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It's Wasp Season In Illinois: Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Kill Them

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It's Wasp Season In Illinois: Here’s Why You Shouldn’t Kill Them


I have very little trouble admitting that I’ve killed more than a few wasps in my time. I’ve always had a live and let live relationship with bees, but wasps have always been on my kill-on-sight list.

I even went so far as to order the most souped-up electric bug-zapping racket I could find on Amazon. This thing is a one touch-one corpse gadget, and it has left a pile of wasp bodies in its wake, let me tell you. I also added the salt shooting “Bug-A-Salt” gun to my backyard arsenal. Think of it as a shotgun that fires table salt that obliterates insect pests.

Bug-A-Salt, Facebook

Bug-A-Salt, Facebook

Dead wasps The concept of a tired worker

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This is what happens when you bring a stinger to a salt-gun fight. (Getty Images)

It Turns Out That Wasps Do A Lot Of Good. Really.

So what good are these things that offer up painful stings, build nests under our eaves and decks, and seemingly do little else besides buzz around you and your family while you’re trying to enjoy a night on the patio?

A piece up at ThoughtCo.com says that wasps of all sorts offer some great ecological benefits like “pollination, predation, and parasitism.” I know what the first two are, but the last one sounds like a word that describes many politicians.

Wasps are apparently interested in more things than just stinging us:

For instance, paper wasps carry caterpillars and leaf beetle larvae back to their nests to feed their growing young. Hornets provision their nests with all manner of live insects to sate the appetites of their developing larvae. It takes a lot of bugs to feed a hungry brood, and it’s through these needs that both hornets and paper wasps provide vital pest control services.

Gallic polist forages a flower in summer.

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So, wasps handle some of the much-needed pollination jobs, and they kill and eat all sorts of pests like caterpillars, spiders, and aphids. However, they are temperamental and territorial, and will happily sting you.

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I’m not going to apologize for the ones I’ve “removed from the game,” but maybe I might not be so quick to grab my zapping racket and Bug-A-Salt gun in the future.

LOOK: 20 of the biggest insects in the world

Stacker compiled a list of 20 of the biggest insects in the world using a variety of news, scientific, and other sources.

Gallery Credit: Andrea Vale

LOOK: 20 of the strangest natural phenomena in America

From fire rainbows to bioluminescent bays, America is home to some truly bizarre natural phenomena. See Stacker’s list of 20 of the strangest natural phenomena in the U.S.

Gallery Credit: Martha Sandoval





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Illinois

Illinois State Police Release Results of Alcohol Countermeasures in Whiteside and Winnebago Counties

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Illinois State Police Release Results of Alcohol Countermeasures in Whiteside and Winnebago Counties


Illinois State Police (ISP) Troop 1 Commander, Captain Joseph Blanchette, announces the results of Alcohol Countermeasure Enforcement (ACE) patrols in Whiteside and Winnebago counties during May. These ACE patrols allowed the ISP to focus on preventing, detecting, and taking enforcement action in response to violations associated with impaired driving and illegal transportation or consumption of alcohol or drugs.

Violations Enforcement Activity

Driving Under the Influence (DUI) Citations 3

Other Alcohol/Drug Citations 3

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Occupant Restraint Offenses 19

Registration Offenses 7

Driver’s License Offenses 10

Insurance Violations 5

Total Citations 65

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Total Arrests 8

Total Written Warnings 43

Alcohol and drug impairment are estimated to be a factor in more than 47% of all fatal motor vehicle crashes in Illinois.

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Tribe Could Get Land Stolen by US Government Back

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Tribe Could Get Land Stolen by US Government Back


Some 175 years after the US government stole land from the chief of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation while he was away visiting relatives, Illinois may return it to the tribe. Nothing ever changed the 1829 treaty that Chief Shab-eh-nay signed with the US to preserve for him a reservation in northern Illinois—not subsequent accords nor the 1830 Indian Removal Act, which forced all Indigenous people to move west of the Mississippi. But around 1848, the US sold the land to white settlers while Shab-eh-nay and other members of his tribe were visiting family in Kansas. To right the wrong, Illinois would transfer a 1,500-acre state park west of Chicago, the AP reports.

The state would continue providing maintenance while the tribe says it wants to keep the park as it is. “The average citizen shouldn’t know that title has been transferred to the nation so they can still enjoy everything that’s going on within the park and take advantage of all of that area out there,” said Joseph “Zeke” Rupnick, chairman of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation based in Mayetta, Kansas. It’s not entirely the same soil that the US took from Chief Shab-eh-nay. The boundaries of his original 1,280-acre reservation now encompass hundreds of acres of privately owned land, a golf course, and a county forest preserve. Pending Illinois legislation would transfer the Shabbona Lake State Recreation Area.

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No one disputes Shab-eh-nay’s reservation was illegally sold and still belongs to the Potawatomi. But nothing has changed. Democratic state Rep. Will Guzzardi, who sponsored the legislation, said the deal is a significant concession on the part of the Potawatomi. With various private and public concerns now owning most of the original reservation land, reclaiming it for the Potawatomi would set up a serpentine legal wrangle. “Instead, the tribe has offered a compromise, which is to say, ‘We’ll take the entirety of the park and give up our claim to the private land and the county land and the rest of that land,’” Guzzardi said. “That’s a better deal for all parties involved.” The transfer won Illinois Senate approval, but a snag in the House prevented its passage. Proponents will seek the endorsement when the Legislature returns in November.

(More Illinois stories.)





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11 Coziest Towns to Visit in Illinois in 2024

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11 Coziest Towns to Visit in Illinois in 2024


Illinois’ towns beyond the cities offer unspoiled Midwest charm. While places like Chicago and their cultural hubs draw worldwide acclaim, there truly is no place more comforting than a quaint rural community tucked amidst fields, woodlands, and inland rivers. In 2024, consider going against the grain and veering off the major highway to explore overlooked destinations where tight-knit spirit and rustic allure fuse into genuine coziness.

Whether shopping for souvenirs in antique shops along sleepy main drags, or enjoying the kindred company of locals in cafes and taverns, meandering these hidden hamlets promises a return to simpler pleasures. From historic river borders to artistic enclaves nestled in conservation areas, exploring the coziest towns in Illinois ensures relaxation and rejuvenation amid lush nature and friendly locals.

Geneva

Overlooking Island Park in Geneva, Illinois.

This Kane County community and western Chicago suburb offers a balanced mix of attractions to ensure something for all visitors. Geneva has various park spaces for those who enjoy outdoor environments, including the 385-acre Peck Farm Park, home to picnic areas, hiking trails, an amphitheater, and a nature center. Meanwhile, the Geneva History Museum provides background on the town through a vast artifact collection and interactive exhibits to entertain younger visitors.

However, you can combine your love for nature and history by visiting the Fabyan Mills Museum and Japanese Garden. Set on the western bank of the Fox River, this idyllic area harbors a 1907 Frank Lloyd Wright mansion surrounded by a lush and gorgeous Japanese Garden.

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Nauvoo

Downtown Nauvoo, Illinois
Downtown Nauvoo, Illinois. Image credit: Ken Lund via Flickr.com

Nauvoo was the historic headquarters of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. This town is jam-packed with historic structures and landmarks depicting the modest beginnings of the church, delivering an unforgettable trip down memory lane. Newcomers are quick to notice the Nauvoo Illinois Temple, which dominates the skyline with a grandiose stature and gorgeous old-world architecture. Strolling through Historic Nauvoo, you will discover an impressive mix of historic structures, including the Joseph Smith Historic Site, where the church’s founder resided.

But Nauvoo offers more than history; it is an excellent escape for ardent outdoorsmen. The town also houses Nauvoo State Park, a 148-acre preserve along the Mississippi River with recreation opportunities for hikers, boaters, campers, and nature viewers.

Woodstock

Downtown Woodstock, Illinois.
Downtown Woodstock, Illinois.

Fun annual festivals and unique history draw tourists to this suburban community in McHenry Country. Woodstock has a quaint downtown district, and exploring the Woodstock Square Historic District exposes you to landmark sites like the Woodstock Opera House. With a legacy stretching back to the 19th century, the venue is a recognized performance art hub. The town center comes to life during the Woodstock Farmer’s Market, as regional growers and traditional crafters display an eclectic mix of fresh produce and cultural crafts.

Woodstock’s charm spreads beyond the downtown core; the Dufield Pond Conservation Area beckons adventurers to make the most of fishing and hiking opportunities. The institution’s 7-acre lake hosts a decent population of bluegill and largemouth bass.

Rockton

George H. Hollister House in the Rockton Historic District
George H. Hollister House in the Rockton Historic District

This Rock River Valley enclave delights visitors with its historical experiences and outdoor adventures. The Rockton Township Historical Society provides a detailed account of the region’s history, exhibiting an exhilarating collection of archives and artifacts. More history awaits discovery at the Macktown Living History Education Center, which offers a window to the town’s formative years when the first settlers established their homes.

Outdoor recreation abounds at the J. Norman Forest Preserve, which delivers scenic vistas of the Rock River. Adventures immerse you in the wilderness through hiking, camping, fishing, and picnicking. Alternatively, a low-key game of golf at Macktown Golf Course excites any outdoorsy visitor to Rocktown.

Galena

Main Street in Galena, Illinois
Main Street in Galena, Illinois, USA. Editorial credit: Wirestock Creators / Shutterstock.com

This well-preserved 19th-century village is among the best towns in Illinois for tourists with an affinity for nostalgic experiences. Galena harbors a quaint historic district with a scenic downtown skyline exhibiting the best of old-world architecture. The U.S. Grant Home State Historic Site is an excellent example of classic Italianate architecture. Despite its modest looks, it preserves rich local heritage, featuring the childhood home of President Ulysses S. Grant. The Desoto House Hotel further increases the town’s rustic charm. With a legacy beginning in 1855, it continues to serve tourists in the town, delivering a unique accommodation experience.

Going through all the historic sites might dominate your itinerary for the better part of the day. However, visitors can save time and experience as many of them as possible by booking a tour on the Galen Trolley, which takes visitors on narrated sightseeing trips around the historic downtown.

Fulton

De Immigrant Windmill in Fulton, Illinois
De Immigrant Windmill in Fulton, Illinois. Image credit: EJRodriquez – stock.adobe.com.

Unique European heritage and cozy outdoor scenery make this Mississippi River town a worthwhile stop on any Illinois itinerary. Fulton is steeped in Dutch culture, which is evident when strolling through its quiet town streets. From its unique architecture to its exciting cultural centers, it delivers an immersive cultural experience. De Immigrant Windmill decorates the skyline with its majestic stature, exhibiting authentic Dutch craftsmanship using an authentic Dutch windmill. There is even more local heritage to uncover at the tiny yet insightful Martin House Museum. It houses artifacts and memorabilia that take you back to the Civil War period.

Beyond the history and culture, Fulton boasts exquisite outdoor scenery, considering its location along the Mississippi River. Many tourists resort to a hike along the Great River Trail to soak in the amazing water views while stretching their legs and keeping active.

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Galesburg

Main Street in Galesburg, Illinois
Main Street in Galesburg, Illinois. Image credit: David Wilson via Flickr.com.

Galesburg’s storied heritage intertwines with the Underground Railroad, where it served as a notable stop along the route. The town has always been a prominent railway throughout its history, a legacy well-preserved at the Galesburg Railroad Museum. Housed inside is a mix of related artifacts telling the town’s transportation history. Galesburg is also the birthplace of celebrated author Carl Sandburg. It honors its famous song with the Carl Sandburg State Historic Site, where guests learn about his life’s work and undying impact on the literary world.

A wide array of antique stores, including the Galesburg Antique Mall, encourage you to cap off your historical experience by bagging a vintage souvenir. This three-story establishment ensures there is something for everyone thanks to a vast antique collection.

Greenville

Greenville, Illinois, United States
Greenville, Illinois, United States. Editorial credit: Jon Rehg / Shutterstock.com

Greenville takes great pride in its rich heritage, which shows through the vast mix of museums across its downtown region. If you love retro experiences, the town promises a jam-packed experience featuring stops at notable attractions like the American Farm Heritage Museum. This open-air museum displays various farm implements and machinery, some from 100 years back. Meanwhile, the Bond County Museum focuses on the local heritage and harbors a variety of artifacts, memorabilia, and relics chronicling the history of the communities occupying the surrounding region.

Another noteworthy landmark, especially for the artistically inclined, is the Richard W. Bock Sculpture Museum. This quaint facility, housed in a 19th-century building, exhibits around 300 sculptures by the celebrated artist.

Oglesby

Starved Rock Lodge in Oglesby, Illinois
Starved Rock Lodge in Oglesby, Illinois

If you crave an escape into the great outdoors, there is no better place to be than Oglesby. This small LaSalle County village harbors a sprawling wilderness area with plentiful park spaces. However, Starved Rock State Park is easily its crowning jewel. Straddling over 2,600 acres, this recreation hub entices travelers from across the state, spoiling them with exciting activities like fishing, wildlife viewing, hiking, and boating. More outdoor adventures await across the wild territory of Matthiessen State Park. Boating a series of waterfalls and creeks, this institution has a chill environment ideal for campers.

However, you won’t be spending all your vacation immersed in the open spaces. After a tedious adventure that requires you to stock up and refresh, make the most of Olesby’s delectable dining scene by popping into the Rootbeer Stand.

Elmhurst

A windmill in Elmhurst, Illinois.
A windmill in Elmhurst, Illinois.

Elmhurst has an infectious vibe that keeps bringing tourists back for exciting social interactions. Home to Elmhurst University, the town enjoys a bustling arts community, which offers visual and performance art experiences at venues like the Elmhurst Art Center. Elsewhere, the Elmhurst History Museum chronicles the town’s rich past by displaying rotating exhibits about different historical topics. Additionally, visitors can gather more useful information about Elmhurst, and all it offers at the Elmhurst Public Library.

Stepping outside, Elmhurst impresses with its easy going outdoor environment. This is especially true for Glos Memorial Park, which features a delightful pergola with a seating area ideal for relaxing and people-watching.

Quincy

Downtown street in Quincy, Illinois.
Downtown street in Quincy, Illinois. Image credit Sabrina Janelle Gordon via Shutterstock

Illinois’ “Gem City” exudes historic ambiance that lures travelers into covering the rich heritage it is synonymous with. This is evident from the numerous historical markers dotting the town, which the Quincy Museum best summarizes. Housed inside a 19th-century building, period furnishings, and artifacts transport guests back to the bygone eras. Additionally, Quincy has one of the most impressive arts communities in the region. It is a recognized hub for regional creatives and presents several art centers, from the lively Quincy Community Theater to the quaint Quincy Art Center.

However, if you prefer to spend your time exploring the outdoors, Quincy has a cute little space you can visit for a change of scenery. The Lyn Deer is a 5-acre habitat for various wildlife species, allowing guests to encounter friendly species like deer and peafowl.

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Wrapping Up

Whether exploring heritage along rivers like the Illinois river and Rock river, meandering through charming small towns amidst forests and farms, or taking in small-knit community spirit in former boom towns, visitors to these eleven cozy towns in Illinois can expect respite through quintessential Midwest hospitality and scenic charm. Nestled across the landscape, each offers a refuge to escape urban crowds and explore within historic main streets, explore local haunts, and interact with compassionate locals, cultivating true small-town coziness.



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