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10-Year-Old Boy Dies By Suicide After 'Horrific Bullying' At School, Parents Say They Raised Alarm 20 Times – News18

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10-Year-Old Boy Dies By Suicide After 'Horrific Bullying' At School, Parents Say They Raised Alarm 20 Times – News18


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The school district’s superintendent denied any bullying reports had ever been submitted by either the parents or boy. (@CollinRugg/X)

Sammy Teusch, a fourth-grader at Greenfield Intermediate School, was bullied right up until the night he died by suicide on May 5

A 10-year-old boy in the US state of Indiana killed himself after being subjected to “horrific bullying” at school, according to his family, who said they raised the alarm at least 20 times in the last year.

Sammy Teusch, a fourth-grader at middle school in the Midwestern state, was bullied right up until the night he died by suicide on May 5, according to his parents Sam and Nichole. “I held him in my arms,” his dad, Sam Teusch, was quoted as saying by The New York Post. “I did the thing no father should ever have to do, and any time I close my eyes, it’s all I can see.”

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Sammy’s parents said they complained to the school nearly 20 times about the bullying that started last year when he was in elementary school. “They were making fun of him for his glasses in the beginning, then on to make fun of his teeth. It went on for a long time,” his dad said. “He was beat up on the school bus, and the kids broke his glasses and everything,” he said. “I called the school, and I’m like, ‘What are you doing about this? It keeps getting worse, and worse, and worse,’” the dad claimed.

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Despite claims of relentless bullying, the school district’s superintendent denied any such reports had ever been submitted. However, the district authorities did acknowledge that the school’s administrators and counselor had regular talks with the family throughout the year. Sammy’s family asserted that their fears had been made clear. “They knew this was going on. They knew this was going on,” the dad said.

Sammy’s grandma was livid at the district claiming it has a zero-tolerance policy on bullying. ”That they can’t just say they have zero tolerance because that doesn’t mean there is zero tolerance about bullies, their zero tolerance means that they don’t have responsibility for it,” Cynthia Teusch told a local state outlet.

“People trust their kids to the school, but now that trust is breaking down.” The boy’s mom claimed her son took her life because of the constant bullying. According to the mom, the boy mentioned an unspecified incident in a bathroom last week which left him too afraid to go to school. “He was my little boy. He was my baby. He was the youngest one,” she was quoted as saying by The Post.





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Indiana

Here's what Tyrese Haliburton said about returning from injury

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Here's what Tyrese Haliburton said about returning from injury


INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Pacers All-NBA guard Tyrese Haliburton missed both Games 3 and 4 of the Eastern Conference Finals loss to the Celtics after he injured his hamstring in Game 2. However, that was not necessarily his choice.

The day after Game 2 he said he could barely walk. But by the morning of Game 3, he felt like he could play.

“I feel good,” Haliburton told his agents on a phone call. “I’m not going to lie to guys. I really don’t care what you say, I’m going to try to play.”

He said there was an organization wide meeting with his agents and the front office, and they did not allow him to play in Game 3. He said their job is to protect him from himself, and he is thankful that they helped him with that.

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“It’s definitely been frustrating but it is what it is,” Haliburton said.

He exited Game 2 with 3:44 left in the third quarter. But his injury didn’t happen then. He said the injury happened in the second quarter when he was guarding Al Horford. He got a lot of treatment at halftime to get ready for the second half and even missed the halftime meeting. But his hamstring was still bothering him in the second half.

“I knew when coach took me out in the third quarter that it was probably done,” Haliburton said.

Haliburton did make it clear that this is a new injury, not just a reaggravation of the hamstring injury he had in the regular season. It is to the same hamstring, but in a different spot. He also said that he was never really 100% from the first hamstring injury.

Halliburton averaged 18.7 points per game in the playoffs, the first postseason he played in. He also named to the All-NBA 3rd Team and was selected as an al-star for the second time of his career this season.

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Indiana sees big spike in voucher students from wealthy families – Inside INdiana Business

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Indiana sees big spike in voucher students from wealthy families – Inside INdiana Business


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(Indiana Lawyer file photo)

Indiana spent roughly $439 million on its voucher program for the 2023-24 school year as enrollment in private schools hit a record high, a surge driven in large part by students from wealthy families.

The figure represents a $127 million increase from the $311 million the state spent on its voucher program last year, according to the Choice Scholarship Program annual report released Friday. The number of participating students in 2023-24 increased by approximately 32% from 2022-23.

Additionally, the number of voucher students from households making more than $150,000 soared after lawmakers last year abolished most requirements for participation and raised income eligibility to 400% of the threshold to qualify for the federal free and reduced-price lunch program.

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Nearly 8,000 students in 2023-24 came from households making between $150,000 to $200,000 annually, up from around 2,800 in 2022-23 — an increase of 183%.

And the number of voucher students from households making more than $200,000 increased roughly tenfold, from 354 students in 2022-23 to about 3,700 in 2023-24.

The number of students from those two income brackets combined who used vouchers in 2023-24 increased by 8,495, representing just over half the total growth of about 16,720 students.

Among the other income brackets, around 2,000 more students came from families making up to $50,000; an additional 2,000 came from families making between $50,000-$100,000; and the number of students from families making between $100,000 to $150,000 grew by a little more than 4,000.

Critics of the voucher program warned last year that relaxing the income eligibility requirement would effectively subsidize students from wealthier families to attend private schools. Supporters, meanwhile, said relaxing eligibility would give parents more choices in their students’ education.

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Previous data showed that private school enrollment in Indiana was increasing, but not as quickly as the rate of voucher use, indicating that many students using vouchers this year had already been enrolled in private schools.

In a statement Friday on the voucher report, the Indiana State Teachers Association said the expansion funnels public funds “to those who can already afford private schools.”

“Public schools, which serve 90% of Hoosiers’ children, are open and nondiscriminatory, providing essential services and a common foundation for our diverse communities,” the ISTA said. “Vouchers undermine this public good by siphoning limited funds to private schools that lack accountability and do not serve all students equitably.”

The report notes that had all 70,000 voucher students attended their public schools, the state would have paid around $516 million in public school funding. However, the majority of Choice Scholarship students have never attended a public school.

Voucher students made up around 6.1% of enrollment statewide in 2023-24, according to the report, up from around 4.7% the year before.

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The average voucher student in Indiana is a white, elementary-aged girl who lives in a metropolitan area and comes from a household of around 4.7 people making around $100,000, according to the report.

An additional 14 schools participated in the program in 2023-24, the most of any year of the program.

Chalkbeat is a not-for-profit news site covering educational change in public schools.

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Indiana baseball celebrates NCAA tournament bid after 48 hours on the bubble

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Indiana baseball celebrates NCAA tournament bid after 48 hours on the bubble


BLOOMINGTON — Indiana baseball coach Jeff Mercer went through a range of emotions during the 48 hours leading up to the NCAA’s tournament selection show on Monday afternoon. 

The roller coaster ended with overwhelming relief when the Hoosiers found out at the top of the hour-long broadcast they earned an at-large bid and a No. 3 seed in the Knoxville Regional alongside Tennessee, Southern Miss and Northern Kentucky. 

Indiana (32-24-1) will open the tourney with a game against Southern Miss at 1 p.m. on Friday. 

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“You feel a sense of joy,” Mercer said, with a smile. 

More: Indiana baseball earns NCAA tournament bid, will play in Knoxville Regional

Indiana baseball puts exit interviews on hold  

That joy was in stark contrast to the mood in Indiana’s visiting clubhouse after dropping a pair of games to Nebraska in the Big Ten tournament semifinals on Saturday. 

After the night cap, Mercer delivered what he thought was a season-ending speech to his players that included shoutouts to the team’s upperclassmen. 

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“I felt over the last several weeks if we won a (regular season) series at Nebraska, swept Michigan or if we got to the championship of the Big Ten tournament, that would nail it down,” Mercer said, during a Zoom press conference on Monday. “We kept coming up one game short of getting where we could be 100% confident.”

It wasn’t until Mercer dug a little deeper into the numbers — IU finished the season with a No. 56 ranked RPI and No. 39 strength of schedule — that he started to feel a bit better about the team’s chances. 

The results from the various conference championship games on Sunday fueled IU’s postseason hopes as well. 

“I think there were only two stolen bids and there could have been four or five really easily,” Mercer said. “Once those things broke our way, I thought we had a real chance to be in.”

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Mercer still ended up preparing for both scenarios. He was ready to hold exit interviews with his players on Monday if they didn’t earn a tournament bid, but he had a practice plan ready to go as well. 

Those exit interviews will have to wait for another day. 

Knoxville Regional is a tough assignment for Indiana baseball

Indiana baseball’s first test will be a red hot Southern Miss team. The Golden Eagles have won six straight and 14 of their last 15 games. The win streak includes Sunday’s 14-11 comeback victory over Georgia Southern in the Sun Belt conference championship game. 

It was the team’s second consecutive tournament title. The latest came in dramatic fashion with Southern Miss erasing an 11-9 deficit in the ninth inning.

While Mercer’s assistants handle much of the prep work for the regional, he watched Southern Miss on Sunday since Georgia Southern was a team that could have stolen an at-large bid. 

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“They don’t strike out, they don’t walk a ton, probably a lot like Rutgers,” Mercer said. “High batting average, singles and doubles, a lot of early contact and swings.” 

Designated hitter Slade Wilks does give Southern Miss some pop in the middle of the order. Wilks led the team with 14 home runs this season and has the fifth most in program history for his career (46). 

He hit .329 this season, had 35 extra-base hits and 65 RBIs. He enters the NCAA tournament riding a 32-game hit streak. 

The other early topic of conversation amongst the staff was Southern Miss pitcher Billy Oldham, who could be the team’s starter on Friday. Oldham earned first team All-Sun Belt honors this season with a 7-2 record with a 3.97 ERA and 96 strikeouts. He only gave up more than three earned runs in three of his 15 starts. 

“Throws 88-92 with a good changeup and breaking ball,” Mercer said. 

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Indiana will also start scouting Tennessee, the tourney’s No. 1 overall seed, and Northern Kentucky as well. 

Northern Kentucky will be the easier scout since the team’s played earlier this season — IU won the 11-5 on March 6 — and Mercer is close friends with many members of the team’s coaching staff. 

Tennessee is hosting the regional after winning the SEC tournament. The Volunteers beat defending national champion LSU for its second title in three seasons.



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