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Cicadas may emerge earlier in Illinois as climate changes, experts say

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Cicadas may emerge earlier in Illinois as climate changes, experts say


As Illinois awaits a massive, rare double-brood emergence of cicadas, entomological research shows that the insects may come earlier.

This year, two ‘periodical’ cicada species—Brood XIII and Brood XIX— will emerge simultaneously. Maps of Illinois show where each brood is expected to flourish. 

According to Jennifer Rydzewski of the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County, brood XIII occurs in the Chicago area only every 17 years, while Brood XIX occurs every 13 years.

“So the 13-year and 17-year life cycles only align every 221 years,” Rydzewski told CBS Chicago in an e-mail.

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“Periodical cicadas have typically emerged in late May or early June in northern Illinois,” said Dr. Ken Johnson of the University of Illinois. However, because of the urban heat island, that might happen earlier in Chicago. 

How will cicada behavior change? 

But as Chicago bakes in its third-warmest year on record, is a species directly cued by soil temperatures warming to 64 degrees being affected by the warming climate? Some cicadas were reported last week in the northwest suburbs. 

According to the University of Connecticut’s Climate Change and Periodical Cicadas, “All available evidence indicates that the climate is warming and precipitation patterns are changing, and because some parts of the periodical cicada life cycle seem sensitive to these factors, it follows that these insects will be affected by climate change.”

That study predicts that warming climates will cause periodical cicada emergences to start earlier in the year since spring will arrive earlier as the climate warms. Climate-related disruption of the cues periodical cicadas use to pick their year of emergence will lead to an increase in unexpected, oddly-timed emergences or even the breakdown of these insects’ periodicity. 

The study mentions notable off-cycle emergences have already occurred, such as the unexpected emergence of Brood X cicadas in 2017.

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“It’s possible we are a few days ahead of schedule this year due to the warming climate, but we definitely need more data and analysis,” Dr. Catherine Dana of the Illinois Natural History Survey said.

Periodical cicadas’ long life cycles and rare emergences make gathering that data a lengthy process – but the periodical cicada mapping project is trying to accomplish that goal.

However, as the Connecticut study states, “It will take a while to collect the data, and the project involves multiple generations… of cicadas and researchers alike.”

How long will cicadas be around in Illinois?

Periodical cicadas spend most of their time living underground, feeding on tree roots. Once the soil warms enough, they begin to emerge above ground.

According to the University of Illinois, adult cicadas spend most of their time above ground reproducing. Male cicadas start singing four or five days after they emerge.

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After mating, the female cicadas will lay their eggs, about 500 to 600 each.

The adult cicadas will begin to die after about a month. That should happen before outdoor Ravinia Festival concerts kick into high gear. 

When will periodical cicadas emerge again in Illinois after 2024?

About six to ten weeks after they are laid, the eggs begin to hatch. The tiny cicada nymphs drop to the ground and begin feeding, often on grass roots.

Eventually, they dig into the soil about 8 to 12 inches deep and feed on tree roots for 13 to 17 years.

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Illinois

Halbrook, House Celebrate 150th Anniversary Of The Founding Of Strasburg, Illinois

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Halbrook, House Celebrate 150th Anniversary Of The Founding Of Strasburg, Illinois


Springfield, IL-(Effingham Radio)- State Representative Brad Halbrook this week led the Illinois House in celebrating the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Village of Strasburg.

 

Many of Strasburg’s first settlers in the 1860’s and 1870’s were of German origin. They were joined by a number of Pennsylvania Dutch in the 1880’s; all drawn by the area’s rich soil and plentiful water from tributaries to the Richland Creek. Strasburg will officially celebrate its anniversary June 14-June 16.

 

“This is truly a milestone –150 years of hard work, self-discipline, and true care and concern for neighbors have bult a thriving community that we are all very proud of,” Rep. Halbrook said.

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This week the House unanimously passed House Resolution 805, congratulating Strasburg officials and residents on 150 years of progress.  Rep. Halbrook introduced Strasburg Town Councilmen Robert “Bob” Anderson and Dr. Ian Kinkley who watched from the House gallery as he presented the resolution.

 

“Illinois has so much to offer; and communities like Strasburg are at the top of the list,” Rep. Halbrook said.



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Bill overhauling Illinois child labor laws heads to Pritzker’s desk

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Bill overhauling Illinois child labor laws heads to Pritzker’s desk


SPRINGFIELD (WGEM) – A bill overhauling Illinois’ child labor laws is heading to Gov. JB Pritzker’s desk. The state Senate voted unanimously to approve the amended House version of the bill.

The House passed the bill with bipartisan support Tuesday.

The bill would substantially update the state’s child labor laws for the first time in nearly 75 years.

An initiative of the Illinois Department of Labor, agency officials argue piecemeal changes over the years have created outdated, conflicting and disjointed provisions in state law.

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“Were trying to just create a whole new bill, gut and replace it, and allow for an easier new way to manage the bill and understand and so employers and everyone else can understand it. I think right now it just creates a lot of unnecessary misunderstandings for a bill that is very important in protecting the vulnerable,” said state Rep. Barbara Hernandez, D-Aurora, the bill’s House sponsor.

The bill would ban kids from working in jobs not covered 75 years ago. Those include working in cannabis shops and adult entertainment facilities.

It also limits the number of hours kids 15 and younger can work weekly to 18 hours during school weeks and 40 hours when school is not in session.

“We want them continue providing a great resource to our community and hopefully become that future doctor and so on, but we need to protect them now in those first jobs that they have,” Hernandez said.

The bill also adds protections for children in the film industry.

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State Rep. Dan Ugaste, R-Geneva, opposed the bill. He was highly critical of the bill not having exceptions for businesses owned by the child’s parent.

“This bill goes over the top,” Ugaste said. “It has limitations on hours and other things that don’t need to be as drastic as they are. I don’t mind revising this law to the extend it needs it but this, as it’s written, is an overreach.”

The bill does have exceptions allowing kids under 16 to work on their family’s farm.



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Rogers pitches Michigan to 4-2 victory over top-seeded Illinois for spot in Big Ten semifinal

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Rogers pitches Michigan to 4-2 victory over top-seeded Illinois for spot in Big Ten semifinal


OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Will Rogers finished one out shy of a complete game to lead No. 4 seed Michigan to a 4-2 victory over top-seeded Illinois on Friday night for a berth in the Big Ten Tournament semifinals.

Michigan (32-27) will play No. 8 seed Penn State the semifinals Saturday and will have to beat the Nittany Lions twice to advance to Sunday’s championship game. Penn State beat Michigan 9-5 on Thursday. Nebraska and Indiana square off in the first semifinal with the Cornhuskers needing two wins over the Hoosiers to advance.

The Wolverines grabbed a 1-0 lead in the top of the third inning after No. 9 batter Brock Leitgeb led off with a walk and scored on a single by Stephen Hrustich.

Michigan led 2-0 in the fifth after Mitch Voit tripled and scored on a double by Hrustich.

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Caruso and Rogers had back-to-back doubles leading off the eighth inning to make it 3-0 and the Wolverines’ final run came on Voit’s solo home run in the ninth.

Rogers took a shutout into the ninth before running into trouble. He sandwiched a pair of fly outs around a walk to Connor Milton, but Camden Janik tripled in a run and scored on a Drake Westcott single to end his night. Dylan Vique induced a ground out from the first batter he faced to finish off the victory with his first save of the season.

Rogers (2-4) yielded two runs on three hits and two walks, striking out nine.

Payton Hutchings was saddled with the loss for the Fighting Illini (34-19). He pitched 4 1/3 innings, surrendering two runs on three hits and five walks.

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