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Kansas basketball vs Samford officially set. Here’s time, date for NCAA tournament game

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Kansas basketball vs Samford officially set. Here’s time, date for NCAA tournament game


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LAWRENCE — Kansas basketball will open up its NCAA tournament stay with a round of 64 matchup against No. 13-seed Samford.

The No. 4-seed Jayhawks (22-10) are coming into March Madness on a two-game slide, and in recent weeks coach Bill Self’s squad has struggled to garner much of any momentum against Big 12 Conference opponents. Their most recent outing was a second-round loss in the Big 12 tournament against Cincinnati, a team that didn’t make the NCAA tournament. But all that matters now is how many wins they can put together as they chase the third national championship of the Self era at KU. And that starts against the Bulldogs.

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Kansas should have both graduate senior guard Kevin McCullar Jr. and senior center Hunter Dickinson back, after both missed the Big 12 tournament this past week due to injury. When the Jayhawks are healthy, they have one of the best — if not the best — starting fives in the nation. It’s just a matter of how far that group can take them.

Kansas basketball’s March Madness opponent is Samford to open 2024 NCAA tournament bracket

Why Kansas basketball could get upset and not reach Sweet 16 of 2024 NCAA tournament

What time does Kansas basketball play Samford in 2024 NCAA tournament?

Kansas plays Samford at 8:55 p.m. (CT) and it will be televised on TBS. The round of 64 matchup is going to be on Thursday in Salt Lake City.

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Jordan Guskey covers University of Kansas Athletics at The Topeka Capital-Journal. He is the National Sports Media Association’s sportswriter of the year for the state of Kansas for 2022. Contact him at jmguskey@gannett.com or on Twitter at @JordanGuskey.



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Kansas

Kansas Commit David McComb Shares Training Video

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Kansas Commit David McComb Shares Training Video


It is no secret that each commitment is a big piece of the puzzle in each recruiting class as cycles turn over every year. However, with that being said it is also no secret that some recruits can play a bigger part due to a plethora of different reasons.

I truly believe that Kansas has found its big piece to the 2025 puzzle and his name is David McComb.

McComb is a huge piece and the biggest piece to the puzzle not just because he is a signal-calling quarterback but because he brings many other things to the table such as leadership and also the domino effect.

The domino effect is referred to in the world of recruiting as a commit that leads to multiple commits or committable opportunities that likely were not available until the original piece (McComb) was placed.

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McComb is currently one of three commits following the addition of Anderson Kopp and also having Malachi Curvey already committed.

McComb is a 6-foot-3 210-pound quarterback from Memorial High School in Edmond, Oklahoma, and is what I personally consider an elite-level quarterback. I believe he is significantly underrated by all major recruiting services. Rivals has him listed as the 34th-best quarterback and I can confidently say… no one can convince me there are 33 better quarterbacks in this class.

McComb recently released a video of him throwing some passes during his own personal practice with 405QB (a private group training and quarterback development) company run by Joel Blumenthal who is the QB coach at Edmond North High School.

Below is the video of the work that he shared publicly.

Stay tuned for a more in-depth review of David McComb’s tape and skill set.

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Bass: Michigan, Kansas, Louisville among early portal winners, and more intel

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Bass: Michigan, Kansas, Louisville among early portal winners, and more intel


Transfers, hirings and firings … oh, my. With so many coaches bouncing around, not to mention 1,600-plus portalers, we have never seen a college basketball offseason like this. Since the transfer portal opened March 18, we have seen a plethora of entries, including Minnesota’s Elijah Hawkins, Kentucky’s Ugonna Onyenso, Oakland’s Trey Townsend, Texas Tech’s Pop Isaacs and Stetson’s Jalen Blackmon.

GO DEEPER

Ranking the best players in the NCAA men’s basketball transfer portal: Duke adds Gillis

But the best is yet to come.

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The portal closes May 1, as the NCAA shortened the process from 60 to 45 days. Several teams, including Auburn, Texas Tech, St. Johns, Alabama and Cal, need a dynamic point guard and a starting big man, and high-value players of each position group plan to enter or have already done so. Tennessee center Jonas Aidoo, Wisconsin guard Chucky Hepburn, Saint Mary’s guard Aidan Mahaney and SMU guard Zhuric Phelps are among the potential key players who entered the portal over the past two weeks. Some are All-America caliber players and made their respective all-conference teams.

Handlers and athletes are narrowing their choices down ahead of time and aren’t going through the motions of being courted on several visits, as was the norm a few years ago. Former Belmont guard Ja’Kobi Gillespie entered the portal on March 19 and found a new home at Maryland eight days later. Former Colorado center Eddie Lampkin took about six days before pledging to Syracuse. Former Virginia Tech center Lynn Kidd entered the portal March 25 and committed to Miami three days later.

Some teams like Houston only had one or two scholarships going into the offseason; after signing former Oklahoma guard Milos Uzan, the Cougars are now done portaling assuming no one decides to transfer out.

The ebbs and flows of Portalpalooza can be volatile. Some teams, like Drexel, didn’t lose a single player to the madness a year ago, while others like Louisville or Arizona State can’t seem to keep any of their guys from leaving.

A year ago, more than 1,800 men’s basketball players entered their names, and this offseason could see an even bigger number with the NCAA formally allowing for multi-time transfers. Meaning, if you picked a bad fit (again), you can just hop back in the portal and find another suitor.

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“I don’t see how you stop it, especially if they commit before August or before school starts in the fall,” said an ACC assistant coach, who was granted anonymity in exchange for his candor. “How can you rule all those multi-transfers ineligible? I don’t think it’s possible, so that’s why you’re seeing so many kids hop in the portal for the second or third time.”

As for some of the top guys already in the portal, these are the schools they’re hearing from:

• One of the country’s most underrated guards, former Minnesota’s Hawkins is hearing from Kentucky, Creighton, Texas Tech, Villanova, Pittsburgh and Florida State.

• Utah State transfer and reigning Mountain West player of the year Great Osobor has planned four visits, Kentucky (April 29-May 1), Louisville (May 1-3), Texas Tech (May 4-6) and Washington (May 7-9).

• Sources briefed on the discussions told The Athletic that former Oregon State guard Jordan Pope has heard from Miami, Florida, Baylor, Texas, Texas A&M, Kansas, Michigan, North Carolina and Arizona. He has already visited Texas (April 16-17) and Texas A&M (April 19). Expect the Pac-12’s fifth-leading scorer to make a decision soon. He will pick between rivals the Longhorns and the Aggies. How’s that for a throwback?

• Former Illinois State forward Myles Foster is receiving interest from Iowa, Xavier, Arizona State, San Diego State, DePaul, Florida and many others.

Early portal winners

UCLA: The Bruins have added four players: two-time transfer guard Skyy Clark (Illinois, Louisville), Pac-12 rival forward Tyler Bilodeau (Oregon State), across-the-street rival (USC) forward Kobe Johnson and former Oklahoma State forward Eric Dailey Jr.

Kansas: After his depleted Jayhawks team lost 89-68 to Gonzaga in the second round, coach Bill Self said, “For the last month I’ve been thinking about next season, to be honest.” And it’s obvious. Since the season ended, the Jayhawks have added Lawrence, Kansas, native Zeke Mayo (South Dakota State); former Florida guard Riley Kugel; and Wisconsin wing AJ Storr. A potential starting lineup of DaJuan Harris Jr., Mayo, Storr, KJ Adams and Hunter Dickinson is arguably the best starting five in the country.

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Indiana: After a disappointing 19-14 season, Mike Woodson is putting together quite the roster in Bloomington. The Hoosiers have added Pac-12 All-Freshman team selection Myles Rice (Washington State); one of the best bigs in the country in Oumar Ballo from Arizona; and a dynamic scoring guard in Kanaan Carlyle.

Like Kansas, the Hoosiers arguably have one of the best starting fives in the country, with returnees Mackenzie Mgbako and Malik Reneau rounding out the unit.

Louisville: Cardinals fans needed a win — actually, maybe a few — and new coach Pat Kelsey has brought over two of his players from Charleston in Reyne Smith and James Scott. Louisville also added Sun Belt Player of the Year Terrence Edwards Jr., who averaged 17.2 points per game at James Madison; two scoring guards in Pac-12 Sixth Man of the Year Koren Johnson (Washington) and J’Vonne Hadley (Colorado); and BYU center Aly Khalifa. Louisville has also hosted former four-star recruit and Washington transfer Wesley Yates and is the favorite to sign him.

Memphis: The Tigers had an up-and-down season in 2023-24. At one point, they were ranked in the Top 10 but failed to make the NCAA Tournament and passed on an NIT invitation. So far, they have picked up four transfers, starting with one of the nation’s best scorers, former Tulsa guard PJ Haggerty (21.2 ppg), as well as former Illinois forward Dain Dainja, guard Colby Rogers — who averaged 16.4 points per game at Wichita State — and two-time transfer guard Tyrese Hunter (Iowa State, Texas).

Michigan: Rising star coach Dusty May has put together an elite coaching staff that is quickly making the Wolverines one of the more intriguing teams going into the 2024-25 season. So far, they’ve added five transfers starting with big man in the middle Danny Wolf (Yale), followed by breakout candidate Roddy Gayle Jr. (Ohio State). Next, they added a pair of point guards in Rubin Jones (North Texas) and Tre Donaldson (Auburn). Lastly, they added one of my favorite and most intriguing prospects in the country for next season, Sam Walters from Alabama. The Wolverines aren’t done, either.

USC: New coach Eric Musselman has signed eight players (seven transfers and one top-50 recruit). The Trojans have hit the ground running, as all seven transfers averaged 11.6 points per game or more: Northern Colorado forward Saint Thomas (19.7 ppg), Bryce Pope (San Diego), Clark Slajchert (Penn), Josh Cohen (UMass), Rashaun Agee (Bowling Green), Matt Knowling (Yale) and my favorite addition of the group, Chibuzo Ago a mismatch nightmare from Boise State.

(Photo of Michigan coach Dusty May: Junfu Han / USA Today) 





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Here is where Kansas State football’s top 2024 NFL Draft prospects rank at their positions

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Here is where Kansas State football’s top 2024 NFL Draft prospects rank at their positions


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Barring a major surprise, don’t look for any Kansas State football players to go off the board Thursday in the opening round of the 2024 NFL Draft.

That said, as many as four Wildcats could hear their names called — including two in Friday’s second or third rounds — before it is all said and done on Saturday.

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The festivities get underway at 7 p.m. Thursday from Detroit, with ABC and the ESPN networks providing live television coverage. The second and third rounds take place starting at 6 p.m. Friday, with rounds 4-7 scheduled for 11 a.m. Saturday.

K-State offensive lineman Cooper Beebe and tight end Ben Sinnott both are likely to go Friday, while offensive lineman and defensive end/edge Khalid Duke are projected as possible Saturday selections. The mock drafts often provide the more accurate forecasts because they factor in runs at certain positions.

But another measuring stick is how the individual players stack up with other prospects in their respective position groups. So, here is a look at how several entities rank the Wildcats next to their peers and also overall in the draft class.

Note: Overall prospect ranking is not a prediction of the player’s draft position.

Where will Kansas State football TE Ben Sinnott go in 2024 NFL draft? Some projections

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Where will Kansas State football OL KT Leveston go in 2024 NFL draft? Some projections

Where will Kansas State football DE Khalid Duke go in 2024 NFL draft? Some projections

OG Cooper Beebe

ESPN: No. 2 guard, No. 79 overall

CBS Sports: No. 5 Interior OL (No. 3 guard), No. 81 overall

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WalterFootball: No. 5 guard (draft round 2-3)

Sporting News: No. 5 guard, No. 77 overall

It is interesting that Beebe’s overall rankings do not typically reflect his projected draft position of second or early third round. Also, some position rankings lump guards and centers together as interior linemen.

TE Ben Sinnott

CBS Sports: No. 2 tight end, No. 54 overall

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ESPN: No. 2 tight end, No. 94 overall

Sporting News: No. 3 tight end, No. 78 overall

WalterFootball: No. 4 tight end (draft round 3-4)

Sinnott’s stock has continued to go up, especially after a strong showing at the NFL Combine. But his draft ceiling most likely is early third round.

OL KT Leveston

ESPN: No. 12 guard, No. 194 overall

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WalterFootball: No. 21 tackle (draft round 3-5)

Sporting News: No. 20 guard, No. 216 overall

CBS Sports: No. 28 tackle, No. 315 overall

Leveston started at left tackle for K-State the past two seasons, but he may be better suited to play guard in the NFL, as reflected in some of the rankings.

DE/Edge/LB Khalid Duke

WalterFootball: No. 23 defensive end (draft round 4-6)

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ESPN: No. 25 edge, No. 237 overall

CBS Sports: No. 20 linebacker, No. 247 overall

Finding the right NFL fit will be important for Duke, who has been ranked variously as a defensive end, edge rusher or outside linebacker. His professional future, at least initially, will be as a pass rush specialist.

Arne Green is based in Salina and covers Kansas State University sports for the Gannett network. He can be reached at agreen@gannett.com or on Twitter at @arnegreen.



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