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Detroit, MI

3 Detroit affordable housing developments nab state funding

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3 Detroit affordable housing developments nab state funding


Last week, the Michigan State Housing Development Authority (MSHDA) approved funding for three developments across Detroit with affordable housing components.

The most notable development is of the Higginbotham School, located at 8730 Chippewa Street near Wyoming and 8 Mile. The historic school, listed on the National Register for Historic Places, will have two additional new construction buildings next to it, with a total of 100 units between the three buildings. All units will be reserved for tenants between 30% to 80% Area Median Income (AMI). A community and non-profit space is also part of this development.

The $36 million development is led by URGE Development. MSHDA approved $25 million in total funding. 

MSHDA also approved funding for upgrades to the Peterboro Place Apartments, located at Peterboro and Woodward. The board approved $14.7 million for the project, which has 70 permanent supportive housing units, with seven of those as accessible units. Residents of the building have rental assistance options for homelessness and support services.

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The third development, Minock Park Place Apartments, is for seniors in the Grandmont Rosedale neighborhoods. The $22 million project received $12.8 million in loans. The new four-story building will have 36 one-bedroom apartments and six two-bedroom apartments, with 24 for tenants earning up to 60% AMI, and 18 for tenants earning up to 50% AMI.

“The developments approved by the Board this month will have a large impact on some of Detroit’s most vulnerable residents,” said Amy Hovey, CEO and Executive Director at MSHDA. “Projects like these reflect our mission of partnering to provide quality affordable housing.”



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Detroit, MI

Lakers' Austin Reaves Tells Pistons Fan He's 'Not Going to Detroit' in Viral Video

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Lakers' Austin Reaves Tells Pistons Fan He's 'Not Going to Detroit' in Viral Video


Katelyn Mulcahy/Getty Images

Austin Reaves isn’t interested in becoming a member of the Detroit Pistons.

The Los Angeles Lakers guard said as much to a fan, who was trying to recruit him to the Pistons, while golfing on Wednesday:

Tristan @TBeckmann24

Austin Reaves was playing in a golf tournament recently and a fan told him “We need you on the Pistons, Austin”.
Reaves responded: “I’m not going to Detroit”
☠️ pic.twitter.com/QS025LufhO

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It’s hard to blame him. The Pistons were the NBA’s worst team last season, finishing 14-68, and just fired head coach Monty Williams. The team has some promising young talents, led by Cade Cunningham, Jaden Ivey, Jalen Duren and Ausar Thompson, but appears to be a long way from competing for playoff berths or championships.

The Lakers, meanwhile, have struggled to get the roster balance right around the star duo of LeBron James and Anthony Davis, but have fought their way into the playoffs the past two seasons nonetheless.

There isn’t a player in the NBA who would say with a straight face that they would rather player for the current iteration of the Pistons over the Lakers. Reaves is no exception.





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Detroit, MI

Juneteenth on the Cut event in Detroit canceled as possible storms, hail loom

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Juneteenth on the Cut event in Detroit canceled as possible storms, hail loom


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The annual Juneteenth on the Cut event in Detroit was canceled shortly before it was set to begin Wednesday with organizers citing inclement weather as blazing heat threatened to bring powerful storms.

The event, hosted by the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy, was scheduled to kick off at 2 p.m. at the Campbell Terrace on the Dequindre Cut Greenway and include live performances to mark the day enslaved people in Galveston, Texas, learned they’d been freed two years after the Emancipation Proclamation.  

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The event was expected to go on despite a heat advisory in effect until Thursday night. However, news of storms with possible hail on top of the heat brought plans Wednesday to a halt, said Marc Pasco, director of communications for the conservancy.

The heat — with an index of 96 degrees in Detroit — and humidity were driving the chance of storms, which could become dangerous in the afternoon and evening, said National Weather Service meteorologist Megan Varcie out of the White Lake Township office.

In particular, storms could hit between 2 p.m. and 10 p.m., she said. High winds may be a greater threat, but there’s also an isolated chance for hail along with heavy rain.

Storms are also possible the rest of the week as the heat continues, before a cold front brings temperatures back down into the 80s, Varcie said.

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We’re settling the debate, Michigan: At what temperature do you set your AC thermostat?

Varcie warned people to take precautions during the heat and with the storms: “Thunder roars, go indoors.”

Whether the Juneteenth on the Cut event would be rescheduled was yet to be seen. Organizers first wanted to alert vendors and attendees to not head to the Dequindre Cut, Pasco said.

Still available, however, will be an experience called Core 375. The project imagines if a “core sample” was taken of the soil and stories and songs were told for the generations in that sample — the Ice Age, the native Anishinaabeg people and the historic, predominantly Black neighborhood Black Bottom. The Dequindre Cut sits on the eastern border of Black Bottom, which was demolished for redevelopment and replaced with Lafayette Park and the I-375 freeway.

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The project was slated to open with a live performance on Juneteenth, but QR codes will still be place along the Cut to be listened to through the end of the year, Pasco said.



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Detroit, MI

TWENTYMAN: 5 numbers to keep up

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TWENTYMAN: 5 numbers to keep up


What it means: Opponent average starting field position

Twentyman: I include this number because the importance gets magnified considerably this season with the new kickoff rules in place to encourage returns. The fact that head coach Dan Campbell and special teams coordinator Dave Fipp schemed for teams to return kicks and emphasized covering them under the old rules should bode well as the league transitions to returns on just about every kick this season.

The Lions forced opponents to start drives inside their own 20-yard line the second most times among all 32 teams last season, second only to Green Bay. Detroit didn’t allow a single kickoff return to start in their own territory across the 50. Detroit plans to make covering kickoffs a weapon for them this year and they have a great base of production to work from.

What it means: The number of 20-plus yard plays recorded by Detroit’s offense

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Twentyman: Offensive coordinator Ben Johnson has put the big play back in Detroit’s offense. Only San Francisco (86) recorded more 20-plus yard gains than the Lions last season. The Lions’ 241 plays of 10-plus yards ranked third in the NFL.

Detroit had 16 big-play touchdowns of 20-plus yards last season, which were second only to Miami’s 19. The Lions scored 126 points outside the red zone, which was fifth best in the league. The ability to get big plays at a high clip and score anywhere on the field leaves a defense always on edge.



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