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Two 13-year-olds severely burned in backyard fire explosion in Lapeer

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Two 13-year-olds severely burned in backyard fire explosion in Lapeer


Two teens were injured in an explosion at a backyard fire pit in Lapeer over the weekend. 

The Lapeer fire chief said the accident was due to the two 13-year-old’s using an accelerant to light a bonfire. It happened Saturday night, according to a release from law enforcement. 

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Both were severely injured after getting critically burned in an explosion “likely caused by gasoline used to start the fire,” chief Mike Vogt said.

“Our thoughts are with the injured teens and their families,” he said in a statement. “This incident is a stark reminder of the importance of safe fire practices. Always ensure you’re following guidelines to prevent such accidents. Avoid using accelerants such as gasoline or diesel fuel to ignite campfires. Instead, use newspapers, kindling, approved starter logs, and clean-cut firewood.”

To keep safe while having a fire, people are encouraged not to use flammable liquids to ignite anything. 

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Instead, stick to newspapers, safety logs, and clean firewood. 

Having extinguishing tools nearby is also encouraged.



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Michigan

Safety advocates urge caution after boy nearly drowns in Lake Michigan

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Safety advocates urge caution after boy nearly drowns in Lake Michigan


Safety advocates urge caution after boy nearly drowns in Lake Michigan – CBS Chicago

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The 6-year-old boy was in critical condition Thursday after being pulled from Lake Michigan at Montrose Beach the night before. CBS 2 Investigator Megan Hickey reports.

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2024 Celebrate Michigan contest is here; how to enter your photos

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2024 Celebrate Michigan contest is here; how to enter your photos


Auroras. An eclipse. A draft. An explosion of summer colors and festivals. It’s time to Celebrate Michigan with the 18th installment of our annual photo contest.

The Detroit News’ Celebrate Michigan Photo Contest is open to all amateur photographers. The competition rewards outstanding photos of Michigan, its people, places, events and wildlife, with nine prizes of as much as $300 handed out at the end of the summer.  

Enter your images in one of our three themed categories:

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  • Views and vistas: For your pictures of landscapes, beaches, woodlands and urban beauty.
  • Fur, feathers and flora: For your pictures of wildlife, pets, critters and flowers.
  • Candid captures: Pictures of people doing the things they love to do — or have to do — in Michigan.

You can enter as often you like, as long as you were the photographer, you’re not a professional photographer, and the photo wasn’t selected as a Celebrate Michigan finalist in previous years. All photos must have been taken within the last five years, on or after May 23, 2019, so those wintery landscapes can be entered, too. Drone images are allowed, provided you follow all FAA regulations when taking them. Images produced by computers or artificial intelligence are not allowed.

How to enter the contest

Enter the contest at detne.ws/submit-photos

Each of 12 weeks, with the week ending at noon on Thursdays, judges from The Detroit News photo staff will select one finalist and one finalist runner-up for each category. At the end of the contest, the judges will select one winner and one award of excellence from among the finalists and runners-up in each category. A People’s Choice winner in each category will be chosen by an online public vote, Aug. 26-Aug. 30.

Each of the six winners will receive $300. Three additional Awards of Excellence, from the remaining finalists, will be chosen by the Detroit News photo staff and will receive $100 each.

See the full contest rules at detroitnews.com/celebrate-michigan. And start shooting.

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Disease expert speaks on bird flu after Michigan farmworker’s diagnosis

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Disease expert speaks on bird flu after Michigan farmworker’s diagnosis


MICHIGAN (WNEM) – Health officials spoke about the potential spread of bird flu after a Michigan resident became the second person in the United States diagnosed with the disease associated with an outbreak among dairy cattle.

“So, it is a very inefficient transmission, so that’s why people should not get worried,” said Dr. Nicholas Haddad, an infectious disease specialist from Central Michigan University.

He said a human case of bird flu diagnosed in a Michigan farmworker is no cause for the public to be alarmed.

State health officials made the announcement Wednesday, May 22, making it the second case associated with the outbreak in dairy cows. The first was in Texas last month.

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“The overall risk to the public from H5N1 infection remains low at this time. But as we see with this case and the prior one in Texas, the risk to farmworkers is elevated,” said Nirav Shah, principal deputy director for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

According to the CDC, the patient was in contact with cows believed to be infected with the disease. The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) is now warning farmers to tighten their safety measures.

“A lot of procedures that are already commonly employed on poultry farms in response to several years now of high alert with this disease have been establishing biosecurity procedures for dairy farms as well. So, more cleaning and disinfecting, instituting lines of separation to maintain clean areas of the farms, records, logbooks for visitors, biosecurity managers at farms,” said Tim Boring, director of MDARD.

The Texas and Michigan cases are similar in that each person reported having conjunctivitis.

Haddad said anyone who believes they have been exposed to the virus should monitor for symptoms.

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“It can be, you know, fever, cough, headache, head, muscle aches, and respiratory symptoms primarily,” he said. “Sometimes that can include conjunctivitis, which is inflammation of the eye covering or GI symptoms such as nausea or diarrhea.”

Health officials say there is no sign of person-to-person spread of the virus at this time, so the risk to humans remains low. They recommend being mindful of the potential for exposure.

“As we enter a fair season and agritourism time of the year, be thoughtful about visits to dairy farms,” Boring said. “Make sure you’re being smart about what kind of interface you might have with livestock.”

Officials also say the safety of the food supply is secure but they continue to warn not to consume unpasteurized dairy products.

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