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Freighter takes on water after hitting underwater object in Lake Superior: Coast Guard

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A 689-foot freighter began taking on water Saturday morning after the massive ship hit an underwater obstacle in Lake Superior near Grand Portage, Minnesota, forcing about half of the 22 people on board to evacuate, the U.S. Coast Guard said. 

The Michipicoten, which was carrying taconite, a low-grade iron ore, was around 35 miles southwest of Isle Royale when it began flooding. Isle Royale is part of Michigan.

The Coast Guard said that there was no sign anything spilled into the water from the ship as pumps on board worked to displace the water and reduce the ship’s listing from 15 degrees to 5 degrees. 

CRUISE PASSENGER FALLS OVERBOARD WHILE SHIP SAILS THROUGH FJORD: OFFICIALS

A 689-foot freighter ship, right, began taking on water Saturday morning after it hit an underwater obstacle in Lake Superior, forcing about half of the 22 people on board to evacuate, the U.S. Coast Guard said.  (Jeff Leech via Facebook)

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The Michipicoten was headed to port for repairs with the bulk carrier Edwin H. Gott alongside it. 

UNDERWATER EXPLORER DIVING ON ‘NEWLY FOUND SHIPWRECK’ DISCOVERED DEAD IN LAKE ERIE, AUTHORITIES SAY

The ship heading back to shore

The Michipicoten, right, heading to port for repairs with the bulk carrier Edwin H. Gott, left, alongside it.  (Jeff Leech via Facebook)

U.S. Coast Guard, Border Patrol, and National Park Service vessels remain actively involved, the Coast Guard said. 

The cause of the collision is under investigation. 

Lake Superior

Lake Superior is the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area. (Brian Peterson/Star Tribune via Getty Images)

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The collision occurred in the northwest part of the lake, which straddles the U.S.-Canadian border and is the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Detroit, MI

Detroit police commissioners raise concerns over lack of body cameras worn by officers

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Detroit police commissioners raise concerns over lack of body cameras worn by officers


(CBS DETROIT) — The Detroit Board of Police Commissioner has some serious concerns. One commissioner said situations continue to arise involving officers not wearing their body cams or turning them off.  

“It needs to be an increase in supervisors’ review as well as continuing audits of the body-worn cameras,” Commissioner Willie Burton told CBS News Detroit.

Burton alleges that the board continues to see concerns about body cameras not being worn. He said the most recent instance happened at a recent pro-Palestinian protest after a lieutenant was heard telling a woman to go back to Mexico.

“But there have been other situations where there’s a peaceful protest in the City of Detroit where officers weren’t wearing body-worn cameras a few years back, so now it’s becoming a growing issue,” Burton said.

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Detroit police first began wearing body cameras in 2016 as part of a pilot program. CBS News Detroit is told that having officer interactions visually on record can clear many misunderstandings. 

“It really puts us in a tough spot when it comes to lawsuits and things of that nature. All of this can be preventable if we just ensure that our supervisors are getting on the members,” Burton said.

With over 2,000 officers, Burton alleges some officers have been repeat offenders by not wearing their cameras. He’s unclear, though, on how often audits are conducted on body cameras.

“We do have good officers on this force. Some just don’t want to adhere to the policy,” he said.

Live: so we were hoping to interview someone from the department to clear things up.

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CBS News Detroit asked the Detroit Police Department about the concerns from Burton. The department issued the following statement:

“The Department is aware of the concern raised by the Board of Police Commissioners regarding a failure on the part of some officers to activate their body cameras. While the Board has raised these concerns, the Department is not aware of any systemic issues related to non-use of body cameras amongst its personnel. Those who are found not using their body cameras are subject to corrective action. Moreover, as each officer on a car is mandated to wear a body-worn camera, in instances where one member fails to activate his or her camera, footage is captured by the other member’s device.

“The Department has invested millions of dollars in body-worn camera technology. Every member is issued a camera, and the Department has instituted strong policy mandating their use. While prior audits and inspections have not revealed any form of widespread patterns of non-use, the Department will conduct an audit of BWC compliance in an effort to be responsive to the Board’s concern on this issue.”

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Milwaukee, WI

Bids to build the new juvenile prison in Milwaukee are in. What happens next? | Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service

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Bids to build the new juvenile prison in Milwaukee are in. What happens next? | Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service


This property at 7930 W. Clinton Ave. – an old vehicle emissions inspection center – has been selected as the site for the new juvenile correctional facility in Milwaukee. (NNS file photo by Edgar Mendez)

Milwaukee’s long-awaited new juvenile prison has reached another milestone in the years-long construction process.

The end of bidding for contractors to construct the new prison inches the state toward the fulfillment of state law and the closure of Lincoln Hills School for Boys, a Type 1 juvenile correctional facility, the most secure type of juvenile correctional facility in the Wisconsin Department of Corrections system. 

A goal of building the prison in Milwaukee is to have youths who are incarcerated remain in their communities, as stated by Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers’ in a news release. While there is neighborhood opposition to the new prison, those in favor say that it will better support Milwaukee youths in this way.  

Bidding ends

Bidding by potential general prime contractors to build the prison ended on May 22.  

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It’s “usually several weeks” before a successful bidder is selected, assuming there is one, Tatyana Warrick, communications director for the Wisconsin Department of Administration, said in an email.

“Contracts are awarded to the lowest bidder who is a qualified and responsible bidder that results in the lowest total construction cost for the project,” she said. 

After a contractor is selected and contracts finalized, groundbreaking can take place. 

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The project’s completion date is estimated to be summer of 2026, but the actual date will be set in the construction contract with the contractor, Warrick said. 

When complete, the prison will accommodate approximately 32 boys and employ approximately 70 staff, according to the Department of Corrections. 

Residents’ reactions

The site for the new prison is located on the North Side, at 7930 W. Clinton Ave., the former site of an emissions testing center.

Although the site was approved by the Milwaukee Common Council and Milwaukee Mayor Cavalier Johnson, some residents are not pleased. 

Many of their concerns revolve around the perceived risks to nearby residences and businesses posed by a prison in the area.

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During a City Plan Commission meeting in December 2022, for example, Margaret Thorn, a nearby resident and block watch captain, expressed safety-related concerns, saying that her house has been broken into twice.

“And what that does to an individual frazzles you,” she said. “They take your stuff but what they give you is fear. And it’s a fear that you can’t get rid of.”

Thorn and her neighbors are unhappy about “this facility being crammed down our throats,” she said.  

Kathy Fulfer, who has lived in the area her whole life, told NNS that “It used to be a lovely place to live with new investments and development. Unfortunately, there has been little positive growth on the far Northwest Side of Milwaukee in many years.”

The proximity to friends and family “will be great for the prisoners, not so great for the surrounding community who have had it forced upon them,” she added. 

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Keeping youths closer to home

At the same December commission meeting, Milwaukee County Circuit Judge Judge Lena Taylor, who was then a state senator, disputed the common arguments about negative effects of prisons on nearby neighborhoods. 

“I respect the fears that people have, but they are not warranted,” Taylor said.

The Department of Corrections’ position is that there is no research to support concerns that prisons increase crime or negatively affect property values, Beth Hardtke, director of communications for the department, said in an email. 

Taylor also emphasized how a Milwaukee-area prison will help keep Milwaukee youths incarcerated there connected to their families and communities. 

“I don’t know the Milwaukee that we’ve become. But I believe that this is a part of the Milwaukee that we need to be, which is one that will allow us to heal families,” she said. 

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As of May 29, there were 53 boys at Lincoln Hills, according to data provided by the Department of Corrections. Thirty of these boys – over half – are from the Milwaukee area.  

Ald. Larresa Taylor represents District 9, the district in which the prison will be built. She takes a balanced approach to the differing views on the prison.

“I want to fully represent the desires of the community and what is best for them,” she said. 


Devin Blake is the criminal justice reporter for the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service. His position is funded by the Public Welfare Foundation, which plays no role in editorial decisions in the NNS newsroom.





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Minneapolis, MN

BCA confirms police use-of-force incident in Minneapolis

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BCA confirms police use-of-force incident in Minneapolis


The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA) says it is investigating Wednesday night following a police use-of-force incident in south Minneapolis.

Early Thursday, Minneapolis police announced Police Chief Brian O’Hara would speak about a shooting involving an officer about 9:20 p.m. Wednesday.

The BCA did not immediately confirm where it happened, but Minneapolis City Council Member Jason Chavez said in a post on X that it was in the area of 34th Street and Hiawatha Avenue, calling it a possible shooting, based on reports from community members. O’Hara was scheduled to give comments “near 3301 Hiawatha Av.”

A little before 10 p.m. Wednesday, Metro Transit announced that, “due to police activity,” the Blue line train service would be suspended between the Franklin Avenue station and 46th Street station.”Blue line trains will reverse direction at these stations. Trains will not travel to 38th St Station or Lake St Station until situation is resolved,” Metro Transit said in its alert.

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This is a breaking news story. Check back at StarTribune.com for updates.



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