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Texas Tech vs. Kansas Predictions & Picks – February 12

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Texas Tech vs. Kansas Predictions & Picks – February 12


Monday’s contest at United Supermarkets Arena has the No. 4 Kansas Jayhawks (19-5, 7-4 Big 12) taking on the No. 23 Texas Tech Red Raiders (17-6, 6-4 Big 12) at 9:00 PM ET ET (on February 12). Our computer prediction projects a close 74-72 win for Kansas, so it should be a tight matchup.

The game has no line set.

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Texas Tech vs. Kansas Game Info & Odds

  • Date: Monday, February 12, 2024
  • Time: 9:00 PM ET
  • TV: ESPN
  • Where: Lubbock, Texas
  • Venue: United Supermarkets Arena

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Texas Tech vs. Kansas Score Prediction

  • Prediction:
    Kansas 74, Texas Tech 72

Spread & Total Prediction for Texas Tech vs. Kansas

  • Computer Predicted Spread: Kansas (-1.3)
  • Computer Predicted Total: 146.3

Texas Tech has compiled a 10-12-0 record against the spread this season, while Kansas is 9-13-0. A total of 14 out of the Red Raiders’ games this season have hit the over, and 10 of the Jayhawks’ games have gone over. Texas Tech is 4-6 against the spread and 6-4 overall in its last 10 games, while Kansas has gone 5-5 against the spread and 6-4 overall.

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Texas Tech Performance Insights

  • The Red Raiders outscore opponents by 7.9 points per game (scoring 76.3 points per game to rank 115th in college basketball while allowing 68.4 per outing to rank 94th in college basketball) and have a +181 scoring differential overall.
  • Texas Tech prevails in the rebound battle by an average of 1.3 boards. It is collecting 35 rebounds per game (213th in college basketball) compared to its opponents’ 33.7 per contest.
  • Texas Tech knocks down 8.7 three-pointers per game (61st in college basketball) at a 37.5% rate (25th in college basketball), compared to the 7.9 its opponents make while shooting 33.5% from deep.
  • The Red Raiders score 100.5 points per 100 possessions (63rd in college basketball), while allowing 90.2 points per 100 possessions (128th in college basketball).
  • Texas Tech has committed 1.2 fewer turnovers per game than its opponents, averaging 10.3 (83rd in college basketball play) while forcing 11.5 (181st in college basketball).

Kansas Performance Insights

  • The Jayhawks put up 78.1 points per game (80th in college basketball) while giving up 67.5 per contest (69th in college basketball). They have a +254 scoring differential and outscore opponents by 10.6 points per game.
  • Kansas wins the rebound battle by 3.6 boards on average. It collects 36.6 rebounds per game, 126th in college basketball, while its opponents grab 33.
  • Kansas knocks down 6.2 three-pointers per game (299th in college basketball) at a 35.3% rate (113th in college basketball), compared to the 7.9 per contest its opponents make, shooting 32.1% from beyond the arc.
  • Kansas has committed 11.5 turnovers per game (191st in college basketball) while forcing 11.6 (167th in college basketball).

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© 2023 Data Skrive. All rights reserved.



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Gordon Monson: What does BYU’s win over Kansas mean?

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Gordon Monson: What does BYU’s win over Kansas mean?


Cougar basketball at last can grow to be something more than good, The Tribune columnist writes.

(Charlie Riedel | AP) BYU center Aly Khalifa (50) shoots during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Kansas Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2024, in Lawrence, Kan. BYU won 76-68.

One of BYU’s issues made worse during its years in the West Coast Conference, but present so often for so long, has been a low ceiling, a tendency for basketball to be good, almost always good, but rarely good enough to make any sort of notable dent against top-tier competition.

Upsets were pulled off now and again, but even in those good years a pall of doomed inevitability hung over Cougar hoops, a bit of reality causing anyone in and around the program, at least in moments of honesty, to know deep down that nothing grand would come of bits and pieces of success during stretches of long seasons.

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A few exceptions stand out.

Jimmer Fredette’s senior year in 2011, when BYU had a stellar team that made it to the Sweet 16, but was bumped off an even more promising track by whomever in the Honor Code Office decided big man Brandon Davies was too big of a sinner to be allowed to play in the final few games that year.

Mark Pope’s team in 2020, the one that knocked off second-ranked Gonzaga in one of the most memorable games ever in the Marriott Center, was a soaring scoring group, with three seniors who could light up a gym, individually or together, on any given night — Yoeli Childs, TJ Haws, and Jake Toolson. The Cougars had other guys on that team, too, and it would have made a strong run in the NCAA Tournament had it not been defeated by a formidable foe that shut down all of college basketball and a whole lot of the country and the world — COVID.

Then there was the Danny Ainge-led team back in 1981, the one that made it to the Elite Eight.

There were a couple of others in the mix, and if you want to lean all the way back to the NIT championship teams, back when that tournament actually meant something significant, you can. In between, though, there were a whole lot of good-for-who-it’s-for teams that quite understandably couldn’t be better than they were. They failed to capture the imagination.

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(Charlie Riedel | AP) BYU guards Jaxson Robinson, right, and Richie Saunders (15) hug after their NCAA college basketball game against Kansas Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2024, in Lawrence, Kan. BYU won 76-68.

Whoa. Hold on. That’s changing now.

The Cougars’ win on Tuesday night over Kansas at Phog Allen, a historical pinnacle in a place few visitors climb and conquer, registered in a huge way, sending out a signal that basketball at BYU, not just in a particular quirky moment, but for real is extending its reach.

Already, BYU had surprised this season, its inaugural run through college basketball’s best conference. As I wrote in a recent column, the Cougars had been expected to bump and skid over their first year in the Big 12. At that writing, they were 7-6 in the league, not an exceptional mark, but far superior to what anyone thought they could achieve so soon.

They subsequently dropped a roadie at K-State, and that loss disappointed those who had come around to the surprise Pope’s outfit was conjuring. But when the Cougars fired back for a win in one of college basketball’s most storied arenas, a place where the Jayhawks had a 19-game win streak, a place where they lose about as often as the Utah Legislature passes progressive laws, a place where Bill Self’s teams had established a probability of winning at 95 percent, it demonstrated that a team capable of doing that is also doing what few BYU teams have done in the past — lifting the ceiling and raising the roof.

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Dallin Hall took over that game, going for 13 second-half points, hitting clutch difference-making shots. But he had help from others.

Pope called the win “special.”

Self called the loss “pitiful.”

But he added that, “BYU was better than us tonight.”

As mentioned, being better than Kansas on any night is one thing, being that at Allen Fieldhouse is another.

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What does it mean?

(Charlie Riedel | AP) BYU guard Dallin Hall (30) shoots over Kansas center Hunter Dickinson (1) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2024, in Lawrence, Kan. BYU won 76-68.

Overall, the Cougars are 20-8, 8-7 in the Big 12, so it doesn’t mean BYU has a great team. What it means is that the opportunity to play in that league has handed it the chance to rise up not just on difficult occasions, but to be what it appears to be, to be battle-tested, to be real. What it means is that there’s nothing faux about an 8-7 record in the Big 12, that a mark like that not only prepares BYU for at least a shot at something more, it blows past a shiny record in a lesser conference, one that eventually will be revealed as something south of what it seems.

That’s a healthy thing for any aspiring basketball program. BYU’s recruiting limitations are and always will be a challenge, but not an impossible one to get around. Watch as Pope finds surprising talent in surprising places — he already has — luring that talent in by way of the opportunity spoken of, afforded by way of playing You-Know-Where.

Under these circumstances, for the first time in a long, long time, maybe for the first time ever, BYU, even when it gets tripped up here and there, can build to consistently be what it’s rarely been in the past. Not just good, but real good.

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Kansas Forest Service on high alert as fire season reaches Sunflower State

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Kansas Forest Service on high alert as fire season reaches Sunflower State


WICHITA, Kan. (KWCH) – With increased fire danger throughout Kansas, fire departments across the state are preparing their teams to be on top of their game when it comes to life-and-property-saving efforts. As February rolls into March, the Kansas Forest Service expects a high probability of grass fires.

For local fire departments, the preparation includes ensuring that they have enough manpower to combat the flames.

“We have the potential to add extra staffing on specialized vehicles so that we have enough crews out there to respond to those emergencies,” Kansas Wildland Coordinator Brian Finan explained.

Dry grassland and wind are a couple of key contributors to the to threat prompting fire departments to prepare for the days ahead. Also critically important are mitigation efforts from homeowners in their communities.

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“Just be incredibly proactive and educate yourself in your community. Clear your yard debris,” said Saline County Emergency Management Deputy Director Alyssa Sanchez.

Other tips for property owners include reporting any indication of fire or smoke, cleaning gutters and clearing debris around structures.

For firefighters throughout Kansas, it’s essentially a waiting game in which they’re on standby until they’re called to fight windswept flames.

“We kind of forecast these things coming. Do we know the actual event is going to happen? No. There are still incidents that are going to rise up and we just deal with them as they present themselves,” said Kansas Forest Service Assistant Fire Management Officer Dennis Carlson.

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As Black History month ends, Wichita Democrat condemns racism in Kansas Statehouse – Kansas Reflector

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As Black History month ends, Wichita Democrat condemns racism in Kansas Statehouse – Kansas Reflector


TOPEKA — Rep. Ford Carr feels unseen.

The Wichita Democrat, who is one of eight Black lawmakers in the 165-member majority-white, majority-Republican Legislature, shared a letter on social media in which he vents frustration with bills he believes are harmful to Black communities. He is also critical of some of his colleagues’ actions.

“Racism in the Kansas Legislature is subtle but powerful,” Carr wrote. “They don’t even have to see us or acknowledge us. Our issues and positions are largely overlooked.”

“A racist ideology seems to be engrained in the foundation of most members of our Republican party,” Carr added.

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This isn’t the first time Carr has spoken out about racist policies.

Last April, Carr made a speech that called out vote trading, using slavery terms to describe Kansas City Democrat Rep. Marvin Robinson, who broke from party lines on several key issues. Robinson’s vote allowed Republicans to override Gov. Laura Kelly’s veto of a transgender athlete ban for K-12 schools and colleges, turning the legislation into law. In exchange, Republicans allocated funding in the state budget for a special project that Robinson wanted.

“I would never trade my vote so that those people in my neighborhood, my constituents that I support, would never have the opportunity to look at me and think that I might be one of those ‘house negroes,’ ” Carr said at the time, distinguishing between slaves who worked in the field and those who worked indoors.

Republican legislative leaders admonished Carr for indecorous behavior.

Carr posted a letter, dated Feb. 25, to social media in which he addresses “racist legislation” in light of Black History Month.

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He is concerned about House Bill 2583, which would increase jail time and fines for people who injure or kill police dogs and horses and attempt to flee police. Carr referenced the historical use of police dogs to harm people fighting for equality during the Civil Rights movement.

Senate Bill 36 would prohibit hairstyle discrimination in the workplace for styles such as braids, locs and twists. The bill fizzled in committee following a January hearing.

With medical marijuana legislation also up for debate, bills dictating licenses for plant growth and distribution should include provisions for minority-owned businesses, Carr added. 

Carr also accused House leadership of retaliating against him by denying him an intern. Carr said he was told he could not have an intern because of concerns that were posed to leadership, but that he was never told what these concerns were.

The spokeswoman for House leadership didn’t respond to inquiries for this story, and a spokesman for Senate leadership declined to comment.

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Carr referenced an occasion when white lawmaker Rep. Trevor Jacobs, a Fort Scott Republican, said he was sick of discussing racism because he isn’t racist.

“Pretty near every single bill that we do up here involves race or bigotry or whatever else,” Jacobs said in May of 2023 during House discussion of a police bill that would have increased penalties for people fleeing police officers. “I’m getting tired of being accused for that, for something I have not done and do not do and will not do. There’s no race in this. None. We’ve got to stop making it such a political ploy.”

Carr said he faces accusations of race-baiting or forcing the topic of race into conversations whenever he brings up concerns about how legislation would damage or disproportionately impact communities of color.

“Since taking office, I have worked diligently to scan every bill for racial components,” Carr said.

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