen uniformed officers taking turns embracing Spies in the hallway.

Outside, Davis’ mother who declined to be identified defended the character of her son, a high school graduate and “a good person… who has been through more than what people actually know.”

“To know Fred is to love Fred,” she said.

In the lobby, surrounded by fellow officers and Chief Brian O’Hara, Spies hailed the conclusion of a long criminal justice process that has weighed on his family.

“I’m glad it’s over,” he said, thanking the broader law enforcement community for their outpouring of support. “It means a lot to me.”

Advertisement



Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Minneapolis, MN

Mom remembered as hero after rushing toddler to hospital after Minneapolis shooting

Published

on

Mom remembered as hero after rushing toddler to hospital after Minneapolis shooting


A Minneapolis mother whose final act was to drive her son to the hospital, after both were shot in Minneapolis last weekend, was remembered on Sunday.

Advertisement

The vigil honored the life of 35-year-old Lillian Poalacin Perez.

Perez and her 2-year-old son were shot inside their vehicle in an alleyway off Cedar Avenue South, just north of East Lake Street, on Sunday, May 19. Police are investigating the shooting as a homicide, and working to determine if the mother and son were targeted.

No one has been arrested in the shooting.

Advertisement

Despite being gravely injured in the shooting, Perez drove her son to Children’s Minnesota to get him help. Perez died at Hennepin County Medical Center three days later. Her son is expected to survive.

Advertisement

Sunday evening, a week after Perez and her son were shot, dozens packed into the very same alleyway to remember the mom.

Police told FOX 9 the case is proving to be a difficult investigation. On Sunday night, members of the Latino community urged someone to come forward. Perez was an Ecuadorian immigrant.

Advertisement

“We need more members of the community coming out,” one speaker said. “If you see something, say something. We are here together — estamos aquí juntos. Muy, muy importante contigo vayamos trabajando juntos — so important we need to be working closely together.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Minneapolis, MN

Hope, continued activism, shine at fourth anniversary of George Floyd’s death

Published

on

Hope, continued activism, shine at fourth anniversary of George Floyd’s death


Four years after the killing of George Floyd, there are markedly fewer people protesting on the street. But many have not forgotten. 

“I live with George Floyd with me every day,” said Charles McMillian, who had stopped to witness the incident on May 25, 2020. He addressed a crowd on Saturday gathered to commemorate the day when a Minneapolis police officer knelt on Floyd’s neck for over nine minutes. 

“I carry him with me,” McMillian said. “I will carry him the rest of my life with me. I will carry him to my grave with me because he are me. He’s right here. He ain’t separated from me since the day.”

Charles McMillian, a witness who testified in the trial of Derek Chauvin, speaks to people gathered during a at memorial George Floyd Square in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Saturday.

Advertisement

Stephen Maturen for MPR News

Several events were held this weekend to remember Floyd, a now annual tradition in Minneapolis. A coalition of activist organizations held a solidarity rally on the corner of Lake Street and Chicago Avenue. They were joined by Floyd’s relatives as well as the family of Calvin Horton Jr., who was shot and killed by a pawn shop owner during the unrest that followed the death of George Floyd. Prosecutors declined to bring charges against the man.

Many activists say Minnesota hasn’t done enough.

“After the murder of George Floyd, we had the murder of Daunte Wright,” said Trahern Crews, founder of Black Lives Matter Minnesota. “After the murder of George Floyd, we had the murder of Amir Locke. We had the murder of Tekle Sundberg. And there still has not been any justice in any of those cases.”

Advertisement

The rally included Palestinian organizers, with many waving “Free Palestine” banners, and adding to calls for solidarity. “While we’re doing this work, we have to think about our Palestinian brothers, sisters and siblings, who are being massacred and killed, who are not free to live,” said Monique Cullars-Doty, who started organizing after St. Paul police killed her nephew Marcus Golden in 2015. 

The organizers got into their vehicles and rode to 38th Street and Chicago Avenue — the intersection known as George Floyd Square — to join a “Rise and Remember” event hosted by George Floyd Global Memorial, a nonprofit co-led by Floyd’s family.

The organization is being renamed after the event, in part to reflect their goal of advocating for all stolen lives, said Floyd’s aunt Angela Harrelson.

A crowd gathers, holding flowers and candles.

People hold flowers and candles during a memorial at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis on Saturday.

Stephen Maturen for MPR News

“I just want you all to know, we as a community, as people, impacted families, we have to be there for each other,” said Harrelson. “And we have to do battle. Everybody has to do battle because we cannot do this alone.”

Advertisement

Another relative of Floyd also spoke.

“We’ve all hurt, cried, suffered because of the loss of a loved one, so we’re not special. We just happen to be blood relatives of George Floyd,” said Thomas McClaurin, Floyd’s first cousin. “But think about if your family member lie on the ground in that corner. What would you do? Would you just wallow in your own stuff? Would you get up and do something? And that’s all ‘Rise and Remember’ is asking you all to do.” 

Several of Floyd’s relatives flew in from out of state to attend events this weekend. They shared smiles and hugs with local organizers, expressing the support they feel in Minneapolis. 

Six people stand near an altar full of candles.

Members of George Floyds family look on during a memorial at George Floyd Square in Minneapolis, Minnesota on May 25, 2024. Saturday marks four years since Floyd was killed while in the custody of Minneapolis Police.

Stephen Maturen for MPR News

“Every time I come down here, it just — my heart is broken and also it’s just happiness,” said Floyd’s aunt Mahalia Jones, visiting from North Carolina. “Because when I visit the George Floyd Square, there’s so much love and so much power in what y’all stand for. And it’s such a beautiful thing.” 

Advertisement

The event centered many of the organizers, residents, volunteers, and artists at the heart of George Floyd Square. 

Jamaican native Gloria Burnett has lived in the area for 30 years, earning the nickname “Mama G” for her role cooking, feeding, and caring for folks in the neighborhood. She took the stage on Saturday as her daughter, Christine Chambers, translated. 

“One thing I can say, honestly, is that I’ve seen that come out of this tragedy is I now know most, if not all, my neighbors,” said Burnett. “I’ve noticed that our community here and around the surrounding areas are building better bonds with each other, And everyone’s getting to know one another. Looking out for each other.”



Source link

Continue Reading

Minneapolis, MN

Vial Honors the Minneapolis Punk Tradition in Exciting Next-Gen Style – Review + Photos

Published

on

Vial Honors the Minneapolis Punk Tradition in Exciting Next-Gen Style – Review + Photos


Vial – All photos by Notes From Vivace

Photos and review by NOTES FROM VIVACE

LOS ANGELES – Vial, the three piece bratpunk band from Minneapolis, Minn., rushed onto the El Cid stage to start their set. That’s right, they didn’t walk casually from the stage entrance like most bands do. They ran onto the stage as their adoring fans, who had lined up early on Sunset Boulevard, and were now pressed up close, screamed their approval.

Vial - All photos by Notes From Vivace 8
Vial – All photos by Notes From Vivace

Teenagers with Xs marked on both their right and left hands were up front. Tweens were off to the side with their parents. The older crowd (maybe parents of some of those teenagers) were politely in the back. Someone yelled out to bassist Taylor Kraemer, “I love your hair.” Kraemer responded, “I love you, whoever said that.”

Vial – All photos by Notes From Vivace

The band released their second album at the end of March called burnout and has been on a 22-city tour to support the album, starting out with a record release party in their home town, and ending at Punk Rock Bowling. The album is 10 songs and comes in at a uniquely short 20 minutes. A song such as “two-faced” clocks in at 3 minutes 12 seconds while a song called “chronic illness flareups” is just 37 seconds.

Vial – All photos by Notes From Vivace

At El Cid, the band put on an 18-song clinic that had the crowd in the palm of their hands. The pop-punk song “bottle blonde” got the crowd singing to the quick hit lyrics. There were screams of approval to the fun loving ode to soup, “broth song.” The band most definitely loves good food as Kraemer’s bass had the words “Fish Fear Me” written on it. You knew the audience followed the band closely when it did the Nirvana cover “Territorial Pissings.” The band told the crowd that everyone knew what chant was needed to start the song and the crowd immediately started yelling “Piss! Piss! Piss!”

Vial – All photos by Notes From Vivace

During the set, an amusing tour tale was told. At their Toronto tour stop, Kraemer had an unfortunate encounter, “We stepped out of our disgusting van, sweating and stinky. And we look up at the venue, which is three flights of stairs. No f*cking elevator. And I immediately feel something on my shoulders and my brand new skirt. I look down, brown and white bird shit . . . f*ck the birds of Toronto.” Laughter and then cheers arose from that story as the band launched into “friendship bracelet” with drummer Katie Fischer starting the music off with pounding drum beats.

Vial – All photos by Notes From Vivace

Having fun in the mosh pit was expected of the fans. Early in the set, the band had the crowd repeat the following pledge to each other, “Dearest friend, you look good tonight. I hope after tonight, we can still be dearest friends, after I break your nose and steal all your teeth.” Then later in the set, the band had the crowd separate to the sides of the venue, leaving a wide gap down the middle. Why? The two sides rushed each other like the clash of opposing medieval fantasy armies. Did anyone break their nose or have their teeth stolen? Probably not, there was too much fun being had for hospital / dental visits to ruin the night.

Vial – All photos by Notes From Vivace

The song “Piss Punk” closed out the set. The intense beats had fans rushing the stage for one last mosh pit, “I can do the things that you do, and I can do them better than you. Do the things that you never thought that any fucking woman could do.” But back to the band having the crowd in the palm of their hands . . . guitarist KT Branscom stopped the song and told the crowd, “I need it to be completely and utterly silent.” The mosh pit ended and the venue went completely silent. “You guys are good at that.” A couple nervous laughs occurred, “Shh!!! No laughing. At the count of three, are you guys ready, one two three.” The crowd yelled back the chorus “You’re so boring” as they restarted jumping and dancing with abandon.

Vial – All photos by Notes From Vivace

An encore was demanded and provided. The band played a song that they said hadn’t been played in three years. Some in the crowd knew exactly what it would be and screamed out “DIY / Or Die.” Afterward, as the crowd was hustled by security to the El Cid patio (this was an early show and a later show was on the schedule), a conversation between two fans was overheard, “I had so much fun” with the reply, “Me, too.” Follow Vial on social media.

Vial – All photos by Notes From Vivace

Opening up for Vial were San Diego-based band (and west coast tour mates) Rain on Fridays and Los Angeles-based band Suzie True. Vial joined Rain on Fridays for the song “Slumber Party,” which is about not being the cool kids. It can be considered a bookend to the Vial song “friendship bracelet.” Their sound is fuzzy with garage rock influences and perhaps some painful teen memories, “Raise your hands if you’ve cried this week.”

Suzie True wowed the early crowd with their vocal screams and dynamic, as well as aerobic, stage show. Lead singer Lexi McCoy proclaimed her unabashed love for . . . “I love chocolate milk.” And exemplified the DIY attitude of many a Los Angeles band, “I feel like I was looking at a deep fryer and then I looked up and I was here.”

Vial setlist. two-faced, falling short, bottle blonde, broth song, Black Sheep (Metric cover), Ego Death, apathy, friendship bracelet, Roadkill, Territorial Pissings (Nirvana cover), ur dad, chronic illness flareups, Mr Fuck You, Planet Drool, Embryo, Rough, Piss Punk. Encore: DIY/Or Die

Advertisement

Rain on Fridays: evolutionary peak of boredom, Idiotic Defense, Cry It Out, Hey Man, Phono, Keep Yr Chin, Wasa, Slumber Party

 





Source link

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Trending